An automated home-cage-based 5-choice serial reaction time task for rapid assessment of attention and impulsivity in rats

B. Bruinsma, H. Terra, S. F. de Kloet, A. Luchicchi, A. J. Timmerman, E. Remmelink, M. Loos, Tommy Pattij, Huibert D. Mansvelder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Rationale: The 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) is a widely used operant task for measuring attention and motor impulsivity in rodents. Training animals in this task requires an extensive period of daily operant sessions. Recently, a self-paced, automated version of this task has been developed for mice, which substantially reduces training time. Whether a similar approach is effective for rats is currently unknown. Objective: Here, we tested whether attention and impulsivity can be assessed in rats with a self-paced version of the 5-CSRTT. Methods: Operant boxes were connected to home-cages with tunnels. Two groups of rats self-paced their training by means of an automated script. The first group of animals was allowed unlimited access (UA) to start trials in the task; for the second group, trial availability was restricted to the first 2.5 h of the dark cycle (TR). Task parameter manipulations, such as variable inter-trial intervals and stimulus durations as well as pharmacological challenges with scopolamine, were tested to validate the task. Results: Self-paced training took less than 1 week. Animals in the UA group showed higher levels of omissions compared with the TR group. In both protocols, variable inter-trial intervals increased impulsivity, and variable stimulus durations decreased attentional performance. Scopolamine affected cognitive performance in the TR group only. Conclusions: Home-cage-based training of the 5-CSRTT in rats, especially the TR protocol, presents a valid and fast alternative for measuring attention and impulsivity.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPsychopharmacology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Cite this

Bruinsma, B. ; Terra, H. ; de Kloet, S. F. ; Luchicchi, A. ; Timmerman, A. J. ; Remmelink, E. ; Loos, M. ; Pattij, Tommy ; Mansvelder, Huibert D. / An automated home-cage-based 5-choice serial reaction time task for rapid assessment of attention and impulsivity in rats. In: Psychopharmacology. 2019.
@article{854432d7bb1e425b9ff5ab2176a08d9b,
title = "An automated home-cage-based 5-choice serial reaction time task for rapid assessment of attention and impulsivity in rats",
abstract = "Rationale: The 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) is a widely used operant task for measuring attention and motor impulsivity in rodents. Training animals in this task requires an extensive period of daily operant sessions. Recently, a self-paced, automated version of this task has been developed for mice, which substantially reduces training time. Whether a similar approach is effective for rats is currently unknown. Objective: Here, we tested whether attention and impulsivity can be assessed in rats with a self-paced version of the 5-CSRTT. Methods: Operant boxes were connected to home-cages with tunnels. Two groups of rats self-paced their training by means of an automated script. The first group of animals was allowed unlimited access (UA) to start trials in the task; for the second group, trial availability was restricted to the first 2.5 h of the dark cycle (TR). Task parameter manipulations, such as variable inter-trial intervals and stimulus durations as well as pharmacological challenges with scopolamine, were tested to validate the task. Results: Self-paced training took less than 1 week. Animals in the UA group showed higher levels of omissions compared with the TR group. In both protocols, variable inter-trial intervals increased impulsivity, and variable stimulus durations decreased attentional performance. Scopolamine affected cognitive performance in the TR group only. Conclusions: Home-cage-based training of the 5-CSRTT in rats, especially the TR protocol, presents a valid and fast alternative for measuring attention and impulsivity.",
author = "B. Bruinsma and H. Terra and {de Kloet}, {S. F.} and A. Luchicchi and Timmerman, {A. J.} and E. Remmelink and M. Loos and Tommy Pattij and Mansvelder, {Huibert D.}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1007/s00213-019-05189-0",
language = "English",
journal = "Psychopharmacology",
issn = "0033-3158",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",

}

An automated home-cage-based 5-choice serial reaction time task for rapid assessment of attention and impulsivity in rats. / Bruinsma, B.; Terra, H.; de Kloet, S. F.; Luchicchi, A.; Timmerman, A. J.; Remmelink, E.; Loos, M.; Pattij, Tommy; Mansvelder, Huibert D.

In: Psychopharmacology, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - An automated home-cage-based 5-choice serial reaction time task for rapid assessment of attention and impulsivity in rats

AU - Bruinsma, B.

AU - Terra, H.

AU - de Kloet, S. F.

AU - Luchicchi, A.

AU - Timmerman, A. J.

AU - Remmelink, E.

AU - Loos, M.

AU - Pattij, Tommy

AU - Mansvelder, Huibert D.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Rationale: The 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) is a widely used operant task for measuring attention and motor impulsivity in rodents. Training animals in this task requires an extensive period of daily operant sessions. Recently, a self-paced, automated version of this task has been developed for mice, which substantially reduces training time. Whether a similar approach is effective for rats is currently unknown. Objective: Here, we tested whether attention and impulsivity can be assessed in rats with a self-paced version of the 5-CSRTT. Methods: Operant boxes were connected to home-cages with tunnels. Two groups of rats self-paced their training by means of an automated script. The first group of animals was allowed unlimited access (UA) to start trials in the task; for the second group, trial availability was restricted to the first 2.5 h of the dark cycle (TR). Task parameter manipulations, such as variable inter-trial intervals and stimulus durations as well as pharmacological challenges with scopolamine, were tested to validate the task. Results: Self-paced training took less than 1 week. Animals in the UA group showed higher levels of omissions compared with the TR group. In both protocols, variable inter-trial intervals increased impulsivity, and variable stimulus durations decreased attentional performance. Scopolamine affected cognitive performance in the TR group only. Conclusions: Home-cage-based training of the 5-CSRTT in rats, especially the TR protocol, presents a valid and fast alternative for measuring attention and impulsivity.

AB - Rationale: The 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) is a widely used operant task for measuring attention and motor impulsivity in rodents. Training animals in this task requires an extensive period of daily operant sessions. Recently, a self-paced, automated version of this task has been developed for mice, which substantially reduces training time. Whether a similar approach is effective for rats is currently unknown. Objective: Here, we tested whether attention and impulsivity can be assessed in rats with a self-paced version of the 5-CSRTT. Methods: Operant boxes were connected to home-cages with tunnels. Two groups of rats self-paced their training by means of an automated script. The first group of animals was allowed unlimited access (UA) to start trials in the task; for the second group, trial availability was restricted to the first 2.5 h of the dark cycle (TR). Task parameter manipulations, such as variable inter-trial intervals and stimulus durations as well as pharmacological challenges with scopolamine, were tested to validate the task. Results: Self-paced training took less than 1 week. Animals in the UA group showed higher levels of omissions compared with the TR group. In both protocols, variable inter-trial intervals increased impulsivity, and variable stimulus durations decreased attentional performance. Scopolamine affected cognitive performance in the TR group only. Conclusions: Home-cage-based training of the 5-CSRTT in rats, especially the TR protocol, presents a valid and fast alternative for measuring attention and impulsivity.

UR - https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85062670174&origin=inward

UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30826849

U2 - 10.1007/s00213-019-05189-0

DO - 10.1007/s00213-019-05189-0

M3 - Article

JO - Psychopharmacology

JF - Psychopharmacology

SN - 0033-3158

ER -