Associations with Corneal Hysteresis in a Population Cohort: Results from 96 010 UK Biobank Participants

UKBiobank Eye and Vision Consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To describe the distribution of corneal hysteresis (CH) in a large cohort and explore its associated factors and possible clinical applications. Design: Cross-sectional study within the UK Biobank, a large cohort study in the United Kingdom. Participants: We analyzed CH data from 93 345 eligible participants in the UK Biobank cohort, aged 40 to 69 years. Methods: All analyses were performed using left eye data. Linear regression models were used to evaluate associations between CH and demographic, lifestyle, ocular, and systemic variables. Piecewise logistic regression models were used to explore the relationship between self-reported glaucoma and CH. Main Outcome Measures: Corneal hysteresis (mmHg). Results: The mean CH was 10.6 mmHg (10.4 mmHg in male and 10.8 mmHg in female participants). After adjusting for covariables, CH was significantly negatively associated with male sex, age, black ethnicity, self-reported glaucoma, diastolic blood pressure, and height. Corneal hysteresis was significantly positively associated with smoking, hyperopia, diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), greater deprivation (Townsend index), and Goldmann-correlated intraocular pressure (IOPg). Self-reported glaucoma and CH were significantly associated when CH was less than 10.1 mmHg (odds ratio, 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.79–0.94 per mmHg CH increase) after adjusting for covariables. When CH exceeded 10.1 mmHg, there was no significant association between CH and self-reported glaucoma. Conclusions: In our analyses, CH was significantly associated with factors including age, sex, and ethnicity, which should be taken into account when interpreting CH values. In our cohort, lower CH was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of self-reported glaucoma when CH was less than 10.1 mmHg. Corneal hysteresis may serve as a biomarker aiding glaucoma case detection.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1500-1510
JournalOphthalmology
Volume126
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2019

Cite this

UKBiobank Eye and Vision Consortium. / Associations with Corneal Hysteresis in a Population Cohort: Results from 96 010 UK Biobank Participants. In: Ophthalmology. 2019 ; Vol. 126, No. 11. pp. 1500-1510.
@article{378a4c6d26ec485ab67f9a53b4035678,
title = "Associations with Corneal Hysteresis in a Population Cohort: Results from 96 010 UK Biobank Participants",
abstract = "Purpose: To describe the distribution of corneal hysteresis (CH) in a large cohort and explore its associated factors and possible clinical applications. Design: Cross-sectional study within the UK Biobank, a large cohort study in the United Kingdom. Participants: We analyzed CH data from 93 345 eligible participants in the UK Biobank cohort, aged 40 to 69 years. Methods: All analyses were performed using left eye data. Linear regression models were used to evaluate associations between CH and demographic, lifestyle, ocular, and systemic variables. Piecewise logistic regression models were used to explore the relationship between self-reported glaucoma and CH. Main Outcome Measures: Corneal hysteresis (mmHg). Results: The mean CH was 10.6 mmHg (10.4 mmHg in male and 10.8 mmHg in female participants). After adjusting for covariables, CH was significantly negatively associated with male sex, age, black ethnicity, self-reported glaucoma, diastolic blood pressure, and height. Corneal hysteresis was significantly positively associated with smoking, hyperopia, diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), greater deprivation (Townsend index), and Goldmann-correlated intraocular pressure (IOPg). Self-reported glaucoma and CH were significantly associated when CH was less than 10.1 mmHg (odds ratio, 0.86; 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.79–0.94 per mmHg CH increase) after adjusting for covariables. When CH exceeded 10.1 mmHg, there was no significant association between CH and self-reported glaucoma. Conclusions: In our analyses, CH was significantly associated with factors including age, sex, and ethnicity, which should be taken into account when interpreting CH values. In our cohort, lower CH was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of self-reported glaucoma when CH was less than 10.1 mmHg. Corneal hysteresis may serve as a biomarker aiding glaucoma case detection.",
author = "Bing Zhang and Yusrah Shweikh and {UKBiobank Eye and Vision Consortium} and Khawaja, {Anthony P.} and John Gallacher and Sarah Bauermeister and Foster, {Paul J.} and Tariq Aslam and Barman, {Sarah A.} and Barrett, {Jenny H.} and Paul Bishop and Peter Blows and Catey Bunce and Carare, {Roxana O.} and Usha Chakravarthy and Michelle Chan and Chua, {Sharon Y. L.} and Crabb, {David P.} and Cumberland, {Philippa M.} and Alexander Day and Parul Desai and Bal Dhillon and Dick, {Andrew D.} and Cathy Egan and Sarah Ennis and Paul Foster and Marcus Fruttiger and Gallacher, {John E. J.} and Garway-Heath, {David F.} and Jane Gibson and Dan Gore and Guggenheim, {Jeremy A.} and Hammond, {Chris J.} and Alison Hardcastle and Harding, {Simon P.} and Hogg, {Ruth E.} and Pirro Hysi and Keane, {Pearse A.} and Khaw, {Sir Peng T.} and Lascaratos, {Gerassim dos} and Lotery, {Andrew J.} and Tom Macgillivray and Sarah Mackie and Keith Martin and Michelle McGaughey and Bernadette McGuinness and McKay, {Gareth J.} and Martin McKibbin and Danny Mitry and Tony Moore and Axel Petzold",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ophtha.2019.06.029",
language = "English",
volume = "126",
pages = "1500--1510",
journal = "Ophthalmology",
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publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
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Associations with Corneal Hysteresis in a Population Cohort: Results from 96 010 UK Biobank Participants. / UKBiobank Eye and Vision Consortium.

In: Ophthalmology, Vol. 126, No. 11, 01.11.2019, p. 1500-1510.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations with Corneal Hysteresis in a Population Cohort: Results from 96 010 UK Biobank Participants

AU - Zhang, Bing

AU - Shweikh, Yusrah

AU - UKBiobank Eye and Vision Consortium

AU - Khawaja, Anthony P.

AU - Gallacher, John

AU - Bauermeister, Sarah

AU - Foster, Paul J.

AU - Aslam, Tariq

AU - Barman, Sarah A.

AU - Barrett, Jenny H.

AU - Bishop, Paul

AU - Blows, Peter

AU - Bunce, Catey

AU - Carare, Roxana O.

AU - Chakravarthy, Usha

AU - Chan, Michelle

AU - Chua, Sharon Y. L.

AU - Crabb, David P.

AU - Cumberland, Philippa M.

AU - Day, Alexander

AU - Desai, Parul

AU - Dhillon, Bal

AU - Dick, Andrew D.

AU - Egan, Cathy

AU - Ennis, Sarah

AU - Foster, Paul

AU - Fruttiger, Marcus

AU - Gallacher, John E. J.

AU - Garway-Heath, David F.

AU - Gibson, Jane

AU - Gore, Dan

AU - Guggenheim, Jeremy A.

AU - Hammond, Chris J.

AU - Hardcastle, Alison

AU - Harding, Simon P.

AU - Hogg, Ruth E.

AU - Hysi, Pirro

AU - Keane, Pearse A.

AU - Khaw, Sir Peng T.

AU - Lascaratos, Gerassim dos

AU - Lotery, Andrew J.

AU - Macgillivray, Tom

AU - Mackie, Sarah

AU - Martin, Keith

AU - McGaughey, Michelle

AU - McGuinness, Bernadette

AU - McKay, Gareth J.

AU - McKibbin, Martin

AU - Mitry, Danny

AU - Moore, Tony

AU - Petzold, Axel

PY - 2019/11/1

Y1 - 2019/11/1

N2 - Purpose: To describe the distribution of corneal hysteresis (CH) in a large cohort and explore its associated factors and possible clinical applications. Design: Cross-sectional study within the UK Biobank, a large cohort study in the United Kingdom. Participants: We analyzed CH data from 93 345 eligible participants in the UK Biobank cohort, aged 40 to 69 years. Methods: All analyses were performed using left eye data. Linear regression models were used to evaluate associations between CH and demographic, lifestyle, ocular, and systemic variables. Piecewise logistic regression models were used to explore the relationship between self-reported glaucoma and CH. Main Outcome Measures: Corneal hysteresis (mmHg). Results: The mean CH was 10.6 mmHg (10.4 mmHg in male and 10.8 mmHg in female participants). After adjusting for covariables, CH was significantly negatively associated with male sex, age, black ethnicity, self-reported glaucoma, diastolic blood pressure, and height. Corneal hysteresis was significantly positively associated with smoking, hyperopia, diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), greater deprivation (Townsend index), and Goldmann-correlated intraocular pressure (IOPg). Self-reported glaucoma and CH were significantly associated when CH was less than 10.1 mmHg (odds ratio, 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.79–0.94 per mmHg CH increase) after adjusting for covariables. When CH exceeded 10.1 mmHg, there was no significant association between CH and self-reported glaucoma. Conclusions: In our analyses, CH was significantly associated with factors including age, sex, and ethnicity, which should be taken into account when interpreting CH values. In our cohort, lower CH was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of self-reported glaucoma when CH was less than 10.1 mmHg. Corneal hysteresis may serve as a biomarker aiding glaucoma case detection.

AB - Purpose: To describe the distribution of corneal hysteresis (CH) in a large cohort and explore its associated factors and possible clinical applications. Design: Cross-sectional study within the UK Biobank, a large cohort study in the United Kingdom. Participants: We analyzed CH data from 93 345 eligible participants in the UK Biobank cohort, aged 40 to 69 years. Methods: All analyses were performed using left eye data. Linear regression models were used to evaluate associations between CH and demographic, lifestyle, ocular, and systemic variables. Piecewise logistic regression models were used to explore the relationship between self-reported glaucoma and CH. Main Outcome Measures: Corneal hysteresis (mmHg). Results: The mean CH was 10.6 mmHg (10.4 mmHg in male and 10.8 mmHg in female participants). After adjusting for covariables, CH was significantly negatively associated with male sex, age, black ethnicity, self-reported glaucoma, diastolic blood pressure, and height. Corneal hysteresis was significantly positively associated with smoking, hyperopia, diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), greater deprivation (Townsend index), and Goldmann-correlated intraocular pressure (IOPg). Self-reported glaucoma and CH were significantly associated when CH was less than 10.1 mmHg (odds ratio, 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.79–0.94 per mmHg CH increase) after adjusting for covariables. When CH exceeded 10.1 mmHg, there was no significant association between CH and self-reported glaucoma. Conclusions: In our analyses, CH was significantly associated with factors including age, sex, and ethnicity, which should be taken into account when interpreting CH values. In our cohort, lower CH was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of self-reported glaucoma when CH was less than 10.1 mmHg. Corneal hysteresis may serve as a biomarker aiding glaucoma case detection.

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UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31471087

U2 - 10.1016/j.ophtha.2019.06.029

DO - 10.1016/j.ophtha.2019.06.029

M3 - Article

VL - 126

SP - 1500

EP - 1510

JO - Ophthalmology

JF - Ophthalmology

SN - 0161-6420

IS - 11

ER -