B cells of multiple sclerosis patients induce autoreactive proinflammatory T cell responses

Judith Fraussen, Nele Claes, Bart Van Wijmeersch, Jack van Horssen, Piet Stinissen, Raymond Hupperts, Veerle Somers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Antibody-independent B cell functions play an important role in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. In this study, B cell antigen presentation and costimulation in MS were studied. Peripheral blood B cells of MS patients showed increased expression of costimulatory CD86 and CD80 molecules compared with healthy controls (HC). In MS cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), 12-fold and 2-fold increases in CD86+ and CD80+ B cells, respectively, were evidenced compared with peripheral blood. Further, B cells from MS patients induced proinflammatory T cells in response to myelin basic protein (MBP). Immunomodulatory treatment restored B cell costimulatory molecule expression and caused significantly reduced B cell induced T cell responses. Together, these results demonstrate the potential of B cells from MS patients to induce autoreactive proinflammatory T cell responses. Immunomodulatory therapy abrogated this effect, emphasizing the importance of B cell antigen presentation and costimulation in MS pathology.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)124-132
JournalClinical Immunology
Volume173
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

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