Brachytherapy for recurrent head and neck cancer

S. Senan, P. C. Levendag

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The outlook for patients with recurrent HNC that is not amenable to treatment with curative surgery alone is grim. Reirradiation is often possible and can have a substantial effect on local tumor control. A dose of at least 60 Gy is needed, however, and should preferably be given using BT. Radiobiological considerations dictate the use of small fraction sizes. The role of hyperbaric oxygen in reducing the morbidity associated with reirradiation (by improving the vascularization status of irradiated normal tissue) deserves further investigation. Adequate imaging and recent developments in conformal radiotherapy (3D planning and intensity-modulated radiotherapy) and stereotactic radiotherapy should be utilized in order to apply high tumoricidal doses, while minimizing the incorporated volume of irradiated critical normal tissue.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)531-542
Number of pages12
JournalHematology/Oncology Clinics of North America
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1999

Cite this

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Brachytherapy for recurrent head and neck cancer. / Senan, S.; Levendag, P. C.

In: Hematology/Oncology Clinics of North America, Vol. 13, No. 3, 01.01.1999, p. 531-542.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Brachytherapy for recurrent head and neck cancer

AU - Senan, S.

AU - Levendag, P. C.

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N2 - The outlook for patients with recurrent HNC that is not amenable to treatment with curative surgery alone is grim. Reirradiation is often possible and can have a substantial effect on local tumor control. A dose of at least 60 Gy is needed, however, and should preferably be given using BT. Radiobiological considerations dictate the use of small fraction sizes. The role of hyperbaric oxygen in reducing the morbidity associated with reirradiation (by improving the vascularization status of irradiated normal tissue) deserves further investigation. Adequate imaging and recent developments in conformal radiotherapy (3D planning and intensity-modulated radiotherapy) and stereotactic radiotherapy should be utilized in order to apply high tumoricidal doses, while minimizing the incorporated volume of irradiated critical normal tissue.

AB - The outlook for patients with recurrent HNC that is not amenable to treatment with curative surgery alone is grim. Reirradiation is often possible and can have a substantial effect on local tumor control. A dose of at least 60 Gy is needed, however, and should preferably be given using BT. Radiobiological considerations dictate the use of small fraction sizes. The role of hyperbaric oxygen in reducing the morbidity associated with reirradiation (by improving the vascularization status of irradiated normal tissue) deserves further investigation. Adequate imaging and recent developments in conformal radiotherapy (3D planning and intensity-modulated radiotherapy) and stereotactic radiotherapy should be utilized in order to apply high tumoricidal doses, while minimizing the incorporated volume of irradiated critical normal tissue.

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