Can chronotype function as predictor of a persistent course of depressive and anxiety disorder?

S. J. M. Druiven, S. E. Knapen, B. W. J. H. Penninx, N. Antypa, R. A. Schoevers, H. Riese, Y. Meesters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: The role of chronotype, the individual timing of sleep/activity, has been studied in relation to depressive and anxiety disorders. A cross-sectional association between a depressive episode and evening-type has been identified. However, until now the predicting capacity of chronotype concerning persistence of psychiatric disorders remains unclear. Our aim is to examine whether a later chronotype in patients with a depressive and/or anxiety disorder can serve as a predictor of a persistent course. Methods: A subsample of patients with a depressive and/or anxiety disorder diagnosis and chronotype data of the longitudinal Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) was used. Diagnosis of depressive and anxiety disorders (1-month DSM-IV based diagnosis) were determined at baseline (n = 505). From this group persistence was determined at 2-year (FU2) (persistent course: n = 248, non-persistent course: n = 208) and 4-year follow-up (FU4) (persistent course: n = 151, non-persistent course: n = 264). Chronotype was assessed at baseline with the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire. Results: A later chronotype did not predict a persistent course of depressive and/or anxiety disorder at FU2 (OR (95% CI) = 0.99 (0.83–1.19), P = 0.92) or at FU4 (OR (95% CI) = 0.94 (0.77–1.15), P = 0.57). Limitations: Persistence was defined as having a diagnosis of depressive and/or anxiety disorder at the two-year and four-year follow-up, patients may have remitted and relapsed between assessments. Conclusion: Chronotype, measured as actual sleep timing, of patients with a depressive or anxiety disorder did not predict a persistent course which suggests it might be unsuitable as predictive tool in clinical settings.
LanguageEnglish
Pages159-164
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume242
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

Cite this

Druiven, S. J. M., Knapen, S. E., Penninx, B. W. J. H., Antypa, N., Schoevers, R. A., Riese, H., & Meesters, Y. (2019). Can chronotype function as predictor of a persistent course of depressive and anxiety disorder? Journal of Affective Disorders, 242, 159-164. DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2018.08.064
Druiven, S. J. M. ; Knapen, S. E. ; Penninx, B. W. J. H. ; Antypa, N. ; Schoevers, R. A. ; Riese, H. ; Meesters, Y./ Can chronotype function as predictor of a persistent course of depressive and anxiety disorder?. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 2019 ; Vol. 242. pp. 159-164
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title = "Can chronotype function as predictor of a persistent course of depressive and anxiety disorder?",
abstract = "Background: The role of chronotype, the individual timing of sleep/activity, has been studied in relation to depressive and anxiety disorders. A cross-sectional association between a depressive episode and evening-type has been identified. However, until now the predicting capacity of chronotype concerning persistence of psychiatric disorders remains unclear. Our aim is to examine whether a later chronotype in patients with a depressive and/or anxiety disorder can serve as a predictor of a persistent course. Methods: A subsample of patients with a depressive and/or anxiety disorder diagnosis and chronotype data of the longitudinal Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) was used. Diagnosis of depressive and anxiety disorders (1-month DSM-IV based diagnosis) were determined at baseline (n = 505). From this group persistence was determined at 2-year (FU2) (persistent course: n = 248, non-persistent course: n = 208) and 4-year follow-up (FU4) (persistent course: n = 151, non-persistent course: n = 264). Chronotype was assessed at baseline with the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire. Results: A later chronotype did not predict a persistent course of depressive and/or anxiety disorder at FU2 (OR (95{\%} CI) = 0.99 (0.83–1.19), P = 0.92) or at FU4 (OR (95{\%} CI) = 0.94 (0.77–1.15), P = 0.57). Limitations: Persistence was defined as having a diagnosis of depressive and/or anxiety disorder at the two-year and four-year follow-up, patients may have remitted and relapsed between assessments. Conclusion: Chronotype, measured as actual sleep timing, of patients with a depressive or anxiety disorder did not predict a persistent course which suggests it might be unsuitable as predictive tool in clinical settings.",
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Druiven, SJM, Knapen, SE, Penninx, BWJH, Antypa, N, Schoevers, RA, Riese, H & Meesters, Y 2019, 'Can chronotype function as predictor of a persistent course of depressive and anxiety disorder?' Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 242, pp. 159-164. DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2018.08.064

Can chronotype function as predictor of a persistent course of depressive and anxiety disorder? / Druiven, S. J. M.; Knapen, S. E.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Antypa, N.; Schoevers, R. A.; Riese, H.; Meesters, Y.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 242, 2019, p. 159-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Can chronotype function as predictor of a persistent course of depressive and anxiety disorder?

AU - Druiven,S. J. M.

AU - Knapen,S. E.

AU - Penninx,B. W. J. H.

AU - Antypa,N.

AU - Schoevers,R. A.

AU - Riese,H.

AU - Meesters,Y.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Background: The role of chronotype, the individual timing of sleep/activity, has been studied in relation to depressive and anxiety disorders. A cross-sectional association between a depressive episode and evening-type has been identified. However, until now the predicting capacity of chronotype concerning persistence of psychiatric disorders remains unclear. Our aim is to examine whether a later chronotype in patients with a depressive and/or anxiety disorder can serve as a predictor of a persistent course. Methods: A subsample of patients with a depressive and/or anxiety disorder diagnosis and chronotype data of the longitudinal Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) was used. Diagnosis of depressive and anxiety disorders (1-month DSM-IV based diagnosis) were determined at baseline (n = 505). From this group persistence was determined at 2-year (FU2) (persistent course: n = 248, non-persistent course: n = 208) and 4-year follow-up (FU4) (persistent course: n = 151, non-persistent course: n = 264). Chronotype was assessed at baseline with the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire. Results: A later chronotype did not predict a persistent course of depressive and/or anxiety disorder at FU2 (OR (95% CI) = 0.99 (0.83–1.19), P = 0.92) or at FU4 (OR (95% CI) = 0.94 (0.77–1.15), P = 0.57). Limitations: Persistence was defined as having a diagnosis of depressive and/or anxiety disorder at the two-year and four-year follow-up, patients may have remitted and relapsed between assessments. Conclusion: Chronotype, measured as actual sleep timing, of patients with a depressive or anxiety disorder did not predict a persistent course which suggests it might be unsuitable as predictive tool in clinical settings.

AB - Background: The role of chronotype, the individual timing of sleep/activity, has been studied in relation to depressive and anxiety disorders. A cross-sectional association between a depressive episode and evening-type has been identified. However, until now the predicting capacity of chronotype concerning persistence of psychiatric disorders remains unclear. Our aim is to examine whether a later chronotype in patients with a depressive and/or anxiety disorder can serve as a predictor of a persistent course. Methods: A subsample of patients with a depressive and/or anxiety disorder diagnosis and chronotype data of the longitudinal Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) was used. Diagnosis of depressive and anxiety disorders (1-month DSM-IV based diagnosis) were determined at baseline (n = 505). From this group persistence was determined at 2-year (FU2) (persistent course: n = 248, non-persistent course: n = 208) and 4-year follow-up (FU4) (persistent course: n = 151, non-persistent course: n = 264). Chronotype was assessed at baseline with the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire. Results: A later chronotype did not predict a persistent course of depressive and/or anxiety disorder at FU2 (OR (95% CI) = 0.99 (0.83–1.19), P = 0.92) or at FU4 (OR (95% CI) = 0.94 (0.77–1.15), P = 0.57). Limitations: Persistence was defined as having a diagnosis of depressive and/or anxiety disorder at the two-year and four-year follow-up, patients may have remitted and relapsed between assessments. Conclusion: Chronotype, measured as actual sleep timing, of patients with a depressive or anxiety disorder did not predict a persistent course which suggests it might be unsuitable as predictive tool in clinical settings.

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UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30179789

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