Cannabis use and suicide attempts among 86,254 adolescents aged 12–15 years from 21 low- and middle-income countries

Andre F. Carvalho, Brendon Stubbs, Davy Vancampfort, Stefan Kloiber, Michael Maes, Joseph Firth, Paul A. Kurdyak, Dan J. Stein, J. rgen Rehm, Ai Koyanagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Evidence suggests that cannabis use may be associated with suicidality in adolescence. Nevertheless, very few studies have assessed this association in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). In this cross-sectional survey, we investigated the association of cannabis use and suicidal attempts in adolescents from 21 LMICs, adjusting for potential confounders. Method: Data from the Global school-based Student Health Survey was analyzed in 86,254 adolescents from 21 countries [mean (SD) age = 13.7 (0.9) years; 49.0% girls]. Suicide attempts during past year and cannabis during past month and lifetime were assessed. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results: The overall prevalence of past 30-day cannabis use was 2.8% and the age-sex adjusted prevalence varied from 0.5% (Laos) to 37.6% (Samoa), while the overall prevalence of lifetime cannabis use was 3.9% (range 0.5%–44.9%). The overall prevalence of suicide attempts during the past year was 10.5%. Following multivariable adjustment to potential confounding variables, past 30-day cannabis use was significantly associated with suicide attempts (OR = 2.03; 95% CI: 1.42–2.91). Lifetime cannabis use was also independently associated with suicide attempts (OR = 2.30; 95% CI: 1.74–3.04). Conclusion: Our data indicate that cannabis use is associated with a greater likelihood for suicide attempts in adolescents living in LMICs. The causality of this association should be confirmed/refuted in prospective studies to further inform public health policies for suicide prevention in LMICs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8-13
JournalEuropean Psychiatry
Volume56
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2019
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Carvalho, Andre F. ; Stubbs, Brendon ; Vancampfort, Davy ; Kloiber, Stefan ; Maes, Michael ; Firth, Joseph ; Kurdyak, Paul A. ; Stein, Dan J. ; Rehm, J. rgen ; Koyanagi, Ai. / Cannabis use and suicide attempts among 86,254 adolescents aged 12–15 years from 21 low- and middle-income countries. In: European Psychiatry. 2019 ; Vol. 56. pp. 8-13.
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title = "Cannabis use and suicide attempts among 86,254 adolescents aged 12–15 years from 21 low- and middle-income countries",
abstract = "Background: Evidence suggests that cannabis use may be associated with suicidality in adolescence. Nevertheless, very few studies have assessed this association in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). In this cross-sectional survey, we investigated the association of cannabis use and suicidal attempts in adolescents from 21 LMICs, adjusting for potential confounders. Method: Data from the Global school-based Student Health Survey was analyzed in 86,254 adolescents from 21 countries [mean (SD) age = 13.7 (0.9) years; 49.0{\%} girls]. Suicide attempts during past year and cannabis during past month and lifetime were assessed. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results: The overall prevalence of past 30-day cannabis use was 2.8{\%} and the age-sex adjusted prevalence varied from 0.5{\%} (Laos) to 37.6{\%} (Samoa), while the overall prevalence of lifetime cannabis use was 3.9{\%} (range 0.5{\%}–44.9{\%}). The overall prevalence of suicide attempts during the past year was 10.5{\%}. Following multivariable adjustment to potential confounding variables, past 30-day cannabis use was significantly associated with suicide attempts (OR = 2.03; 95{\%} CI: 1.42–2.91). Lifetime cannabis use was also independently associated with suicide attempts (OR = 2.30; 95{\%} CI: 1.74–3.04). Conclusion: Our data indicate that cannabis use is associated with a greater likelihood for suicide attempts in adolescents living in LMICs. The causality of this association should be confirmed/refuted in prospective studies to further inform public health policies for suicide prevention in LMICs.",
author = "Carvalho, {Andre F.} and Brendon Stubbs and Davy Vancampfort and Stefan Kloiber and Michael Maes and Joseph Firth and Kurdyak, {Paul A.} and Stein, {Dan J.} and Rehm, {J. rgen} and Ai Koyanagi",
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Carvalho, AF, Stubbs, B, Vancampfort, D, Kloiber, S, Maes, M, Firth, J, Kurdyak, PA, Stein, DJ, Rehm, JR & Koyanagi, A 2019, 'Cannabis use and suicide attempts among 86,254 adolescents aged 12–15 years from 21 low- and middle-income countries' European Psychiatry, vol. 56, pp. 8-13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eurpsy.2018.10.006

Cannabis use and suicide attempts among 86,254 adolescents aged 12–15 years from 21 low- and middle-income countries. / Carvalho, Andre F.; Stubbs, Brendon; Vancampfort, Davy; Kloiber, Stefan; Maes, Michael; Firth, Joseph; Kurdyak, Paul A.; Stein, Dan J.; Rehm, J. rgen; Koyanagi, Ai.

In: European Psychiatry, Vol. 56, 01.02.2019, p. 8-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Cannabis use and suicide attempts among 86,254 adolescents aged 12–15 years from 21 low- and middle-income countries

AU - Carvalho, Andre F.

AU - Stubbs, Brendon

AU - Vancampfort, Davy

AU - Kloiber, Stefan

AU - Maes, Michael

AU - Firth, Joseph

AU - Kurdyak, Paul A.

AU - Stein, Dan J.

AU - Rehm, J. rgen

AU - Koyanagi, Ai

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N2 - Background: Evidence suggests that cannabis use may be associated with suicidality in adolescence. Nevertheless, very few studies have assessed this association in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). In this cross-sectional survey, we investigated the association of cannabis use and suicidal attempts in adolescents from 21 LMICs, adjusting for potential confounders. Method: Data from the Global school-based Student Health Survey was analyzed in 86,254 adolescents from 21 countries [mean (SD) age = 13.7 (0.9) years; 49.0% girls]. Suicide attempts during past year and cannabis during past month and lifetime were assessed. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results: The overall prevalence of past 30-day cannabis use was 2.8% and the age-sex adjusted prevalence varied from 0.5% (Laos) to 37.6% (Samoa), while the overall prevalence of lifetime cannabis use was 3.9% (range 0.5%–44.9%). The overall prevalence of suicide attempts during the past year was 10.5%. Following multivariable adjustment to potential confounding variables, past 30-day cannabis use was significantly associated with suicide attempts (OR = 2.03; 95% CI: 1.42–2.91). Lifetime cannabis use was also independently associated with suicide attempts (OR = 2.30; 95% CI: 1.74–3.04). Conclusion: Our data indicate that cannabis use is associated with a greater likelihood for suicide attempts in adolescents living in LMICs. The causality of this association should be confirmed/refuted in prospective studies to further inform public health policies for suicide prevention in LMICs.

AB - Background: Evidence suggests that cannabis use may be associated with suicidality in adolescence. Nevertheless, very few studies have assessed this association in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). In this cross-sectional survey, we investigated the association of cannabis use and suicidal attempts in adolescents from 21 LMICs, adjusting for potential confounders. Method: Data from the Global school-based Student Health Survey was analyzed in 86,254 adolescents from 21 countries [mean (SD) age = 13.7 (0.9) years; 49.0% girls]. Suicide attempts during past year and cannabis during past month and lifetime were assessed. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results: The overall prevalence of past 30-day cannabis use was 2.8% and the age-sex adjusted prevalence varied from 0.5% (Laos) to 37.6% (Samoa), while the overall prevalence of lifetime cannabis use was 3.9% (range 0.5%–44.9%). The overall prevalence of suicide attempts during the past year was 10.5%. Following multivariable adjustment to potential confounding variables, past 30-day cannabis use was significantly associated with suicide attempts (OR = 2.03; 95% CI: 1.42–2.91). Lifetime cannabis use was also independently associated with suicide attempts (OR = 2.30; 95% CI: 1.74–3.04). Conclusion: Our data indicate that cannabis use is associated with a greater likelihood for suicide attempts in adolescents living in LMICs. The causality of this association should be confirmed/refuted in prospective studies to further inform public health policies for suicide prevention in LMICs.

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