Cardiovascular disease risk factors and the relationships with physical activity, aerobic fitness, and body fat in adolescents and young adults with myelomeningocele

Laurien M Buffart, Rita J van den Berg-Emons, Alex Burdorf, Wim G Janssen, Henk J Stam, Marij E Roebroeck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To describe cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in adolescents and young adults with myelomeningocele (MMC) and to explore relationships with physical activity, aerobic fitness, and body fat.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.

SETTING: Outpatient clinic.

PARTICIPANTS: Adolescents and young adults (N=31) with MMC (58% men) age 16 through 30 years; 13 were ambulatory and 18 were nonambulatory.

INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We studied biologic and lifestyle-related CVD risk factors, including lipid and lipoprotein profiles, blood pressure, aerobic fitness (Vo(2)peak), body fat, daily physical activity, and smoking behavior. We considered subjects at increased CVD risk when 2 or more of the following risk factors clustered: systolic blood pressure, total serum cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and cigarette smoking. Relationships were studied using regression analyses.

RESULTS: Levels of TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides were elevated in 29%, 38%, and 3% of the participants, respectively. HDL-C was reduced in 19%. Hypertension was found in 20%, and 19% were current cigarette smokers. Based on the clustering of risk factors, 42% of the participants were at increased CVD risk: 15% of ambulatory participants and 61% of nonambulatory participants (P=.03). Adjusted for sex and ambulatory status, participants with higher aerobic fitness tended to be more likely to have no CVD risk (odds ratio=13.0; P=.07). CVD risk was not associated to physical activity and body fat.

CONCLUSIONS: A large proportion of the study sample was at CVD risk, indicated by clustering of risk factors. Improving aerobic fitness in young adults with MMC may contribute in reducing CVD risk; this needs to be confirmed in future studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2167-73
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume89
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2008

Cite this

@article{32d35292f4224578900f549dcc2a15a9,
title = "Cardiovascular disease risk factors and the relationships with physical activity, aerobic fitness, and body fat in adolescents and young adults with myelomeningocele",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To describe cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in adolescents and young adults with myelomeningocele (MMC) and to explore relationships with physical activity, aerobic fitness, and body fat.DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.SETTING: Outpatient clinic.PARTICIPANTS: Adolescents and young adults (N=31) with MMC (58{\%} men) age 16 through 30 years; 13 were ambulatory and 18 were nonambulatory.INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We studied biologic and lifestyle-related CVD risk factors, including lipid and lipoprotein profiles, blood pressure, aerobic fitness (Vo(2)peak), body fat, daily physical activity, and smoking behavior. We considered subjects at increased CVD risk when 2 or more of the following risk factors clustered: systolic blood pressure, total serum cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and cigarette smoking. Relationships were studied using regression analyses.RESULTS: Levels of TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides were elevated in 29{\%}, 38{\%}, and 3{\%} of the participants, respectively. HDL-C was reduced in 19{\%}. Hypertension was found in 20{\%}, and 19{\%} were current cigarette smokers. Based on the clustering of risk factors, 42{\%} of the participants were at increased CVD risk: 15{\%} of ambulatory participants and 61{\%} of nonambulatory participants (P=.03). Adjusted for sex and ambulatory status, participants with higher aerobic fitness tended to be more likely to have no CVD risk (odds ratio=13.0; P=.07). CVD risk was not associated to physical activity and body fat.CONCLUSIONS: A large proportion of the study sample was at CVD risk, indicated by clustering of risk factors. Improving aerobic fitness in young adults with MMC may contribute in reducing CVD risk; this needs to be confirmed in future studies.",
keywords = "Adiposity, Adolescent, Adult, Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control, Cross-Sectional Studies, Exercise, Female, Humans, Life Style, Logistic Models, Male, Meningomyelocele/rehabilitation, Mobility Limitation, Netherlands, Physical Fitness, Risk Factors, Spina Bifida Cystica/rehabilitation",
author = "Buffart, {Laurien M} and {van den Berg-Emons}, {Rita J} and Alex Burdorf and Janssen, {Wim G} and Stam, {Henk J} and Roebroeck, {Marij E}",
year = "2008",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.apmr.2008.04.015",
language = "English",
volume = "89",
pages = "2167--73",
journal = "Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation",
issn = "0003-9993",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "11",

}

Cardiovascular disease risk factors and the relationships with physical activity, aerobic fitness, and body fat in adolescents and young adults with myelomeningocele. / Buffart, Laurien M; van den Berg-Emons, Rita J; Burdorf, Alex; Janssen, Wim G; Stam, Henk J; Roebroeck, Marij E.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 89, No. 11, 11.2008, p. 2167-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cardiovascular disease risk factors and the relationships with physical activity, aerobic fitness, and body fat in adolescents and young adults with myelomeningocele

AU - Buffart, Laurien M

AU - van den Berg-Emons, Rita J

AU - Burdorf, Alex

AU - Janssen, Wim G

AU - Stam, Henk J

AU - Roebroeck, Marij E

PY - 2008/11

Y1 - 2008/11

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To describe cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in adolescents and young adults with myelomeningocele (MMC) and to explore relationships with physical activity, aerobic fitness, and body fat.DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.SETTING: Outpatient clinic.PARTICIPANTS: Adolescents and young adults (N=31) with MMC (58% men) age 16 through 30 years; 13 were ambulatory and 18 were nonambulatory.INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We studied biologic and lifestyle-related CVD risk factors, including lipid and lipoprotein profiles, blood pressure, aerobic fitness (Vo(2)peak), body fat, daily physical activity, and smoking behavior. We considered subjects at increased CVD risk when 2 or more of the following risk factors clustered: systolic blood pressure, total serum cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and cigarette smoking. Relationships were studied using regression analyses.RESULTS: Levels of TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides were elevated in 29%, 38%, and 3% of the participants, respectively. HDL-C was reduced in 19%. Hypertension was found in 20%, and 19% were current cigarette smokers. Based on the clustering of risk factors, 42% of the participants were at increased CVD risk: 15% of ambulatory participants and 61% of nonambulatory participants (P=.03). Adjusted for sex and ambulatory status, participants with higher aerobic fitness tended to be more likely to have no CVD risk (odds ratio=13.0; P=.07). CVD risk was not associated to physical activity and body fat.CONCLUSIONS: A large proportion of the study sample was at CVD risk, indicated by clustering of risk factors. Improving aerobic fitness in young adults with MMC may contribute in reducing CVD risk; this needs to be confirmed in future studies.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To describe cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in adolescents and young adults with myelomeningocele (MMC) and to explore relationships with physical activity, aerobic fitness, and body fat.DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.SETTING: Outpatient clinic.PARTICIPANTS: Adolescents and young adults (N=31) with MMC (58% men) age 16 through 30 years; 13 were ambulatory and 18 were nonambulatory.INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We studied biologic and lifestyle-related CVD risk factors, including lipid and lipoprotein profiles, blood pressure, aerobic fitness (Vo(2)peak), body fat, daily physical activity, and smoking behavior. We considered subjects at increased CVD risk when 2 or more of the following risk factors clustered: systolic blood pressure, total serum cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and cigarette smoking. Relationships were studied using regression analyses.RESULTS: Levels of TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides were elevated in 29%, 38%, and 3% of the participants, respectively. HDL-C was reduced in 19%. Hypertension was found in 20%, and 19% were current cigarette smokers. Based on the clustering of risk factors, 42% of the participants were at increased CVD risk: 15% of ambulatory participants and 61% of nonambulatory participants (P=.03). Adjusted for sex and ambulatory status, participants with higher aerobic fitness tended to be more likely to have no CVD risk (odds ratio=13.0; P=.07). CVD risk was not associated to physical activity and body fat.CONCLUSIONS: A large proportion of the study sample was at CVD risk, indicated by clustering of risk factors. Improving aerobic fitness in young adults with MMC may contribute in reducing CVD risk; this needs to be confirmed in future studies.

KW - Adiposity

KW - Adolescent

KW - Adult

KW - Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control

KW - Cross-Sectional Studies

KW - Exercise

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Life Style

KW - Logistic Models

KW - Male

KW - Meningomyelocele/rehabilitation

KW - Mobility Limitation

KW - Netherlands

KW - Physical Fitness

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Spina Bifida Cystica/rehabilitation

U2 - 10.1016/j.apmr.2008.04.015

DO - 10.1016/j.apmr.2008.04.015

M3 - Article

VL - 89

SP - 2167

EP - 2173

JO - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

JF - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

SN - 0003-9993

IS - 11

ER -