Changes in employment status, barriers to, and facilitators of (return to) work in breast cancer survivors 5–10 years after diagnosis

Pomme E. A. van Maarschalkerweerd, Michael Schaapveld, Carmen H. Paalman, Neil K. Aaronson, Saskia F. A. Duijts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To qualitatively investigate changes in employment status, barriers to and facilitators of (return to) work in breast cancer survivors 5–10 years after diagnosis. Materials and methods: Women were eligible to participate in the focus groups if they were younger than 55 years and were employed at time of diagnosis. Data were analysed by two independent researchers using thematic content analysis. Results: Nineteen women participated in three semi-structured focus groups, of whom 18 reported a change in employment status 5–10 years after diagnosis. Perceived barriers to (return to) work shortly after breast cancer diagnosis tended to be disease- and treatment-related, while 5–10 years later, they were personal- and work-related. Participants recommended open communication and support at the workplace, and comprehensive information from (occupational) health care professionals to facilitate dealing with breast cancer at work. Conclusions: Breast cancer survivors still experience changes in employment status 5–10 years after diagnosis. (Occupational) health care professionals should be alert that perceived barriers for returning to work change over time. Future research should focus on increasing awareness (at work) of breast cancer survivors’ needs, providing adequate information and support to all involved, and developing interventions to sustain survivors’ work ability at the long term.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Even long after diagnosis and treatment, a sizeable number of breast cancer survivors report a change in employment status, such as job loss. (Occupational) health care professionals should be alert that barriers for returning to work and retaining work change over time. There is a lack of awareness and a shortage of interventions regarding work-related issues for breast cancer survivors at long-term follow-up.
Original languageEnglish
JournalDisability and Rehabilitation
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Cite this

@article{d3b8c4c1df634d5cae63836771da5afb,
title = "Changes in employment status, barriers to, and facilitators of (return to) work in breast cancer survivors 5–10 years after diagnosis",
abstract = "Purpose: To qualitatively investigate changes in employment status, barriers to and facilitators of (return to) work in breast cancer survivors 5–10 years after diagnosis. Materials and methods: Women were eligible to participate in the focus groups if they were younger than 55 years and were employed at time of diagnosis. Data were analysed by two independent researchers using thematic content analysis. Results: Nineteen women participated in three semi-structured focus groups, of whom 18 reported a change in employment status 5–10 years after diagnosis. Perceived barriers to (return to) work shortly after breast cancer diagnosis tended to be disease- and treatment-related, while 5–10 years later, they were personal- and work-related. Participants recommended open communication and support at the workplace, and comprehensive information from (occupational) health care professionals to facilitate dealing with breast cancer at work. Conclusions: Breast cancer survivors still experience changes in employment status 5–10 years after diagnosis. (Occupational) health care professionals should be alert that perceived barriers for returning to work change over time. Future research should focus on increasing awareness (at work) of breast cancer survivors’ needs, providing adequate information and support to all involved, and developing interventions to sustain survivors’ work ability at the long term.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Even long after diagnosis and treatment, a sizeable number of breast cancer survivors report a change in employment status, such as job loss. (Occupational) health care professionals should be alert that barriers for returning to work and retaining work change over time. There is a lack of awareness and a shortage of interventions regarding work-related issues for breast cancer survivors at long-term follow-up.",
author = "{van Maarschalkerweerd}, {Pomme E. A.} and Michael Schaapveld and Paalman, {Carmen H.} and Aaronson, {Neil K.} and Duijts, {Saskia F. A.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/09638288.2019.1583779",
language = "English",
journal = "Disability and Rehabilitation",
issn = "0963-8288",
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Changes in employment status, barriers to, and facilitators of (return to) work in breast cancer survivors 5–10 years after diagnosis. / van Maarschalkerweerd, Pomme E. A.; Schaapveld, Michael; Paalman, Carmen H.; Aaronson, Neil K.; Duijts, Saskia F. A.

In: Disability and Rehabilitation, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Changes in employment status, barriers to, and facilitators of (return to) work in breast cancer survivors 5–10 years after diagnosis

AU - van Maarschalkerweerd, Pomme E. A.

AU - Schaapveld, Michael

AU - Paalman, Carmen H.

AU - Aaronson, Neil K.

AU - Duijts, Saskia F. A.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Purpose: To qualitatively investigate changes in employment status, barriers to and facilitators of (return to) work in breast cancer survivors 5–10 years after diagnosis. Materials and methods: Women were eligible to participate in the focus groups if they were younger than 55 years and were employed at time of diagnosis. Data were analysed by two independent researchers using thematic content analysis. Results: Nineteen women participated in three semi-structured focus groups, of whom 18 reported a change in employment status 5–10 years after diagnosis. Perceived barriers to (return to) work shortly after breast cancer diagnosis tended to be disease- and treatment-related, while 5–10 years later, they were personal- and work-related. Participants recommended open communication and support at the workplace, and comprehensive information from (occupational) health care professionals to facilitate dealing with breast cancer at work. Conclusions: Breast cancer survivors still experience changes in employment status 5–10 years after diagnosis. (Occupational) health care professionals should be alert that perceived barriers for returning to work change over time. Future research should focus on increasing awareness (at work) of breast cancer survivors’ needs, providing adequate information and support to all involved, and developing interventions to sustain survivors’ work ability at the long term.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Even long after diagnosis and treatment, a sizeable number of breast cancer survivors report a change in employment status, such as job loss. (Occupational) health care professionals should be alert that barriers for returning to work and retaining work change over time. There is a lack of awareness and a shortage of interventions regarding work-related issues for breast cancer survivors at long-term follow-up.

AB - Purpose: To qualitatively investigate changes in employment status, barriers to and facilitators of (return to) work in breast cancer survivors 5–10 years after diagnosis. Materials and methods: Women were eligible to participate in the focus groups if they were younger than 55 years and were employed at time of diagnosis. Data were analysed by two independent researchers using thematic content analysis. Results: Nineteen women participated in three semi-structured focus groups, of whom 18 reported a change in employment status 5–10 years after diagnosis. Perceived barriers to (return to) work shortly after breast cancer diagnosis tended to be disease- and treatment-related, while 5–10 years later, they were personal- and work-related. Participants recommended open communication and support at the workplace, and comprehensive information from (occupational) health care professionals to facilitate dealing with breast cancer at work. Conclusions: Breast cancer survivors still experience changes in employment status 5–10 years after diagnosis. (Occupational) health care professionals should be alert that perceived barriers for returning to work change over time. Future research should focus on increasing awareness (at work) of breast cancer survivors’ needs, providing adequate information and support to all involved, and developing interventions to sustain survivors’ work ability at the long term.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Even long after diagnosis and treatment, a sizeable number of breast cancer survivors report a change in employment status, such as job loss. (Occupational) health care professionals should be alert that barriers for returning to work and retaining work change over time. There is a lack of awareness and a shortage of interventions regarding work-related issues for breast cancer survivors at long-term follow-up.

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UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30907148

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