Child and parent perceived determinants of children’s inadequate sleep health. A concept mapping study

Laura S. Belmon*, Vincent Busch, Maartje M. van Stralen, Dominique P.M. Stijnman, Lisan M. Hidding, Irene A. Harmsen, Mai J.M. Chinapaw

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Many children do not meet the recommendations for healthy sleep, which is concerning given the potential negative effects on children’s health. To promote healthy sleep, it is crucial to understand its determinants. This concept mapping study therefore explores perspectives of children and parents on potential determinants of children’s inadequate sleep. The focus lies on 9– 12 year old children (n = 45), and their parents (n = 33), from low socioeconomic neighbourhoods, as these children run a higher risk of living in a sleep-disturbing environment (e.g., worries, noise). All participants generated potential reasons (i.e., ideas) for children’s inadequate sleep. Next, participants sorted all ideas by relatedness and rated their importance. Subsequently, multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analyses were performed to create clusters of ideas for children and parents separately. Children and parents both identified psychological (i.e., fear, affective state, stressful situation), social environmental (i.e., sleep schedule, family sleep habits), behavioural (i.e., screen behaviour, physical activity, diet), physical environmental (i.e., sleep environment such as temperature, noise, light), and physiological (i.e., physical well-being) determinants. These insights may be valuable for the development of future healthy sleep interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1583
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2020

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