Classical and model-based estimates of beta-cell function during a mixed meal vs. an OGTT in a population-based cohort

J.M. Rijkelijkhuizen, C.J. Girman, A. Mari, M.J. Alssema, T. Rhodes, M.G.A.A.M. Nijpels, P.J. Kostense, E.M.W. Eekhoff, P.P. Stein, R.J. Heine, J.M. Dekker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This study compared classical and model-based beta-cell responses during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and a meal tolerance test (MTT) in a population-based cohort. Individuals with normal glucose metabolism (NGM, n=161), impaired glucose metabolism (IGM, n=19) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, n=20) underwent a 75 g-OGTT and an MTT (75 g carbohydrates, 50 g fat, 24 g proteins). Classical estimates of beta-cell function (insulinogenic index and the ratio of areas under insulin and glucose curves) were calculated. Mathematical modelling was used to determine beta-cell glucose sensitivity, rate sensitivity and potentiation. Insulin sensitivity was characterized by three surrogate estimates. Both classical and model-based estimates of beta-cell function were higher during MTT than during OGTT (P
Original languageUndefined/Unknown
Pages (from-to)280-288
JournalDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Volume83
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Cite this

@article{3dfa3628f3d14fe89b1cce7c4ebeb314,
title = "Classical and model-based estimates of beta-cell function during a mixed meal vs. an OGTT in a population-based cohort",
abstract = "This study compared classical and model-based beta-cell responses during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and a meal tolerance test (MTT) in a population-based cohort. Individuals with normal glucose metabolism (NGM, n=161), impaired glucose metabolism (IGM, n=19) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, n=20) underwent a 75 g-OGTT and an MTT (75 g carbohydrates, 50 g fat, 24 g proteins). Classical estimates of beta-cell function (insulinogenic index and the ratio of areas under insulin and glucose curves) were calculated. Mathematical modelling was used to determine beta-cell glucose sensitivity, rate sensitivity and potentiation. Insulin sensitivity was characterized by three surrogate estimates. Both classical and model-based estimates of beta-cell function were higher during MTT than during OGTT (P",
author = "J.M. Rijkelijkhuizen and C.J. Girman and A. Mari and M.J. Alssema and T. Rhodes and M.G.A.A.M. Nijpels and P.J. Kostense and E.M.W. Eekhoff and P.P. Stein and R.J. Heine and J.M. Dekker",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1016/j.diabres.2008.11.017",
language = "Undefined/Unknown",
volume = "83",
pages = "280--288",
journal = "Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice",
issn = "0168-8227",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "2",

}

Classical and model-based estimates of beta-cell function during a mixed meal vs. an OGTT in a population-based cohort. / Rijkelijkhuizen, J.M.; Girman, C.J.; Mari, A.; Alssema, M.J.; Rhodes, T.; Nijpels, M.G.A.A.M.; Kostense, P.J.; Eekhoff, E.M.W.; Stein, P.P.; Heine, R.J.; Dekker, J.M.

In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, Vol. 83, No. 2, 2009, p. 280-288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Classical and model-based estimates of beta-cell function during a mixed meal vs. an OGTT in a population-based cohort

AU - Rijkelijkhuizen, J.M.

AU - Girman, C.J.

AU - Mari, A.

AU - Alssema, M.J.

AU - Rhodes, T.

AU - Nijpels, M.G.A.A.M.

AU - Kostense, P.J.

AU - Eekhoff, E.M.W.

AU - Stein, P.P.

AU - Heine, R.J.

AU - Dekker, J.M.

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - This study compared classical and model-based beta-cell responses during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and a meal tolerance test (MTT) in a population-based cohort. Individuals with normal glucose metabolism (NGM, n=161), impaired glucose metabolism (IGM, n=19) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, n=20) underwent a 75 g-OGTT and an MTT (75 g carbohydrates, 50 g fat, 24 g proteins). Classical estimates of beta-cell function (insulinogenic index and the ratio of areas under insulin and glucose curves) were calculated. Mathematical modelling was used to determine beta-cell glucose sensitivity, rate sensitivity and potentiation. Insulin sensitivity was characterized by three surrogate estimates. Both classical and model-based estimates of beta-cell function were higher during MTT than during OGTT (P

AB - This study compared classical and model-based beta-cell responses during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and a meal tolerance test (MTT) in a population-based cohort. Individuals with normal glucose metabolism (NGM, n=161), impaired glucose metabolism (IGM, n=19) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, n=20) underwent a 75 g-OGTT and an MTT (75 g carbohydrates, 50 g fat, 24 g proteins). Classical estimates of beta-cell function (insulinogenic index and the ratio of areas under insulin and glucose curves) were calculated. Mathematical modelling was used to determine beta-cell glucose sensitivity, rate sensitivity and potentiation. Insulin sensitivity was characterized by three surrogate estimates. Both classical and model-based estimates of beta-cell function were higher during MTT than during OGTT (P

U2 - 10.1016/j.diabres.2008.11.017

DO - 10.1016/j.diabres.2008.11.017

M3 - Article

VL - 83

SP - 280

EP - 288

JO - Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice

JF - Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice

SN - 0168-8227

IS - 2

ER -