Coaching behaviours and learning resources; influence on rugby players’ attitudes towards injury prevention and performance in the tackle

Sharief Hendricks, Steve den Hollander, Mike Lambert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To determine how players’ attitudes towards injury prevention and performance in the tackle can be influenced by coaching and learning resources.Methods: A questionnaire assessed (i) the attitudes of rugby players (N=164) towards injury prevention and performance, and (ii) reported tackle coaching behaviours and learning resources.Results: Time spent emphasising proper technique to prevent injuries was associated with how important players rated injury prevention χ2=(df 16, N=159) 29.13, p=0.023, Cramer’s V=0.21, moderate). Identifying a problem and providing verbal instruction and demonstration were associated with performance, while verbal instruction was associated with how important players rated injury prevention during tackle training (individual χ2=(df 16, N=156) 30.41, p=0.016, Cramer’s V=0.22, moderate; team χ2=(df 16, N=156) 34.05, p=0.005, Cramer’s V=0.23, moderate).Conclusion: The time coaches spent emphasising proper technique for injury prevention and performance was positively associated with how important players rated the tackle training objective. Verbal instruction was the only coaching method associated with how important players rated injury prevention. Training books, training videos and coaching clinics have the most influence on players’ attitude towards injury prevention and performance in the tackle. Coaches and rugby injury prevention programmes can apply these findings to optimise safe and effective tackle training.
Original languageEnglish
JournalScience and Medicine in Football
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Cite this

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title = "Coaching behaviours and learning resources; influence on rugby players’ attitudes towards injury prevention and performance in the tackle",
abstract = "Purpose: To determine how players’ attitudes towards injury prevention and performance in the tackle can be influenced by coaching and learning resources.Methods: A questionnaire assessed (i) the attitudes of rugby players (N=164) towards injury prevention and performance, and (ii) reported tackle coaching behaviours and learning resources.Results: Time spent emphasising proper technique to prevent injuries was associated with how important players rated injury prevention χ2=(df 16, N=159) 29.13, p=0.023, Cramer’s V=0.21, moderate). Identifying a problem and providing verbal instruction and demonstration were associated with performance, while verbal instruction was associated with how important players rated injury prevention during tackle training (individual χ2=(df 16, N=156) 30.41, p=0.016, Cramer’s V=0.22, moderate; team χ2=(df 16, N=156) 34.05, p=0.005, Cramer’s V=0.23, moderate).Conclusion: The time coaches spent emphasising proper technique for injury prevention and performance was positively associated with how important players rated the tackle training objective. Verbal instruction was the only coaching method associated with how important players rated injury prevention. Training books, training videos and coaching clinics have the most influence on players’ attitude towards injury prevention and performance in the tackle. Coaches and rugby injury prevention programmes can apply these findings to optimise safe and effective tackle training.",
author = "Sharief Hendricks and {den Hollander}, Steve and Mike Lambert",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1080/24733938.2019.1633470",
language = "English",
journal = "Science and Medicine in Football",
issn = "2473-3938",

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Coaching behaviours and learning resources; influence on rugby players’ attitudes towards injury prevention and performance in the tackle. / Hendricks, Sharief; den Hollander, Steve; Lambert, Mike.

In: Science and Medicine in Football, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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N2 - Purpose: To determine how players’ attitudes towards injury prevention and performance in the tackle can be influenced by coaching and learning resources.Methods: A questionnaire assessed (i) the attitudes of rugby players (N=164) towards injury prevention and performance, and (ii) reported tackle coaching behaviours and learning resources.Results: Time spent emphasising proper technique to prevent injuries was associated with how important players rated injury prevention χ2=(df 16, N=159) 29.13, p=0.023, Cramer’s V=0.21, moderate). Identifying a problem and providing verbal instruction and demonstration were associated with performance, while verbal instruction was associated with how important players rated injury prevention during tackle training (individual χ2=(df 16, N=156) 30.41, p=0.016, Cramer’s V=0.22, moderate; team χ2=(df 16, N=156) 34.05, p=0.005, Cramer’s V=0.23, moderate).Conclusion: The time coaches spent emphasising proper technique for injury prevention and performance was positively associated with how important players rated the tackle training objective. Verbal instruction was the only coaching method associated with how important players rated injury prevention. Training books, training videos and coaching clinics have the most influence on players’ attitude towards injury prevention and performance in the tackle. Coaches and rugby injury prevention programmes can apply these findings to optimise safe and effective tackle training.

AB - Purpose: To determine how players’ attitudes towards injury prevention and performance in the tackle can be influenced by coaching and learning resources.Methods: A questionnaire assessed (i) the attitudes of rugby players (N=164) towards injury prevention and performance, and (ii) reported tackle coaching behaviours and learning resources.Results: Time spent emphasising proper technique to prevent injuries was associated with how important players rated injury prevention χ2=(df 16, N=159) 29.13, p=0.023, Cramer’s V=0.21, moderate). Identifying a problem and providing verbal instruction and demonstration were associated with performance, while verbal instruction was associated with how important players rated injury prevention during tackle training (individual χ2=(df 16, N=156) 30.41, p=0.016, Cramer’s V=0.22, moderate; team χ2=(df 16, N=156) 34.05, p=0.005, Cramer’s V=0.23, moderate).Conclusion: The time coaches spent emphasising proper technique for injury prevention and performance was positively associated with how important players rated the tackle training objective. Verbal instruction was the only coaching method associated with how important players rated injury prevention. Training books, training videos and coaching clinics have the most influence on players’ attitude towards injury prevention and performance in the tackle. Coaches and rugby injury prevention programmes can apply these findings to optimise safe and effective tackle training.

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