Creatine kinase and blood pressure in women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: High plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity is associated with hypertension in the general and pregnant population. We hypothesize that women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia are prone to hypertension due to a high CK activity level. Study design: Nine to 16 years after pregnancy, serum CK activity and blood pressure were measured in 117 women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia and 50 women with a history of an uncomplicated pregnancy. Main outcome measures: CK activity levels of the two groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. The association between CK activity and blood pressure was evaluated by means of multivariable regression analysis. Results: There was no significant difference in median (interquartile range) CK activity between women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia and an uncomplicated pregnancy (59.00 [47.00–85.00] vs. 58.00 [46.50–75.25], respectively, p = 0.774). The association between CK and systolic blood pressure was significant in women with a pregnancy history of early-onset preeclampsia (regression coefficient [95% confidence interval]: 0.123 mmHg [0.020–0.226], p = 0.019), and a trend was found for diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.069). CK and blood pressure were not significantly associated in women with a history of an uncomplicated pregnancy. Conclusions: Median CK did not significantly differ between the two groups. Serum CK activity was significantly associated with systolic blood pressure in women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia. These data suggest that CK is not a predominant factor in the increased risk of hypertension in women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)118-122
JournalPregnancy Hypertension
Volume15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Cite this

@article{dc8af98e45034f59abec809b0a05032f,
title = "Creatine kinase and blood pressure in women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia",
abstract = "Objectives: High plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity is associated with hypertension in the general and pregnant population. We hypothesize that women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia are prone to hypertension due to a high CK activity level. Study design: Nine to 16 years after pregnancy, serum CK activity and blood pressure were measured in 117 women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia and 50 women with a history of an uncomplicated pregnancy. Main outcome measures: CK activity levels of the two groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. The association between CK activity and blood pressure was evaluated by means of multivariable regression analysis. Results: There was no significant difference in median (interquartile range) CK activity between women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia and an uncomplicated pregnancy (59.00 [47.00–85.00] vs. 58.00 [46.50–75.25], respectively, p = 0.774). The association between CK and systolic blood pressure was significant in women with a pregnancy history of early-onset preeclampsia (regression coefficient [95{\%} confidence interval]: 0.123 mmHg [0.020–0.226], p = 0.019), and a trend was found for diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.069). CK and blood pressure were not significantly associated in women with a history of an uncomplicated pregnancy. Conclusions: Median CK did not significantly differ between the two groups. Serum CK activity was significantly associated with systolic blood pressure in women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia. These data suggest that CK is not a predominant factor in the increased risk of hypertension in women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia.",
author = "Horjus, {Deborah L.} and Anouk Bokslag and Femke Hooijberg and Hutten, {Barbara A.} and Saskia Middeldorp and {de Groot}, {Christianne J. M.}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1016/j.preghy.2018.12.009",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "118--122",
journal = "Pregnancy Hypertension",
issn = "2210-7789",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

Creatine kinase and blood pressure in women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia. / Horjus, Deborah L.; Bokslag, Anouk; Hooijberg, Femke; Hutten, Barbara A.; Middeldorp, Saskia; de Groot, Christianne J. M.

In: Pregnancy Hypertension, Vol. 15, 2019, p. 118-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Creatine kinase and blood pressure in women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia

AU - Horjus, Deborah L.

AU - Bokslag, Anouk

AU - Hooijberg, Femke

AU - Hutten, Barbara A.

AU - Middeldorp, Saskia

AU - de Groot, Christianne J. M.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Objectives: High plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity is associated with hypertension in the general and pregnant population. We hypothesize that women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia are prone to hypertension due to a high CK activity level. Study design: Nine to 16 years after pregnancy, serum CK activity and blood pressure were measured in 117 women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia and 50 women with a history of an uncomplicated pregnancy. Main outcome measures: CK activity levels of the two groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. The association between CK activity and blood pressure was evaluated by means of multivariable regression analysis. Results: There was no significant difference in median (interquartile range) CK activity between women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia and an uncomplicated pregnancy (59.00 [47.00–85.00] vs. 58.00 [46.50–75.25], respectively, p = 0.774). The association between CK and systolic blood pressure was significant in women with a pregnancy history of early-onset preeclampsia (regression coefficient [95% confidence interval]: 0.123 mmHg [0.020–0.226], p = 0.019), and a trend was found for diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.069). CK and blood pressure were not significantly associated in women with a history of an uncomplicated pregnancy. Conclusions: Median CK did not significantly differ between the two groups. Serum CK activity was significantly associated with systolic blood pressure in women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia. These data suggest that CK is not a predominant factor in the increased risk of hypertension in women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia.

AB - Objectives: High plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity is associated with hypertension in the general and pregnant population. We hypothesize that women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia are prone to hypertension due to a high CK activity level. Study design: Nine to 16 years after pregnancy, serum CK activity and blood pressure were measured in 117 women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia and 50 women with a history of an uncomplicated pregnancy. Main outcome measures: CK activity levels of the two groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. The association between CK activity and blood pressure was evaluated by means of multivariable regression analysis. Results: There was no significant difference in median (interquartile range) CK activity between women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia and an uncomplicated pregnancy (59.00 [47.00–85.00] vs. 58.00 [46.50–75.25], respectively, p = 0.774). The association between CK and systolic blood pressure was significant in women with a pregnancy history of early-onset preeclampsia (regression coefficient [95% confidence interval]: 0.123 mmHg [0.020–0.226], p = 0.019), and a trend was found for diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.069). CK and blood pressure were not significantly associated in women with a history of an uncomplicated pregnancy. Conclusions: Median CK did not significantly differ between the two groups. Serum CK activity was significantly associated with systolic blood pressure in women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia. These data suggest that CK is not a predominant factor in the increased risk of hypertension in women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia.

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UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30825907

U2 - 10.1016/j.preghy.2018.12.009

DO - 10.1016/j.preghy.2018.12.009

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 118

EP - 122

JO - Pregnancy Hypertension

JF - Pregnancy Hypertension

SN - 2210-7789

ER -