Crizotinib treatment for patients with EGFR mutation positive NSCLC that acquire cMET amplification after EGFR TKI therapy results in short-lived and heterogeneous responses

Bianca van Veggel, Adrianus J. de Langen, Sayed Hashemi, Kim Monkhorst, Efraim H. Rosenberg, Daniëlle A. M. Heideman, Teodora Radonic, Egbert F. Smit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Next to secondary epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, cMET amplification plays an important role in mediating acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) treatment. Crizotinib, a dual ALK and cMET inhibitor, can induce responses in patients with EGFR mutation positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that acquire cMET amplification after EGFR TKI treatment. However, little is known about the duration of response and post-progression resistance mechanisms. Here, we report on the clinical outcome of a series of patients with cMET-driven resistance to EGFR TKIs, treated with crizotinib. Materials and methods: Eight patients with EGFR mutation positive NSCLC that acquired cMET amplification after EGFR TKI treatment were treated with crizotinib 250 mg twice daily, as monotherapy (n = 2) or in combination with an EGFR TKI (n = 6). Results: Four out of eight patients (50%) showed a partial response (PR) according to RECIST 1.1. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 1.4 (95% CI 1.2–5.0) months. Responses were short-lasting with a median PFS of 3.5 (95% CI 1.4–5.2) months in patients with a PR. Median overall survival was 5.9 (95% CI 1.3–6.0) months and not statistically different between responders and non-responders (p = 0.37). All but one patient tolerated crizotinib treatment well. Heterogeneous responses were seen in patients with progressive disease as best response with a marked size decrease of the biopsied (cMET amplification positive) lesion and progression of other lesions. cMET amplification was not always mutually exclusive with other EGFR TKI resistance mechanisms. Post-progression biopsies were negative for cMET amplification. Conclusion: Crizotinib treatment for patients with EGFR mutation positive NSCLC that acquire cMET amplification after EGFR TKI treatment results in short-lived and often heterogeneous responses, possibly due to subclonality of cMET-driven resistance and co-occurrence of other EGFR TKI resistance mechanisms.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)130-134
Number of pages5
JournalLung Cancer
Volume124
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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