Do host genetic traits in the bacterial sensing system play a role in the development of Chlamydia trachomatis-associated tubal pathology in subfertile women?

Janneke E den Hartog, Sander Ouburg, Jolande A Land, Joseph M Lyons, James I Ito, A Salvador Peña, Servaas A Morré

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In women, Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis upper genital tract infection can cause distal tubal damage and occlusion, increasing the risk of tubal factor subfertility and ectopic pregnancy. Variations, like single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in immunologically important host genes are assumed to play a role in the course and outcome of a C. trachomatis infection. We studied whether genetic traits (carrying multiple SNPs in different genes) in the bacterial sensing system are associated with an aberrant immune response and subsequently with tubal pathology following a C. trachomatis infection. The genes studied all encode for pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) involved in sensing bacterial components.

METHODS: Of 227 subfertile women, serum was available for C. trachomatis IgG antibody testing and genotyping (common versus rare allele) of the PRR genes TLR9, TLR4, CD14 and CARD15/NOD2. In all women, a laparoscopy was performed to assess the grade of tubal pathology. Tubal pathology was defined as extensive peri-adnexal adhesions and/or distal occlusion of at least one tube.

RESULTS: Following a C. trachomatis infection (i.e. C. trachomatis IgG positive), subfertile women carrying two or more SNPs in C. trachomatis PRR genes were at increased risk of tubal pathology compared to women carrying less than two SNPs (73% vs 33% risk). The differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.15), but a trend was observed.

CONCLUSION: Carrying multiple SNPs in C. trachomatis PRR genes tends to result in an aberrant immune response and a higher risk of tubal pathology following a C. trachomatis infection. Larger studies are needed to confirm our preliminary findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122
JournalBMC Infectious Diseases
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Jul 2006

Cite this

@article{e7a5b9433dbb4116b4acb8dc7b567d5b,
title = "Do host genetic traits in the bacterial sensing system play a role in the development of Chlamydia trachomatis-associated tubal pathology in subfertile women?",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: In women, Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis upper genital tract infection can cause distal tubal damage and occlusion, increasing the risk of tubal factor subfertility and ectopic pregnancy. Variations, like single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in immunologically important host genes are assumed to play a role in the course and outcome of a C. trachomatis infection. We studied whether genetic traits (carrying multiple SNPs in different genes) in the bacterial sensing system are associated with an aberrant immune response and subsequently with tubal pathology following a C. trachomatis infection. The genes studied all encode for pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) involved in sensing bacterial components.METHODS: Of 227 subfertile women, serum was available for C. trachomatis IgG antibody testing and genotyping (common versus rare allele) of the PRR genes TLR9, TLR4, CD14 and CARD15/NOD2. In all women, a laparoscopy was performed to assess the grade of tubal pathology. Tubal pathology was defined as extensive peri-adnexal adhesions and/or distal occlusion of at least one tube.RESULTS: Following a C. trachomatis infection (i.e. C. trachomatis IgG positive), subfertile women carrying two or more SNPs in C. trachomatis PRR genes were at increased risk of tubal pathology compared to women carrying less than two SNPs (73{\%} vs 33{\%} risk). The differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.15), but a trend was observed.CONCLUSION: Carrying multiple SNPs in C. trachomatis PRR genes tends to result in an aberrant immune response and a higher risk of tubal pathology following a C. trachomatis infection. Larger studies are needed to confirm our preliminary findings.",
keywords = "Antibodies, Bacterial/isolation & purification, Chlamydia Infections/genetics, Chlamydia trachomatis/pathogenicity, Fallopian Tubes/microbiology, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Immunoglobulin G/isolation & purification, Infertility, Female/genetics, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics, Lipopolysaccharide Receptors/genetics, Nod2 Signaling Adaptor Protein, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Salpingitis/genetics, Toll-Like Receptor 4/genetics, Toll-Like Receptor 9/genetics",
author = "{den Hartog}, {Janneke E} and Sander Ouburg and Land, {Jolande A} and Lyons, {Joseph M} and Ito, {James I} and Pe{\~n}a, {A Salvador} and Morr{\'e}, {Servaas A}",
year = "2006",
month = "7",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1186/1471-2334-6-122",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "122",
journal = "BMC Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1471-2334",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

Do host genetic traits in the bacterial sensing system play a role in the development of Chlamydia trachomatis-associated tubal pathology in subfertile women? / den Hartog, Janneke E; Ouburg, Sander; Land, Jolande A; Lyons, Joseph M; Ito, James I; Peña, A Salvador; Morré, Servaas A.

In: BMC Infectious Diseases, Vol. 6, 21.07.2006, p. 122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do host genetic traits in the bacterial sensing system play a role in the development of Chlamydia trachomatis-associated tubal pathology in subfertile women?

AU - den Hartog, Janneke E

AU - Ouburg, Sander

AU - Land, Jolande A

AU - Lyons, Joseph M

AU - Ito, James I

AU - Peña, A Salvador

AU - Morré, Servaas A

PY - 2006/7/21

Y1 - 2006/7/21

N2 - BACKGROUND: In women, Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis upper genital tract infection can cause distal tubal damage and occlusion, increasing the risk of tubal factor subfertility and ectopic pregnancy. Variations, like single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in immunologically important host genes are assumed to play a role in the course and outcome of a C. trachomatis infection. We studied whether genetic traits (carrying multiple SNPs in different genes) in the bacterial sensing system are associated with an aberrant immune response and subsequently with tubal pathology following a C. trachomatis infection. The genes studied all encode for pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) involved in sensing bacterial components.METHODS: Of 227 subfertile women, serum was available for C. trachomatis IgG antibody testing and genotyping (common versus rare allele) of the PRR genes TLR9, TLR4, CD14 and CARD15/NOD2. In all women, a laparoscopy was performed to assess the grade of tubal pathology. Tubal pathology was defined as extensive peri-adnexal adhesions and/or distal occlusion of at least one tube.RESULTS: Following a C. trachomatis infection (i.e. C. trachomatis IgG positive), subfertile women carrying two or more SNPs in C. trachomatis PRR genes were at increased risk of tubal pathology compared to women carrying less than two SNPs (73% vs 33% risk). The differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.15), but a trend was observed.CONCLUSION: Carrying multiple SNPs in C. trachomatis PRR genes tends to result in an aberrant immune response and a higher risk of tubal pathology following a C. trachomatis infection. Larger studies are needed to confirm our preliminary findings.

AB - BACKGROUND: In women, Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis upper genital tract infection can cause distal tubal damage and occlusion, increasing the risk of tubal factor subfertility and ectopic pregnancy. Variations, like single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in immunologically important host genes are assumed to play a role in the course and outcome of a C. trachomatis infection. We studied whether genetic traits (carrying multiple SNPs in different genes) in the bacterial sensing system are associated with an aberrant immune response and subsequently with tubal pathology following a C. trachomatis infection. The genes studied all encode for pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) involved in sensing bacterial components.METHODS: Of 227 subfertile women, serum was available for C. trachomatis IgG antibody testing and genotyping (common versus rare allele) of the PRR genes TLR9, TLR4, CD14 and CARD15/NOD2. In all women, a laparoscopy was performed to assess the grade of tubal pathology. Tubal pathology was defined as extensive peri-adnexal adhesions and/or distal occlusion of at least one tube.RESULTS: Following a C. trachomatis infection (i.e. C. trachomatis IgG positive), subfertile women carrying two or more SNPs in C. trachomatis PRR genes were at increased risk of tubal pathology compared to women carrying less than two SNPs (73% vs 33% risk). The differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.15), but a trend was observed.CONCLUSION: Carrying multiple SNPs in C. trachomatis PRR genes tends to result in an aberrant immune response and a higher risk of tubal pathology following a C. trachomatis infection. Larger studies are needed to confirm our preliminary findings.

KW - Antibodies, Bacterial/isolation & purification

KW - Chlamydia Infections/genetics

KW - Chlamydia trachomatis/pathogenicity

KW - Fallopian Tubes/microbiology

KW - Female

KW - Genetic Predisposition to Disease

KW - Humans

KW - Immunoglobulin G/isolation & purification

KW - Infertility, Female/genetics

KW - Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics

KW - Lipopolysaccharide Receptors/genetics

KW - Nod2 Signaling Adaptor Protein

KW - Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide

KW - Salpingitis/genetics

KW - Toll-Like Receptor 4/genetics

KW - Toll-Like Receptor 9/genetics

U2 - 10.1186/1471-2334-6-122

DO - 10.1186/1471-2334-6-122

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 122

JO - BMC Infectious Diseases

JF - BMC Infectious Diseases

SN - 1471-2334

ER -