Does self-perceived health correlate with physician-assessed functional limitations in medical work disability assessments?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Our purpose was to obtain information about the correlation between workers' self-perceived health and physician-assessed functional limitations. We also studied whether this correlation differed between workers with subjective health complaints that cannot (SHC) and those that can be explained (non-SHC) by a well-defined medical disease. Methods: Baseline data of 2040 participants from a prospective cohort study were used for this study. These participants answered a questionnaire on their self-perceived health and received a medical work disability assessment during which physicians reported functional limitations. Pearson correlation analyses were used to calculate correlations between 4 functional limitation factors and 11 self-perceived health factors. For correlations with coefficients ≥0.30, linear regression analyses were performed to assess possible differences between participants with SHC (n = 363) and those with non-SHC (n = 1677). Results: We found correlations ≥0.30 between two functional limitation factors and six self-perceived health factors for all participants. SHC participants showed lower correlations than the non-SHC participants between the physical functional limitation and the SF-36 self-perceived physical health factors (−0.49, 95% CI −0.56 to −0.41 vs. -0.60, 95% CI -0.62 to −0.57) and between the mental functional limitation and the SF-36 self-perceived mental health factors (−0.30, 95% CI -0.39 to −0.20 vs. -0.40, 95% CI -0.44 to −0.36). Conclusion: Self-perceived health showed overall low to moderate correlations with physician-assessed functional limitations. Some of these correlations were lower for workers with SHC than for those with non-SHC. This may indicate that physicians rely slightly more on well-defined medical complaints within medical work disability assessments.
Original languageEnglish
Article number109792
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume125
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Cite this

@article{dd39efdab43e491996ff3f8c2079663d,
title = "Does self-perceived health correlate with physician-assessed functional limitations in medical work disability assessments?",
abstract = "Objective: Our purpose was to obtain information about the correlation between workers' self-perceived health and physician-assessed functional limitations. We also studied whether this correlation differed between workers with subjective health complaints that cannot (SHC) and those that can be explained (non-SHC) by a well-defined medical disease. Methods: Baseline data of 2040 participants from a prospective cohort study were used for this study. These participants answered a questionnaire on their self-perceived health and received a medical work disability assessment during which physicians reported functional limitations. Pearson correlation analyses were used to calculate correlations between 4 functional limitation factors and 11 self-perceived health factors. For correlations with coefficients ≥0.30, linear regression analyses were performed to assess possible differences between participants with SHC (n = 363) and those with non-SHC (n = 1677). Results: We found correlations ≥0.30 between two functional limitation factors and six self-perceived health factors for all participants. SHC participants showed lower correlations than the non-SHC participants between the physical functional limitation and the SF-36 self-perceived physical health factors (−0.49, 95{\%} CI −0.56 to −0.41 vs. -0.60, 95{\%} CI -0.62 to −0.57) and between the mental functional limitation and the SF-36 self-perceived mental health factors (−0.30, 95{\%} CI -0.39 to −0.20 vs. -0.40, 95{\%} CI -0.44 to −0.36). Conclusion: Self-perceived health showed overall low to moderate correlations with physician-assessed functional limitations. Some of these correlations were lower for workers with SHC than for those with non-SHC. This may indicate that physicians rely slightly more on well-defined medical complaints within medical work disability assessments.",
author = "Weerdesteijn, {Kristel H. N.} and Schaafsma, {Frederieke G.} and Ilse Louwerse and Huysmans, {Maaike A.} and {van der Beek}, {Allard J.} and Anema, {Johannes R.}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpsychores.2019.109792",
language = "English",
volume = "125",
journal = "Journal of Psychosomatic Research",
issn = "0022-3999",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does self-perceived health correlate with physician-assessed functional limitations in medical work disability assessments?

AU - Weerdesteijn, Kristel H. N.

AU - Schaafsma, Frederieke G.

AU - Louwerse, Ilse

AU - Huysmans, Maaike A.

AU - van der Beek, Allard J.

AU - Anema, Johannes R.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Objective: Our purpose was to obtain information about the correlation between workers' self-perceived health and physician-assessed functional limitations. We also studied whether this correlation differed between workers with subjective health complaints that cannot (SHC) and those that can be explained (non-SHC) by a well-defined medical disease. Methods: Baseline data of 2040 participants from a prospective cohort study were used for this study. These participants answered a questionnaire on their self-perceived health and received a medical work disability assessment during which physicians reported functional limitations. Pearson correlation analyses were used to calculate correlations between 4 functional limitation factors and 11 self-perceived health factors. For correlations with coefficients ≥0.30, linear regression analyses were performed to assess possible differences between participants with SHC (n = 363) and those with non-SHC (n = 1677). Results: We found correlations ≥0.30 between two functional limitation factors and six self-perceived health factors for all participants. SHC participants showed lower correlations than the non-SHC participants between the physical functional limitation and the SF-36 self-perceived physical health factors (−0.49, 95% CI −0.56 to −0.41 vs. -0.60, 95% CI -0.62 to −0.57) and between the mental functional limitation and the SF-36 self-perceived mental health factors (−0.30, 95% CI -0.39 to −0.20 vs. -0.40, 95% CI -0.44 to −0.36). Conclusion: Self-perceived health showed overall low to moderate correlations with physician-assessed functional limitations. Some of these correlations were lower for workers with SHC than for those with non-SHC. This may indicate that physicians rely slightly more on well-defined medical complaints within medical work disability assessments.

AB - Objective: Our purpose was to obtain information about the correlation between workers' self-perceived health and physician-assessed functional limitations. We also studied whether this correlation differed between workers with subjective health complaints that cannot (SHC) and those that can be explained (non-SHC) by a well-defined medical disease. Methods: Baseline data of 2040 participants from a prospective cohort study were used for this study. These participants answered a questionnaire on their self-perceived health and received a medical work disability assessment during which physicians reported functional limitations. Pearson correlation analyses were used to calculate correlations between 4 functional limitation factors and 11 self-perceived health factors. For correlations with coefficients ≥0.30, linear regression analyses were performed to assess possible differences between participants with SHC (n = 363) and those with non-SHC (n = 1677). Results: We found correlations ≥0.30 between two functional limitation factors and six self-perceived health factors for all participants. SHC participants showed lower correlations than the non-SHC participants between the physical functional limitation and the SF-36 self-perceived physical health factors (−0.49, 95% CI −0.56 to −0.41 vs. -0.60, 95% CI -0.62 to −0.57) and between the mental functional limitation and the SF-36 self-perceived mental health factors (−0.30, 95% CI -0.39 to −0.20 vs. -0.40, 95% CI -0.44 to −0.36). Conclusion: Self-perceived health showed overall low to moderate correlations with physician-assessed functional limitations. Some of these correlations were lower for workers with SHC than for those with non-SHC. This may indicate that physicians rely slightly more on well-defined medical complaints within medical work disability assessments.

UR - https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85070635822&origin=inward

UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31421326

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2019.109792

DO - 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2019.109792

M3 - Article

VL - 125

JO - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

JF - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

SN - 0022-3999

M1 - 109792

ER -