Does ultrasonographic foetal head position prior to induction of labour predict the outcome of delivery?

Corine J M Verhoeven, Leon G M Mulders, S Guid Oei, Ben Willem J Mol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the capacity of pre-induction sonographic assessment of occipital position of the foetal head to predict the outcome of delivery, and to assess whether sonographic foetal head position before induction of labour is related to foetal presentation at delivery.

STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study was conducted in the Máxima Medical Centre, The Netherlands. We included consecutive women in whom labour was induced. Immediately prior to induction a transabdominal ultrasound was performed to determine the position of the foetal occiput. The primary outcome was mode of delivery. We recorded maternal demographics, labour and delivery characteristics, maternal and neonatal outcomes. The association between position of the foetal head before induction of labour and the occurrence of caesarean section was addressed using univariable and logistic regression analysis.

RESULTS: From the 50 of the 183 foetuses that started labour in occipitoposterior position, 11 persisted in occipitoposterior position until birth, whereas from the 120 foetuses that were in occipitoanterior position before induction, three children were born in an occipitoposterior position. Although we found a difference in caesarean section rate between OP position and OA position of the foetal head at sonography prior to induction, this was not statistically significant (14% versus 6.7%, OR 2.3, 95% CI 0.78-6.7).

CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates that OP position prior to labour induction does not affect mode of delivery. Sonographic assessment of the position of the foetal head prior to labour induction should not be introduced in clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-7
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology
Volume164
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012

Cite this

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title = "Does ultrasonographic foetal head position prior to induction of labour predict the outcome of delivery?",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To examine the capacity of pre-induction sonographic assessment of occipital position of the foetal head to predict the outcome of delivery, and to assess whether sonographic foetal head position before induction of labour is related to foetal presentation at delivery.STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study was conducted in the M{\'a}xima Medical Centre, The Netherlands. We included consecutive women in whom labour was induced. Immediately prior to induction a transabdominal ultrasound was performed to determine the position of the foetal occiput. The primary outcome was mode of delivery. We recorded maternal demographics, labour and delivery characteristics, maternal and neonatal outcomes. The association between position of the foetal head before induction of labour and the occurrence of caesarean section was addressed using univariable and logistic regression analysis.RESULTS: From the 50 of the 183 foetuses that started labour in occipitoposterior position, 11 persisted in occipitoposterior position until birth, whereas from the 120 foetuses that were in occipitoanterior position before induction, three children were born in an occipitoposterior position. Although we found a difference in caesarean section rate between OP position and OA position of the foetal head at sonography prior to induction, this was not statistically significant (14{\%} versus 6.7{\%}, OR 2.3, 95{\%} CI 0.78-6.7).CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates that OP position prior to labour induction does not affect mode of delivery. Sonographic assessment of the position of the foetal head prior to labour induction should not be introduced in clinical practice.",
keywords = "Adult, Breech Presentation/diagnostic imaging, Cesarean Section, Cohort Studies, Delivery, Obstetric, Early Diagnosis, Female, Head/diagnostic imaging, Humans, Incidence, Labor Presentation, Labor, Induced, Netherlands/epidemiology, Perinatal Care/methods, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Outcome, Prospective Studies, Sensitivity and Specificity, Ultrasonography, Prenatal",
author = "Verhoeven, {Corine J M} and Mulders, {Leon G M} and Oei, {S Guid} and Mol, {Ben Willem J}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2012",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.ejogrb.2012.06.002",
language = "English",
volume = "164",
pages = "133--7",
journal = "European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology",
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Does ultrasonographic foetal head position prior to induction of labour predict the outcome of delivery? / Verhoeven, Corine J M; Mulders, Leon G M; Oei, S Guid; Mol, Ben Willem J.

In: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Vol. 164, No. 2, 10.2012, p. 133-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does ultrasonographic foetal head position prior to induction of labour predict the outcome of delivery?

AU - Verhoeven, Corine J M

AU - Mulders, Leon G M

AU - Oei, S Guid

AU - Mol, Ben Willem J

N1 - Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2012/10

Y1 - 2012/10

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the capacity of pre-induction sonographic assessment of occipital position of the foetal head to predict the outcome of delivery, and to assess whether sonographic foetal head position before induction of labour is related to foetal presentation at delivery.STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study was conducted in the Máxima Medical Centre, The Netherlands. We included consecutive women in whom labour was induced. Immediately prior to induction a transabdominal ultrasound was performed to determine the position of the foetal occiput. The primary outcome was mode of delivery. We recorded maternal demographics, labour and delivery characteristics, maternal and neonatal outcomes. The association between position of the foetal head before induction of labour and the occurrence of caesarean section was addressed using univariable and logistic regression analysis.RESULTS: From the 50 of the 183 foetuses that started labour in occipitoposterior position, 11 persisted in occipitoposterior position until birth, whereas from the 120 foetuses that were in occipitoanterior position before induction, three children were born in an occipitoposterior position. Although we found a difference in caesarean section rate between OP position and OA position of the foetal head at sonography prior to induction, this was not statistically significant (14% versus 6.7%, OR 2.3, 95% CI 0.78-6.7).CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates that OP position prior to labour induction does not affect mode of delivery. Sonographic assessment of the position of the foetal head prior to labour induction should not be introduced in clinical practice.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To examine the capacity of pre-induction sonographic assessment of occipital position of the foetal head to predict the outcome of delivery, and to assess whether sonographic foetal head position before induction of labour is related to foetal presentation at delivery.STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study was conducted in the Máxima Medical Centre, The Netherlands. We included consecutive women in whom labour was induced. Immediately prior to induction a transabdominal ultrasound was performed to determine the position of the foetal occiput. The primary outcome was mode of delivery. We recorded maternal demographics, labour and delivery characteristics, maternal and neonatal outcomes. The association between position of the foetal head before induction of labour and the occurrence of caesarean section was addressed using univariable and logistic regression analysis.RESULTS: From the 50 of the 183 foetuses that started labour in occipitoposterior position, 11 persisted in occipitoposterior position until birth, whereas from the 120 foetuses that were in occipitoanterior position before induction, three children were born in an occipitoposterior position. Although we found a difference in caesarean section rate between OP position and OA position of the foetal head at sonography prior to induction, this was not statistically significant (14% versus 6.7%, OR 2.3, 95% CI 0.78-6.7).CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates that OP position prior to labour induction does not affect mode of delivery. Sonographic assessment of the position of the foetal head prior to labour induction should not be introduced in clinical practice.

KW - Adult

KW - Breech Presentation/diagnostic imaging

KW - Cesarean Section

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Delivery, Obstetric

KW - Early Diagnosis

KW - Female

KW - Head/diagnostic imaging

KW - Humans

KW - Incidence

KW - Labor Presentation

KW - Labor, Induced

KW - Netherlands/epidemiology

KW - Perinatal Care/methods

KW - Pregnancy

KW - Pregnancy Outcome

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Sensitivity and Specificity

KW - Ultrasonography, Prenatal

U2 - 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2012.06.002

DO - 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2012.06.002

M3 - Article

VL - 164

SP - 133

EP - 137

JO - European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology

JF - European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology

SN - 0301-2115

IS - 2

ER -