Abstract

Background & aims: Optimal nutritional support during the acute phase of critical illness remains controversial. We hypothesized that patients with low skeletal muscle area and -density may specifically benefit from early high protein intake. Aim of the present study was to determine the association between early protein intake (day 2–4) and mortality in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients with normal skeletal muscle area, low skeletal muscle area, or combined low skeletal muscle area and -density. Methods: Retrospective database study in mechanically ventilated, adult critically ill patients with an abdominal CT-scan suitable for skeletal muscle assessment around ICU admission, admitted from January 2004 to January 2016 (n = 739). Patients received protocolized nutrition with protein target 1.2–1.5 g/kg/day. Skeletal muscle area and -density were assessed on abdominal CT-scans at the 3rd lumbar vertebra level using previously defined cut-offs. Results: Of 739 included patients (mean age 58 years, 483 male (65%), APACHE II score 23), 294 (40%) were admitted with normal skeletal muscle area and 445 (60%) with low skeletal muscle area. Two hundred (45% of the low skeletal muscle area group) had combined low skeletal muscle area and -density. In the normal skeletal muscle area group, no significant associations were found. In the low skeletal muscle area group, higher early protein intake was associated with lower 60-day mortality (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) per 0.1 g/kg/day 0.82, 95%CI 0.73–0.94) and lower 6-month mortality (HR 0.88, 95%CI 0.79–0.98). Similar associations were found in the combined low skeletal muscle area and -density subgroup (HR 0.76, 95%CI 0.64–0.90 for 60-day mortality and HR 0.80, 95%CI 0.68–0.93 for 6-month mortality). Conclusions: Early high protein intake is associated with lower mortality in critically ill patients with low skeletal muscle area and -density, but not in patients with normal skeletal muscle area on admission. These findings may be a further step to personalized nutrition, although randomized studies are needed to assess causality.
Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Nutrition
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 23 Sep 2019

Cite this

@article{e9083b8d8fab4392a65fc5e0dc159dc2,
title = "Early high protein intake and mortality in critically ill ICU patients with low skeletal muscle area and -density",
abstract = "Background & aims: Optimal nutritional support during the acute phase of critical illness remains controversial. We hypothesized that patients with low skeletal muscle area and -density may specifically benefit from early high protein intake. Aim of the present study was to determine the association between early protein intake (day 2–4) and mortality in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients with normal skeletal muscle area, low skeletal muscle area, or combined low skeletal muscle area and -density. Methods: Retrospective database study in mechanically ventilated, adult critically ill patients with an abdominal CT-scan suitable for skeletal muscle assessment around ICU admission, admitted from January 2004 to January 2016 (n = 739). Patients received protocolized nutrition with protein target 1.2–1.5 g/kg/day. Skeletal muscle area and -density were assessed on abdominal CT-scans at the 3rd lumbar vertebra level using previously defined cut-offs. Results: Of 739 included patients (mean age 58 years, 483 male (65{\%}), APACHE II score 23), 294 (40{\%}) were admitted with normal skeletal muscle area and 445 (60{\%}) with low skeletal muscle area. Two hundred (45{\%} of the low skeletal muscle area group) had combined low skeletal muscle area and -density. In the normal skeletal muscle area group, no significant associations were found. In the low skeletal muscle area group, higher early protein intake was associated with lower 60-day mortality (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) per 0.1 g/kg/day 0.82, 95{\%}CI 0.73–0.94) and lower 6-month mortality (HR 0.88, 95{\%}CI 0.79–0.98). Similar associations were found in the combined low skeletal muscle area and -density subgroup (HR 0.76, 95{\%}CI 0.64–0.90 for 60-day mortality and HR 0.80, 95{\%}CI 0.68–0.93 for 6-month mortality). Conclusions: Early high protein intake is associated with lower mortality in critically ill patients with low skeletal muscle area and -density, but not in patients with normal skeletal muscle area on admission. These findings may be a further step to personalized nutrition, although randomized studies are needed to assess causality.",
keywords = "Computed tomography, Critical care, Intensive care, Protein, Skeletal muscle area, Skeletal muscle density",
author = "Looijaard, {Wilhelmus G. P. M.} and Dekker, {Ingeborg M.} and Albertus Beishuizen and Girbes, {Armand R. J.} and {Oudemans-van Straaten}, {Heleen M.} and Weijs, {Peter J. M.}",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "23",
doi = "10.1016/j.clnu.2019.09.007",
language = "English",
journal = "Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0261-5614",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early high protein intake and mortality in critically ill ICU patients with low skeletal muscle area and -density

AU - Looijaard, Wilhelmus G. P. M.

AU - Dekker, Ingeborg M.

AU - Beishuizen, Albertus

AU - Girbes, Armand R. J.

AU - Oudemans-van Straaten, Heleen M.

AU - Weijs, Peter J. M.

PY - 2019/9/23

Y1 - 2019/9/23

N2 - Background & aims: Optimal nutritional support during the acute phase of critical illness remains controversial. We hypothesized that patients with low skeletal muscle area and -density may specifically benefit from early high protein intake. Aim of the present study was to determine the association between early protein intake (day 2–4) and mortality in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients with normal skeletal muscle area, low skeletal muscle area, or combined low skeletal muscle area and -density. Methods: Retrospective database study in mechanically ventilated, adult critically ill patients with an abdominal CT-scan suitable for skeletal muscle assessment around ICU admission, admitted from January 2004 to January 2016 (n = 739). Patients received protocolized nutrition with protein target 1.2–1.5 g/kg/day. Skeletal muscle area and -density were assessed on abdominal CT-scans at the 3rd lumbar vertebra level using previously defined cut-offs. Results: Of 739 included patients (mean age 58 years, 483 male (65%), APACHE II score 23), 294 (40%) were admitted with normal skeletal muscle area and 445 (60%) with low skeletal muscle area. Two hundred (45% of the low skeletal muscle area group) had combined low skeletal muscle area and -density. In the normal skeletal muscle area group, no significant associations were found. In the low skeletal muscle area group, higher early protein intake was associated with lower 60-day mortality (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) per 0.1 g/kg/day 0.82, 95%CI 0.73–0.94) and lower 6-month mortality (HR 0.88, 95%CI 0.79–0.98). Similar associations were found in the combined low skeletal muscle area and -density subgroup (HR 0.76, 95%CI 0.64–0.90 for 60-day mortality and HR 0.80, 95%CI 0.68–0.93 for 6-month mortality). Conclusions: Early high protein intake is associated with lower mortality in critically ill patients with low skeletal muscle area and -density, but not in patients with normal skeletal muscle area on admission. These findings may be a further step to personalized nutrition, although randomized studies are needed to assess causality.

AB - Background & aims: Optimal nutritional support during the acute phase of critical illness remains controversial. We hypothesized that patients with low skeletal muscle area and -density may specifically benefit from early high protein intake. Aim of the present study was to determine the association between early protein intake (day 2–4) and mortality in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients with normal skeletal muscle area, low skeletal muscle area, or combined low skeletal muscle area and -density. Methods: Retrospective database study in mechanically ventilated, adult critically ill patients with an abdominal CT-scan suitable for skeletal muscle assessment around ICU admission, admitted from January 2004 to January 2016 (n = 739). Patients received protocolized nutrition with protein target 1.2–1.5 g/kg/day. Skeletal muscle area and -density were assessed on abdominal CT-scans at the 3rd lumbar vertebra level using previously defined cut-offs. Results: Of 739 included patients (mean age 58 years, 483 male (65%), APACHE II score 23), 294 (40%) were admitted with normal skeletal muscle area and 445 (60%) with low skeletal muscle area. Two hundred (45% of the low skeletal muscle area group) had combined low skeletal muscle area and -density. In the normal skeletal muscle area group, no significant associations were found. In the low skeletal muscle area group, higher early protein intake was associated with lower 60-day mortality (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) per 0.1 g/kg/day 0.82, 95%CI 0.73–0.94) and lower 6-month mortality (HR 0.88, 95%CI 0.79–0.98). Similar associations were found in the combined low skeletal muscle area and -density subgroup (HR 0.76, 95%CI 0.64–0.90 for 60-day mortality and HR 0.80, 95%CI 0.68–0.93 for 6-month mortality). Conclusions: Early high protein intake is associated with lower mortality in critically ill patients with low skeletal muscle area and -density, but not in patients with normal skeletal muscle area on admission. These findings may be a further step to personalized nutrition, although randomized studies are needed to assess causality.

KW - Computed tomography

KW - Critical care

KW - Intensive care

KW - Protein

KW - Skeletal muscle area

KW - Skeletal muscle density

UR - https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85074432672&origin=inward

UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31669003

U2 - 10.1016/j.clnu.2019.09.007

DO - 10.1016/j.clnu.2019.09.007

M3 - Article

JO - Clinical Nutrition

JF - Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0261-5614

ER -