Estimating Vitamin C Status in Critically Ill Patients with a Novel Point-of-Care Oxidation-Reduction Potential Measurement

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Abstract

Vitamin C deficiency is common in critically ill patients. Vitamin C, the most important antioxidant, is likely consumed during oxidative stress and deficiency is associated with organ dysfunction and mortality. Assessment of vitamin C status may be important to identify patients who might benefit from vitamin C administration. Up to now, vitamin C concentrations are not available in daily clinical practice. Recently, a point-of-care device has been developed that measures the static oxidation-reduction potential (sORP), reflecting oxidative stress, and antioxidant capacity (AOC). The aim of this study was to determine whether plasma vitamin C concentrations were associated with plasma sORP and AOC. Plasma vitamin C concentration, sORP and AOC were measured in three groups: healthy volunteers, critically ill patients, and critically ill patients receiving 2- or 10-g vitamin C infusion. Its association was analyzed using regression models and by assessment of concordance. We measured 211 samples obtained from 103 subjects. Vitamin C concentrations were negatively associated with sORP (R2 = 0.816) and positively associated with AOC (R2 = 0.842). A high concordance of 94-100% was found between vitamin C concentration and sORP/AOC. Thus, plasma vitamin C concentrations are strongly associated with plasma sORP and AOC, as measured with a novel point-of-care device. Therefore, measuring sORP and AOC at the bedside has the potential to identify and monitor patients with oxidative stress and vitamin C deficiency.
Original languageEnglish
JournalNutrients
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Cite this

@article{58553f2f22be464192e7ce49a9bcae1d,
title = "Estimating Vitamin C Status in Critically Ill Patients with a Novel Point-of-Care Oxidation-Reduction Potential Measurement",
abstract = "Vitamin C deficiency is common in critically ill patients. Vitamin C, the most important antioxidant, is likely consumed during oxidative stress and deficiency is associated with organ dysfunction and mortality. Assessment of vitamin C status may be important to identify patients who might benefit from vitamin C administration. Up to now, vitamin C concentrations are not available in daily clinical practice. Recently, a point-of-care device has been developed that measures the static oxidation-reduction potential (sORP), reflecting oxidative stress, and antioxidant capacity (AOC). The aim of this study was to determine whether plasma vitamin C concentrations were associated with plasma sORP and AOC. Plasma vitamin C concentration, sORP and AOC were measured in three groups: healthy volunteers, critically ill patients, and critically ill patients receiving 2- or 10-g vitamin C infusion. Its association was analyzed using regression models and by assessment of concordance. We measured 211 samples obtained from 103 subjects. Vitamin C concentrations were negatively associated with sORP (R2 = 0.816) and positively associated with AOC (R2 = 0.842). A high concordance of 94-100{\%} was found between vitamin C concentration and sORP/AOC. Thus, plasma vitamin C concentrations are strongly associated with plasma sORP and AOC, as measured with a novel point-of-care device. Therefore, measuring sORP and AOC at the bedside has the potential to identify and monitor patients with oxidative stress and vitamin C deficiency.",
keywords = "antioxidant capacity, ascorbate, ascorbic acid, oxidation-reduction potential, oxidative stress, point-of-care device, reactive oxygen species, vitamin C deficiency",
author = "Sander Rozemeijer and {Spoelstra-de Man}, {Ang{\'e}lique M. E.} and Sophie Coenen and Bob Smit and Elbers, {Paul W. G.} and {de Grooth}, Harm-Jan and Girbes, {Armand R. J.} and {Oudemans-van Straaten}, {Heleen M.}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.3390/nu11051031",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "Nutrients",
issn = "2072-6643",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Estimating Vitamin C Status in Critically Ill Patients with a Novel Point-of-Care Oxidation-Reduction Potential Measurement

AU - Rozemeijer, Sander

AU - Spoelstra-de Man, Angélique M. E.

AU - Coenen, Sophie

AU - Smit, Bob

AU - Elbers, Paul W. G.

AU - de Grooth, Harm-Jan

AU - Girbes, Armand R. J.

AU - Oudemans-van Straaten, Heleen M.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Vitamin C deficiency is common in critically ill patients. Vitamin C, the most important antioxidant, is likely consumed during oxidative stress and deficiency is associated with organ dysfunction and mortality. Assessment of vitamin C status may be important to identify patients who might benefit from vitamin C administration. Up to now, vitamin C concentrations are not available in daily clinical practice. Recently, a point-of-care device has been developed that measures the static oxidation-reduction potential (sORP), reflecting oxidative stress, and antioxidant capacity (AOC). The aim of this study was to determine whether plasma vitamin C concentrations were associated with plasma sORP and AOC. Plasma vitamin C concentration, sORP and AOC were measured in three groups: healthy volunteers, critically ill patients, and critically ill patients receiving 2- or 10-g vitamin C infusion. Its association was analyzed using regression models and by assessment of concordance. We measured 211 samples obtained from 103 subjects. Vitamin C concentrations were negatively associated with sORP (R2 = 0.816) and positively associated with AOC (R2 = 0.842). A high concordance of 94-100% was found between vitamin C concentration and sORP/AOC. Thus, plasma vitamin C concentrations are strongly associated with plasma sORP and AOC, as measured with a novel point-of-care device. Therefore, measuring sORP and AOC at the bedside has the potential to identify and monitor patients with oxidative stress and vitamin C deficiency.

AB - Vitamin C deficiency is common in critically ill patients. Vitamin C, the most important antioxidant, is likely consumed during oxidative stress and deficiency is associated with organ dysfunction and mortality. Assessment of vitamin C status may be important to identify patients who might benefit from vitamin C administration. Up to now, vitamin C concentrations are not available in daily clinical practice. Recently, a point-of-care device has been developed that measures the static oxidation-reduction potential (sORP), reflecting oxidative stress, and antioxidant capacity (AOC). The aim of this study was to determine whether plasma vitamin C concentrations were associated with plasma sORP and AOC. Plasma vitamin C concentration, sORP and AOC were measured in three groups: healthy volunteers, critically ill patients, and critically ill patients receiving 2- or 10-g vitamin C infusion. Its association was analyzed using regression models and by assessment of concordance. We measured 211 samples obtained from 103 subjects. Vitamin C concentrations were negatively associated with sORP (R2 = 0.816) and positively associated with AOC (R2 = 0.842). A high concordance of 94-100% was found between vitamin C concentration and sORP/AOC. Thus, plasma vitamin C concentrations are strongly associated with plasma sORP and AOC, as measured with a novel point-of-care device. Therefore, measuring sORP and AOC at the bedside has the potential to identify and monitor patients with oxidative stress and vitamin C deficiency.

KW - antioxidant capacity

KW - ascorbate

KW - ascorbic acid

KW - oxidation-reduction potential

KW - oxidative stress

KW - point-of-care device

KW - reactive oxygen species

KW - vitamin C deficiency

UR - https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85065866056&origin=inward

UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31071996

U2 - 10.3390/nu11051031

DO - 10.3390/nu11051031

M3 - Article

VL - 11

JO - Nutrients

JF - Nutrients

SN - 2072-6643

IS - 5

ER -