Every second retired elite female football player has MRI evidence of knee osteoarthritis before age 50 years: a cross-sectional study of clinical and MRI outcomes

Annika Prien, Sana Boudabous, Astrid Junge, Evert Verhagen, B. nédicte M. A. Delattre, Philippe M. Tscholl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To assess knee health in retired female football players, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and self-report. The focus of analysis were degenerative changes of the tibiofemoral joint, and their relationship to osteoarthritis symptoms and previous knee injury. Methods: Forty-nine retired elite, female football players (98 knees) aged 37 years on average participated. Tibiofemoral cartilage and meniscus status of both knees were evaluated using MRI and graded according to modified Outerbridge and Stoller classifications, respectively. Symptoms were assessed through a standardised questionnaire (Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score: KOOS). Knee injury history was recorded via a semi-structured interview. To investigate how injury variables relate to outcomes, binary logistic regression models were used and reported with odds ratios (OR). Results: Fifty-one per cent of players (n = 25) fulfilled the MRI criterion for knee osteoarthritis, 69.4% (n = 34) had substantial meniscal loss and 59.6% (n = 28) reported substantial clinical symptoms. Chondral- and meniscal loss were associated with significantly lower scores on three of five KOOS subscales (p <.05). Both chondral and meniscal loss were significantly predicted by previous traumatic knee injury (OR = 4.6, OR = 2.6), the injury affecting the non-striking leg (OR = 8.6, OR = 10.6) and type of injury; participants with combined ACL/meniscus injuries had the highest risk for substantial chondral and meniscal loss (OR = 14.8, OR = 9.5). Chondral loss was significantly predicted by isolated meniscus injury treated with partial meniscectomy (OR = 5.4), but not by isolated reconstructed ACL injury. Clinical symptoms were only significantly predicted by previous traumatic knee injury (OR = 5.1). Conclusions: Serious degenerative changes were found in a high number of retired female football players’ knees 10 years after their career. Meniscal integrity is key for knee osteoarthritis outcomes in young adults, and thus, its preservation should be a priority.
Original languageEnglish
JournalKnee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy
Early online date17 Jun 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Cite this

@article{54cebebe2f5c413b944088ba9cdedc5a,
title = "Every second retired elite female football player has MRI evidence of knee osteoarthritis before age 50 years: a cross-sectional study of clinical and MRI outcomes",
abstract = "Purpose: To assess knee health in retired female football players, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and self-report. The focus of analysis were degenerative changes of the tibiofemoral joint, and their relationship to osteoarthritis symptoms and previous knee injury. Methods: Forty-nine retired elite, female football players (98 knees) aged 37 years on average participated. Tibiofemoral cartilage and meniscus status of both knees were evaluated using MRI and graded according to modified Outerbridge and Stoller classifications, respectively. Symptoms were assessed through a standardised questionnaire (Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score: KOOS). Knee injury history was recorded via a semi-structured interview. To investigate how injury variables relate to outcomes, binary logistic regression models were used and reported with odds ratios (OR). Results: Fifty-one per cent of players (n = 25) fulfilled the MRI criterion for knee osteoarthritis, 69.4{\%} (n = 34) had substantial meniscal loss and 59.6{\%} (n = 28) reported substantial clinical symptoms. Chondral- and meniscal loss were associated with significantly lower scores on three of five KOOS subscales (p <.05). Both chondral and meniscal loss were significantly predicted by previous traumatic knee injury (OR = 4.6, OR = 2.6), the injury affecting the non-striking leg (OR = 8.6, OR = 10.6) and type of injury; participants with combined ACL/meniscus injuries had the highest risk for substantial chondral and meniscal loss (OR = 14.8, OR = 9.5). Chondral loss was significantly predicted by isolated meniscus injury treated with partial meniscectomy (OR = 5.4), but not by isolated reconstructed ACL injury. Clinical symptoms were only significantly predicted by previous traumatic knee injury (OR = 5.1). Conclusions: Serious degenerative changes were found in a high number of retired female football players’ knees 10 years after their career. Meniscal integrity is key for knee osteoarthritis outcomes in young adults, and thus, its preservation should be a priority.",
author = "Annika Prien and Sana Boudabous and Astrid Junge and Evert Verhagen and Delattre, {B. n{\'e}dicte M. A.} and Tscholl, {Philippe M.}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1007/s00167-019-05560-w",
language = "English",
journal = "Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy",
issn = "0942-2056",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",

}

Every second retired elite female football player has MRI evidence of knee osteoarthritis before age 50 years : a cross-sectional study of clinical and MRI outcomes. / Prien, Annika; Boudabous, Sana; Junge, Astrid; Verhagen, Evert; Delattre, B. nédicte M. A.; Tscholl, Philippe M.

In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Every second retired elite female football player has MRI evidence of knee osteoarthritis before age 50 years

T2 - a cross-sectional study of clinical and MRI outcomes

AU - Prien, Annika

AU - Boudabous, Sana

AU - Junge, Astrid

AU - Verhagen, Evert

AU - Delattre, B. nédicte M. A.

AU - Tscholl, Philippe M.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Purpose: To assess knee health in retired female football players, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and self-report. The focus of analysis were degenerative changes of the tibiofemoral joint, and their relationship to osteoarthritis symptoms and previous knee injury. Methods: Forty-nine retired elite, female football players (98 knees) aged 37 years on average participated. Tibiofemoral cartilage and meniscus status of both knees were evaluated using MRI and graded according to modified Outerbridge and Stoller classifications, respectively. Symptoms were assessed through a standardised questionnaire (Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score: KOOS). Knee injury history was recorded via a semi-structured interview. To investigate how injury variables relate to outcomes, binary logistic regression models were used and reported with odds ratios (OR). Results: Fifty-one per cent of players (n = 25) fulfilled the MRI criterion for knee osteoarthritis, 69.4% (n = 34) had substantial meniscal loss and 59.6% (n = 28) reported substantial clinical symptoms. Chondral- and meniscal loss were associated with significantly lower scores on three of five KOOS subscales (p <.05). Both chondral and meniscal loss were significantly predicted by previous traumatic knee injury (OR = 4.6, OR = 2.6), the injury affecting the non-striking leg (OR = 8.6, OR = 10.6) and type of injury; participants with combined ACL/meniscus injuries had the highest risk for substantial chondral and meniscal loss (OR = 14.8, OR = 9.5). Chondral loss was significantly predicted by isolated meniscus injury treated with partial meniscectomy (OR = 5.4), but not by isolated reconstructed ACL injury. Clinical symptoms were only significantly predicted by previous traumatic knee injury (OR = 5.1). Conclusions: Serious degenerative changes were found in a high number of retired female football players’ knees 10 years after their career. Meniscal integrity is key for knee osteoarthritis outcomes in young adults, and thus, its preservation should be a priority.

AB - Purpose: To assess knee health in retired female football players, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and self-report. The focus of analysis were degenerative changes of the tibiofemoral joint, and their relationship to osteoarthritis symptoms and previous knee injury. Methods: Forty-nine retired elite, female football players (98 knees) aged 37 years on average participated. Tibiofemoral cartilage and meniscus status of both knees were evaluated using MRI and graded according to modified Outerbridge and Stoller classifications, respectively. Symptoms were assessed through a standardised questionnaire (Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score: KOOS). Knee injury history was recorded via a semi-structured interview. To investigate how injury variables relate to outcomes, binary logistic regression models were used and reported with odds ratios (OR). Results: Fifty-one per cent of players (n = 25) fulfilled the MRI criterion for knee osteoarthritis, 69.4% (n = 34) had substantial meniscal loss and 59.6% (n = 28) reported substantial clinical symptoms. Chondral- and meniscal loss were associated with significantly lower scores on three of five KOOS subscales (p <.05). Both chondral and meniscal loss were significantly predicted by previous traumatic knee injury (OR = 4.6, OR = 2.6), the injury affecting the non-striking leg (OR = 8.6, OR = 10.6) and type of injury; participants with combined ACL/meniscus injuries had the highest risk for substantial chondral and meniscal loss (OR = 14.8, OR = 9.5). Chondral loss was significantly predicted by isolated meniscus injury treated with partial meniscectomy (OR = 5.4), but not by isolated reconstructed ACL injury. Clinical symptoms were only significantly predicted by previous traumatic knee injury (OR = 5.1). Conclusions: Serious degenerative changes were found in a high number of retired female football players’ knees 10 years after their career. Meniscal integrity is key for knee osteoarthritis outcomes in young adults, and thus, its preservation should be a priority.

UR - https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85067645205&origin=inward

U2 - 10.1007/s00167-019-05560-w

DO - 10.1007/s00167-019-05560-w

M3 - Article

JO - Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy

JF - Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy

SN - 0942-2056

ER -