Factors Associated With Nonadherence to Cardiovascular Medications: A Cross-sectional Study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background Cardiovascular medications have well-established benefits in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Unfortunately, adherence to these medicines is often suboptimal. To develop interventions intended to enhance adherence to cardiovascular medications, more insight is needed into the complex character of medication nonadherence. Objective The aim of the present study was to identify which factors are associated with nonadherence to cardiovascular medications in a sample of patients from Dutch community pharmacies. Methods In this cross-sectional study, patients using cardiovascular medications from 23 community pharmacies were included. Patient demographics, medication and disease characteristics, knowledge, quality of life, attitude toward medicines, and satisfaction with information were assessed. Both an adherent sample (n = 146) and a sample of patients nonadherent to prescribed medications (n = 109) during the last 6 months as assessed with pharmacy refill data (proportion of days covered <80%) were selected. Associations with refill nonadherence were assessed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results In total, 255 patients participated (53.3% men, 71.6 ± 10.9 years). Factors associated with cardiovascular medication nonadherence in multivariate analyses included experiencing difficulties with medication use due to forgetting, having insufficient knowledge on what to do when a dose is forgotten, and having an ambivalent attitude toward medicines (beliefs of high necessity and high concerns). Conclusions Intervention strategies to enhance cardiovascular medication nonadherence should be targeted mainly to the unintentional dimension of nonadherence and include information and tools to prevent forgetting. Conversely, the influence of factors that underlie intentional nonadherence, particularly patients' beliefs about medicines, should also be addressed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)344-352
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of cardiovascular nursing
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Cite this

@article{d71a7955bc38441485b0748f07788392,
title = "Factors Associated With Nonadherence to Cardiovascular Medications: A Cross-sectional Study",
abstract = "Background Cardiovascular medications have well-established benefits in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Unfortunately, adherence to these medicines is often suboptimal. To develop interventions intended to enhance adherence to cardiovascular medications, more insight is needed into the complex character of medication nonadherence. Objective The aim of the present study was to identify which factors are associated with nonadherence to cardiovascular medications in a sample of patients from Dutch community pharmacies. Methods In this cross-sectional study, patients using cardiovascular medications from 23 community pharmacies were included. Patient demographics, medication and disease characteristics, knowledge, quality of life, attitude toward medicines, and satisfaction with information were assessed. Both an adherent sample (n = 146) and a sample of patients nonadherent to prescribed medications (n = 109) during the last 6 months as assessed with pharmacy refill data (proportion of days covered <80{\%}) were selected. Associations with refill nonadherence were assessed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results In total, 255 patients participated (53.3{\%} men, 71.6 ± 10.9 years). Factors associated with cardiovascular medication nonadherence in multivariate analyses included experiencing difficulties with medication use due to forgetting, having insufficient knowledge on what to do when a dose is forgotten, and having an ambivalent attitude toward medicines (beliefs of high necessity and high concerns). Conclusions Intervention strategies to enhance cardiovascular medication nonadherence should be targeted mainly to the unintentional dimension of nonadherence and include information and tools to prevent forgetting. Conversely, the influence of factors that underlie intentional nonadherence, particularly patients' beliefs about medicines, should also be addressed.",
author = "{van der Laan}, {Danielle M.} and Elders, {Petra J. M.} and Boons, {Christel C. L. M.} and Giel Nijpels and Hugtenburg, {Jacqueline G.}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1097/JCN.0000000000000582",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "344--352",
journal = "Journal of cardiovascular nursing",
issn = "0889-4655",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

Factors Associated With Nonadherence to Cardiovascular Medications : A Cross-sectional Study. / van der Laan, Danielle M.; Elders, Petra J. M.; Boons, Christel C. L. M.; Nijpels, Giel; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G.

In: Journal of cardiovascular nursing, Vol. 34, No. 4, 2019, p. 344-352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors Associated With Nonadherence to Cardiovascular Medications

T2 - A Cross-sectional Study

AU - van der Laan, Danielle M.

AU - Elders, Petra J. M.

AU - Boons, Christel C. L. M.

AU - Nijpels, Giel

AU - Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Background Cardiovascular medications have well-established benefits in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Unfortunately, adherence to these medicines is often suboptimal. To develop interventions intended to enhance adherence to cardiovascular medications, more insight is needed into the complex character of medication nonadherence. Objective The aim of the present study was to identify which factors are associated with nonadherence to cardiovascular medications in a sample of patients from Dutch community pharmacies. Methods In this cross-sectional study, patients using cardiovascular medications from 23 community pharmacies were included. Patient demographics, medication and disease characteristics, knowledge, quality of life, attitude toward medicines, and satisfaction with information were assessed. Both an adherent sample (n = 146) and a sample of patients nonadherent to prescribed medications (n = 109) during the last 6 months as assessed with pharmacy refill data (proportion of days covered <80%) were selected. Associations with refill nonadherence were assessed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results In total, 255 patients participated (53.3% men, 71.6 ± 10.9 years). Factors associated with cardiovascular medication nonadherence in multivariate analyses included experiencing difficulties with medication use due to forgetting, having insufficient knowledge on what to do when a dose is forgotten, and having an ambivalent attitude toward medicines (beliefs of high necessity and high concerns). Conclusions Intervention strategies to enhance cardiovascular medication nonadherence should be targeted mainly to the unintentional dimension of nonadherence and include information and tools to prevent forgetting. Conversely, the influence of factors that underlie intentional nonadherence, particularly patients' beliefs about medicines, should also be addressed.

AB - Background Cardiovascular medications have well-established benefits in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Unfortunately, adherence to these medicines is often suboptimal. To develop interventions intended to enhance adherence to cardiovascular medications, more insight is needed into the complex character of medication nonadherence. Objective The aim of the present study was to identify which factors are associated with nonadherence to cardiovascular medications in a sample of patients from Dutch community pharmacies. Methods In this cross-sectional study, patients using cardiovascular medications from 23 community pharmacies were included. Patient demographics, medication and disease characteristics, knowledge, quality of life, attitude toward medicines, and satisfaction with information were assessed. Both an adherent sample (n = 146) and a sample of patients nonadherent to prescribed medications (n = 109) during the last 6 months as assessed with pharmacy refill data (proportion of days covered <80%) were selected. Associations with refill nonadherence were assessed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results In total, 255 patients participated (53.3% men, 71.6 ± 10.9 years). Factors associated with cardiovascular medication nonadherence in multivariate analyses included experiencing difficulties with medication use due to forgetting, having insufficient knowledge on what to do when a dose is forgotten, and having an ambivalent attitude toward medicines (beliefs of high necessity and high concerns). Conclusions Intervention strategies to enhance cardiovascular medication nonadherence should be targeted mainly to the unintentional dimension of nonadherence and include information and tools to prevent forgetting. Conversely, the influence of factors that underlie intentional nonadherence, particularly patients' beliefs about medicines, should also be addressed.

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DO - 10.1097/JCN.0000000000000582

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 344

EP - 352

JO - Journal of cardiovascular nursing

JF - Journal of cardiovascular nursing

SN - 0889-4655

IS - 4

ER -