Feasibility of using head and neck CT imaging to assess skeletal muscle mass in head and neck cancer patients

Justin E Swartz, Ajit J Pothen, Inge Wegner, Ernst J Smid, Karin M A Swart, Remco de Bree, Loek P H Leenen, Wilko Grolman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) have a higher risk of malnutrition and sarcopenia, which is associated with adverse clinical outcome. As abdominal CT-imaging is often used to detect sarcopenia, such scans are rarely available in HNC patients, possibly explaining why no studies investigate the effect of sarcopenia in this population. We correlated skeletal muscle mass assessed on head and neck CT-scans with abdominal CT-imaging.

METHODS: Head and neck, and abdominal CT-scans of trauma (n=51) and HNC-patients (n=52) were retrospectively analyzed. On the head and neck CT-scans, the paravertebral and sternocleidomastoid muscles were delineated. On the abdominal CT-scans, all muscles were delineated. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the muscles at the level of the C3 vertebra was compared to CSA at the L3 level using linear regression. A multivariate linear regression model was established.

RESULTS: HNC-patients had significantly lower muscle CSA than trauma patients (37.9 vs. 45.1cm2, p<0.001, corrected for sex and age). C3 muscle CSA strongly predicted L3 muscle CSA (r=0.785, p<0.001). This correlation was stronger in a multivariate model including sex, age and weight (r=0.891, p<0.001).

DISCUSSION: Assessment of skeletal muscle mass on head and neck CT-scans is feasible and may be an alternative to abdominal CT-imaging. This method allows assessment of sarcopenia using routinely performed scans without additional imaging or additional patient burden. Identifying sarcopenic patients may help in treatment selection, or to select HNC patients for physiotherapeutic or nutritional interventions to improve their outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)28-33
Number of pages6
JournalOral Oncology
Volume62
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2016
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Swartz, Justin E ; Pothen, Ajit J ; Wegner, Inge ; Smid, Ernst J ; Swart, Karin M A ; de Bree, Remco ; Leenen, Loek P H ; Grolman, Wilko. / Feasibility of using head and neck CT imaging to assess skeletal muscle mass in head and neck cancer patients. In: Oral Oncology. 2016 ; Vol. 62. pp. 28-33.
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title = "Feasibility of using head and neck CT imaging to assess skeletal muscle mass in head and neck cancer patients",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) have a higher risk of malnutrition and sarcopenia, which is associated with adverse clinical outcome. As abdominal CT-imaging is often used to detect sarcopenia, such scans are rarely available in HNC patients, possibly explaining why no studies investigate the effect of sarcopenia in this population. We correlated skeletal muscle mass assessed on head and neck CT-scans with abdominal CT-imaging.METHODS: Head and neck, and abdominal CT-scans of trauma (n=51) and HNC-patients (n=52) were retrospectively analyzed. On the head and neck CT-scans, the paravertebral and sternocleidomastoid muscles were delineated. On the abdominal CT-scans, all muscles were delineated. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the muscles at the level of the C3 vertebra was compared to CSA at the L3 level using linear regression. A multivariate linear regression model was established.RESULTS: HNC-patients had significantly lower muscle CSA than trauma patients (37.9 vs. 45.1cm2, p<0.001, corrected for sex and age). C3 muscle CSA strongly predicted L3 muscle CSA (r=0.785, p<0.001). This correlation was stronger in a multivariate model including sex, age and weight (r=0.891, p<0.001).DISCUSSION: Assessment of skeletal muscle mass on head and neck CT-scans is feasible and may be an alternative to abdominal CT-imaging. This method allows assessment of sarcopenia using routinely performed scans without additional imaging or additional patient burden. Identifying sarcopenic patients may help in treatment selection, or to select HNC patients for physiotherapeutic or nutritional interventions to improve their outcome.",
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author = "Swartz, {Justin E} and Pothen, {Ajit J} and Inge Wegner and Smid, {Ernst J} and Swart, {Karin M A} and {de Bree}, Remco and Leenen, {Loek P H} and Wilko Grolman",
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Feasibility of using head and neck CT imaging to assess skeletal muscle mass in head and neck cancer patients. / Swartz, Justin E; Pothen, Ajit J; Wegner, Inge; Smid, Ernst J; Swart, Karin M A; de Bree, Remco; Leenen, Loek P H; Grolman, Wilko.

In: Oral Oncology, Vol. 62, 11.2016, p. 28-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Feasibility of using head and neck CT imaging to assess skeletal muscle mass in head and neck cancer patients

AU - Swartz, Justin E

AU - Pothen, Ajit J

AU - Wegner, Inge

AU - Smid, Ernst J

AU - Swart, Karin M A

AU - de Bree, Remco

AU - Leenen, Loek P H

AU - Grolman, Wilko

N1 - Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2016/11

Y1 - 2016/11

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) have a higher risk of malnutrition and sarcopenia, which is associated with adverse clinical outcome. As abdominal CT-imaging is often used to detect sarcopenia, such scans are rarely available in HNC patients, possibly explaining why no studies investigate the effect of sarcopenia in this population. We correlated skeletal muscle mass assessed on head and neck CT-scans with abdominal CT-imaging.METHODS: Head and neck, and abdominal CT-scans of trauma (n=51) and HNC-patients (n=52) were retrospectively analyzed. On the head and neck CT-scans, the paravertebral and sternocleidomastoid muscles were delineated. On the abdominal CT-scans, all muscles were delineated. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the muscles at the level of the C3 vertebra was compared to CSA at the L3 level using linear regression. A multivariate linear regression model was established.RESULTS: HNC-patients had significantly lower muscle CSA than trauma patients (37.9 vs. 45.1cm2, p<0.001, corrected for sex and age). C3 muscle CSA strongly predicted L3 muscle CSA (r=0.785, p<0.001). This correlation was stronger in a multivariate model including sex, age and weight (r=0.891, p<0.001).DISCUSSION: Assessment of skeletal muscle mass on head and neck CT-scans is feasible and may be an alternative to abdominal CT-imaging. This method allows assessment of sarcopenia using routinely performed scans without additional imaging or additional patient burden. Identifying sarcopenic patients may help in treatment selection, or to select HNC patients for physiotherapeutic or nutritional interventions to improve their outcome.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) have a higher risk of malnutrition and sarcopenia, which is associated with adverse clinical outcome. As abdominal CT-imaging is often used to detect sarcopenia, such scans are rarely available in HNC patients, possibly explaining why no studies investigate the effect of sarcopenia in this population. We correlated skeletal muscle mass assessed on head and neck CT-scans with abdominal CT-imaging.METHODS: Head and neck, and abdominal CT-scans of trauma (n=51) and HNC-patients (n=52) were retrospectively analyzed. On the head and neck CT-scans, the paravertebral and sternocleidomastoid muscles were delineated. On the abdominal CT-scans, all muscles were delineated. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the muscles at the level of the C3 vertebra was compared to CSA at the L3 level using linear regression. A multivariate linear regression model was established.RESULTS: HNC-patients had significantly lower muscle CSA than trauma patients (37.9 vs. 45.1cm2, p<0.001, corrected for sex and age). C3 muscle CSA strongly predicted L3 muscle CSA (r=0.785, p<0.001). This correlation was stronger in a multivariate model including sex, age and weight (r=0.891, p<0.001).DISCUSSION: Assessment of skeletal muscle mass on head and neck CT-scans is feasible and may be an alternative to abdominal CT-imaging. This method allows assessment of sarcopenia using routinely performed scans without additional imaging or additional patient burden. Identifying sarcopenic patients may help in treatment selection, or to select HNC patients for physiotherapeutic or nutritional interventions to improve their outcome.

KW - Aged

KW - Feasibility Studies

KW - Female

KW - Head and Neck Neoplasms/complications

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Muscle, Skeletal/diagnostic imaging

KW - Organ Size

KW - Retrospective Studies

KW - Sarcopenia/complications

KW - Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods

U2 - 10.1016/j.oraloncology.2016.09.006

DO - 10.1016/j.oraloncology.2016.09.006

M3 - Article

VL - 62

SP - 28

EP - 33

JO - Oral Oncology

JF - Oral Oncology

SN - 1368-8375

ER -