Growth pattern and final height of very preterm vs. very low birth weight infants

Jonneke J. Hollanders, Sylvia M. Van Der Pal, Paula Van Dommelen, Joost Rotteveel, Martijn J.J. Finken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BackgroundBoth very preterm (VP; i.e., gestational age <32 weeks) and very low birth weight (VLBW; i.e., birth weight <1,500 g) are used as inclusion criteria by studies on preterm birth. We aimed to quantify the impact of these entities on postnatal growth until final height.MethodsSubjects born VP and/or with VLBW from the Project On Preterm and Small-for-gestational-age infants cohort were classified as follows: (1) VP+/VLBW+ (n=495), (2) VP+/VLBW- (n=207), or (3) VP-/VLBW+ (n=296) infants. Anthropometric data were collected at birth, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months' corrected age, and at 5 and 19 years. At 19 years, 590/998 (59%) of the subjects enrolled in 1983 were followed up.ResultsBirth size was smallest in the VP-/VLBW+ group compared with the VP+/VLBW+ and VP+/VLBW- groups. During childhood, length, weight, and head circumference SD scores increased in the VP-/VLBW+ group, whereas SD scores in the VP+/VLBW+ and VP+/VLBW- groups either remained stable or decreased. Despite catch-up growth, VP-/VLBW+ infants remained the shortest and lightest at age 19.ConclusionClassification on the basis of VP and VLBW impacts growth, causing different growth patterns for infants born VP+/VLBW+, VP+/VLBW-, or VP-/VLBW+. For future studies, we recommend, at least for industrialized countries, including preterm infants based on gestational age.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)317-323
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Research
Volume82
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2017

Cite this

@article{530752256d6244b9b8bcc666e9d036aa,
title = "Growth pattern and final height of very preterm vs. very low birth weight infants",
abstract = "BackgroundBoth very preterm (VP; i.e., gestational age <32 weeks) and very low birth weight (VLBW; i.e., birth weight <1,500 g) are used as inclusion criteria by studies on preterm birth. We aimed to quantify the impact of these entities on postnatal growth until final height.MethodsSubjects born VP and/or with VLBW from the Project On Preterm and Small-for-gestational-age infants cohort were classified as follows: (1) VP+/VLBW+ (n=495), (2) VP+/VLBW- (n=207), or (3) VP-/VLBW+ (n=296) infants. Anthropometric data were collected at birth, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months' corrected age, and at 5 and 19 years. At 19 years, 590/998 (59{\%}) of the subjects enrolled in 1983 were followed up.ResultsBirth size was smallest in the VP-/VLBW+ group compared with the VP+/VLBW+ and VP+/VLBW- groups. During childhood, length, weight, and head circumference SD scores increased in the VP-/VLBW+ group, whereas SD scores in the VP+/VLBW+ and VP+/VLBW- groups either remained stable or decreased. Despite catch-up growth, VP-/VLBW+ infants remained the shortest and lightest at age 19.ConclusionClassification on the basis of VP and VLBW impacts growth, causing different growth patterns for infants born VP+/VLBW+, VP+/VLBW-, or VP-/VLBW+. For future studies, we recommend, at least for industrialized countries, including preterm infants based on gestational age.",
author = "Hollanders, {Jonneke J.} and {Van Der Pal}, {Sylvia M.} and {Van Dommelen}, Paula and Joost Rotteveel and Finken, {Martijn J.J.}",
year = "2017",
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day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/pr.2017.63",
language = "English",
volume = "82",
pages = "317--323",
journal = "Pediatric Research",
issn = "0031-3998",
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Growth pattern and final height of very preterm vs. very low birth weight infants. / Hollanders, Jonneke J.; Van Der Pal, Sylvia M.; Van Dommelen, Paula; Rotteveel, Joost; Finken, Martijn J.J.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 82, No. 2, 01.08.2017, p. 317-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Growth pattern and final height of very preterm vs. very low birth weight infants

AU - Hollanders, Jonneke J.

AU - Van Der Pal, Sylvia M.

AU - Van Dommelen, Paula

AU - Rotteveel, Joost

AU - Finken, Martijn J.J.

PY - 2017/8/1

Y1 - 2017/8/1

N2 - BackgroundBoth very preterm (VP; i.e., gestational age <32 weeks) and very low birth weight (VLBW; i.e., birth weight <1,500 g) are used as inclusion criteria by studies on preterm birth. We aimed to quantify the impact of these entities on postnatal growth until final height.MethodsSubjects born VP and/or with VLBW from the Project On Preterm and Small-for-gestational-age infants cohort were classified as follows: (1) VP+/VLBW+ (n=495), (2) VP+/VLBW- (n=207), or (3) VP-/VLBW+ (n=296) infants. Anthropometric data were collected at birth, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months' corrected age, and at 5 and 19 years. At 19 years, 590/998 (59%) of the subjects enrolled in 1983 were followed up.ResultsBirth size was smallest in the VP-/VLBW+ group compared with the VP+/VLBW+ and VP+/VLBW- groups. During childhood, length, weight, and head circumference SD scores increased in the VP-/VLBW+ group, whereas SD scores in the VP+/VLBW+ and VP+/VLBW- groups either remained stable or decreased. Despite catch-up growth, VP-/VLBW+ infants remained the shortest and lightest at age 19.ConclusionClassification on the basis of VP and VLBW impacts growth, causing different growth patterns for infants born VP+/VLBW+, VP+/VLBW-, or VP-/VLBW+. For future studies, we recommend, at least for industrialized countries, including preterm infants based on gestational age.

AB - BackgroundBoth very preterm (VP; i.e., gestational age <32 weeks) and very low birth weight (VLBW; i.e., birth weight <1,500 g) are used as inclusion criteria by studies on preterm birth. We aimed to quantify the impact of these entities on postnatal growth until final height.MethodsSubjects born VP and/or with VLBW from the Project On Preterm and Small-for-gestational-age infants cohort were classified as follows: (1) VP+/VLBW+ (n=495), (2) VP+/VLBW- (n=207), or (3) VP-/VLBW+ (n=296) infants. Anthropometric data were collected at birth, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months' corrected age, and at 5 and 19 years. At 19 years, 590/998 (59%) of the subjects enrolled in 1983 were followed up.ResultsBirth size was smallest in the VP-/VLBW+ group compared with the VP+/VLBW+ and VP+/VLBW- groups. During childhood, length, weight, and head circumference SD scores increased in the VP-/VLBW+ group, whereas SD scores in the VP+/VLBW+ and VP+/VLBW- groups either remained stable or decreased. Despite catch-up growth, VP-/VLBW+ infants remained the shortest and lightest at age 19.ConclusionClassification on the basis of VP and VLBW impacts growth, causing different growth patterns for infants born VP+/VLBW+, VP+/VLBW-, or VP-/VLBW+. For future studies, we recommend, at least for industrialized countries, including preterm infants based on gestational age.

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U2 - 10.1038/pr.2017.63

DO - 10.1038/pr.2017.63

M3 - Article

VL - 82

SP - 317

EP - 323

JO - Pediatric Research

JF - Pediatric Research

SN - 0031-3998

IS - 2

ER -