Health differences between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment in the Netherlands: A cross-sectional study among Dutch workers

Stef Bouwhuis, Goedele A. Geuskens, C. cile R. L. Boot, Allard J. van der Beek, Paulien M. Bongers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction Precarious employment is associated with poor health. Among employees in precarious employment, those with multiple jobs may face additional health risks, e.g. due to combining work schedules and job roles. Our research question is: do differences in health exist between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment? Methods Participants in the Netherlands Working Conditions Survey 2012 aged 25-64 years who were not employed through the Act on Social Work Provision and who had a precarious job were included. To select employees in precarious employment (n = 3,609), latent class analysis was performed, based on variables based on indicators described by Van Aerden. Differences in general self-perceived health, burnout complaints, musculoskeletal health, and sickness absence between multiple and single job holders were studied cross-sectionally using logistic regression analyses. Results No significant differences were found between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment for self-perceived health (OR = 0.9; 95%CI = 0.7-1.3), burnout complaints (OR = 0.9; 95%CI = 0.7-1.2), and musculoskeletal health (OR = 1.1; 95%CI = 0.8-1.5). In crude analyses, multiple job holders experienced less sickness absence than single job holders (OR = 0.7; 95%CI = 0.5-0.9). In adjusted analyses, this difference was no longer statistically significant (OR = 0.8; 95%CI = 0.6-1.0). Conclusions Despite potential health risks related to multiple job holding, we did not find health differences between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment in the Netherlands. More longitudinal research is necessary to provide recommendations for policy makers regarding multiple job holders in precarious employment.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0222217
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume14
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Cite this

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title = "Health differences between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment in the Netherlands: A cross-sectional study among Dutch workers",
abstract = "Introduction Precarious employment is associated with poor health. Among employees in precarious employment, those with multiple jobs may face additional health risks, e.g. due to combining work schedules and job roles. Our research question is: do differences in health exist between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment? Methods Participants in the Netherlands Working Conditions Survey 2012 aged 25-64 years who were not employed through the Act on Social Work Provision and who had a precarious job were included. To select employees in precarious employment (n = 3,609), latent class analysis was performed, based on variables based on indicators described by Van Aerden. Differences in general self-perceived health, burnout complaints, musculoskeletal health, and sickness absence between multiple and single job holders were studied cross-sectionally using logistic regression analyses. Results No significant differences were found between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment for self-perceived health (OR = 0.9; 95{\%}CI = 0.7-1.3), burnout complaints (OR = 0.9; 95{\%}CI = 0.7-1.2), and musculoskeletal health (OR = 1.1; 95{\%}CI = 0.8-1.5). In crude analyses, multiple job holders experienced less sickness absence than single job holders (OR = 0.7; 95{\%}CI = 0.5-0.9). In adjusted analyses, this difference was no longer statistically significant (OR = 0.8; 95{\%}CI = 0.6-1.0). Conclusions Despite potential health risks related to multiple job holding, we did not find health differences between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment in the Netherlands. More longitudinal research is necessary to provide recommendations for policy makers regarding multiple job holders in precarious employment.",
author = "Stef Bouwhuis and Geuskens, {Goedele A.} and Boot, {C. cile R. L.} and {van der Beek}, {Allard J.} and Bongers, {Paulien M.}",
year = "2019",
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Health differences between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment in the Netherlands: A cross-sectional study among Dutch workers. / Bouwhuis, Stef; Geuskens, Goedele A.; Boot, C. cile R. L.; van der Beek, Allard J.; Bongers, Paulien M.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 14, No. 9, e0222217, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Health differences between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment in the Netherlands: A cross-sectional study among Dutch workers

AU - Bouwhuis, Stef

AU - Geuskens, Goedele A.

AU - Boot, C. cile R. L.

AU - van der Beek, Allard J.

AU - Bongers, Paulien M.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Introduction Precarious employment is associated with poor health. Among employees in precarious employment, those with multiple jobs may face additional health risks, e.g. due to combining work schedules and job roles. Our research question is: do differences in health exist between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment? Methods Participants in the Netherlands Working Conditions Survey 2012 aged 25-64 years who were not employed through the Act on Social Work Provision and who had a precarious job were included. To select employees in precarious employment (n = 3,609), latent class analysis was performed, based on variables based on indicators described by Van Aerden. Differences in general self-perceived health, burnout complaints, musculoskeletal health, and sickness absence between multiple and single job holders were studied cross-sectionally using logistic regression analyses. Results No significant differences were found between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment for self-perceived health (OR = 0.9; 95%CI = 0.7-1.3), burnout complaints (OR = 0.9; 95%CI = 0.7-1.2), and musculoskeletal health (OR = 1.1; 95%CI = 0.8-1.5). In crude analyses, multiple job holders experienced less sickness absence than single job holders (OR = 0.7; 95%CI = 0.5-0.9). In adjusted analyses, this difference was no longer statistically significant (OR = 0.8; 95%CI = 0.6-1.0). Conclusions Despite potential health risks related to multiple job holding, we did not find health differences between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment in the Netherlands. More longitudinal research is necessary to provide recommendations for policy makers regarding multiple job holders in precarious employment.

AB - Introduction Precarious employment is associated with poor health. Among employees in precarious employment, those with multiple jobs may face additional health risks, e.g. due to combining work schedules and job roles. Our research question is: do differences in health exist between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment? Methods Participants in the Netherlands Working Conditions Survey 2012 aged 25-64 years who were not employed through the Act on Social Work Provision and who had a precarious job were included. To select employees in precarious employment (n = 3,609), latent class analysis was performed, based on variables based on indicators described by Van Aerden. Differences in general self-perceived health, burnout complaints, musculoskeletal health, and sickness absence between multiple and single job holders were studied cross-sectionally using logistic regression analyses. Results No significant differences were found between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment for self-perceived health (OR = 0.9; 95%CI = 0.7-1.3), burnout complaints (OR = 0.9; 95%CI = 0.7-1.2), and musculoskeletal health (OR = 1.1; 95%CI = 0.8-1.5). In crude analyses, multiple job holders experienced less sickness absence than single job holders (OR = 0.7; 95%CI = 0.5-0.9). In adjusted analyses, this difference was no longer statistically significant (OR = 0.8; 95%CI = 0.6-1.0). Conclusions Despite potential health risks related to multiple job holding, we did not find health differences between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment in the Netherlands. More longitudinal research is necessary to provide recommendations for policy makers regarding multiple job holders in precarious employment.

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UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31509574

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0222217

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0222217

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JF - PLoS ONE

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