Home-care nursing staff in self-directed teams are more satisfied with their job and feel they have more autonomy over patient care: a nationwide survey

Erica E.M. Maurits, Anke J.E. de Veer, Peter P. Groenewegen, Anneke L. Francke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Aims: The aims of this study were: (1) To examine whether working in a self-directed team is related to home-care nursing staff's job satisfaction; (2) To assess the mediating effect of self-perceived autonomy over patient care; (3) To investigate the moderating effect of educational level on the association between autonomy over patient care and job satisfaction. Background: Self-directed teams are being introduced in home care in several countries. It is unknown whether working in a self-directed team is related to nursing staff's job satisfaction. It is important to gain insight into this association since self-directed teams may help in retaining nursing staff. Design: A cross-sectional study based on two questionnaire surveys in 2014 and 2015. Methods: The study involved 191 certified nursing assistants and registered nurses employed in Dutch home-care organizations (mean age of 50). These were members of the Dutch Nursing Staff Panel, a nationwide panel of nursing staff working in various healthcare settings. Results: Self-direction is positively related to nursing staff's job satisfaction. This relationship is partly mediated by autonomy over patient care. For certified nursing assistants and registered nurses with a bachelor's degree, a greater sense of autonomy over patient care in self-directed teams is positively related to job satisfaction. No significant association was found between autonomy over patient care and job satisfaction for registered nurses with an associate degree. Conclusions: This study suggests that home-care organizations should consider the use of self-directed teams as this increases nursing staff's job satisfaction and may therefore help to retain nursing staff in home care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2430-2440
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Advanced Nursing
Volume73
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2017

Cite this

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abstract = "Aims: The aims of this study were: (1) To examine whether working in a self-directed team is related to home-care nursing staff's job satisfaction; (2) To assess the mediating effect of self-perceived autonomy over patient care; (3) To investigate the moderating effect of educational level on the association between autonomy over patient care and job satisfaction. Background: Self-directed teams are being introduced in home care in several countries. It is unknown whether working in a self-directed team is related to nursing staff's job satisfaction. It is important to gain insight into this association since self-directed teams may help in retaining nursing staff. Design: A cross-sectional study based on two questionnaire surveys in 2014 and 2015. Methods: The study involved 191 certified nursing assistants and registered nurses employed in Dutch home-care organizations (mean age of 50). These were members of the Dutch Nursing Staff Panel, a nationwide panel of nursing staff working in various healthcare settings. Results: Self-direction is positively related to nursing staff's job satisfaction. This relationship is partly mediated by autonomy over patient care. For certified nursing assistants and registered nurses with a bachelor's degree, a greater sense of autonomy over patient care in self-directed teams is positively related to job satisfaction. No significant association was found between autonomy over patient care and job satisfaction for registered nurses with an associate degree. Conclusions: This study suggests that home-care organizations should consider the use of self-directed teams as this increases nursing staff's job satisfaction and may therefore help to retain nursing staff in home care.",
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Home-care nursing staff in self-directed teams are more satisfied with their job and feel they have more autonomy over patient care : a nationwide survey. / Maurits, Erica E.M.; de Veer, Anke J.E.; Groenewegen, Peter P.; Francke, Anneke L.

In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol. 73, No. 10, 01.10.2017, p. 2430-2440.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - de Veer, Anke J.E.

AU - Groenewegen, Peter P.

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