Human parechovirus meningitis and gross-motor neurodevelopment in young children

MT van Hinsbergh, SCM de Crom, R. Lindeboom, AM Tutu-van Furth, CC Obihara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This multicenter prospective cohort study describes the impact of human parechovirus meningitis on gross-motor neurodevelopment of young children. Gross-motor function was measured using Alberta Infant Motor Scale. Of a total of 38 eligible children < 10 months of age at onset, nine cases had clinical evidence of meningitis and polymerase chain reaction positive for human parechovirus in cerebrospinal fluid; 11 had no meningitis and polymerase chain reaction positive for human parechovirus in nasopharyngeal aspirate, blood, urine, or feces; and in 18, no pathogen was identified (reference group).The children with human parechovirus meningitis showed more frequent albeit not statistically significant suspect gross-motor function delay (mean Z-score (standard deviation) - 1.69 (1.05)) than children with human parechovirus infection-elsewhere (- 1.38 (1.51)). The reference group did not fall in the range of suspect gross-motor function delay (- 0.96 (1.07)). Adjustment for age at onset and maternal education did not alter the results.Conclusion: Six months after infection, children with human parechovirus meningitis showed more frequent albeit not statistically significant suspect gross-motor function delay compared to the population norm and other two groups. Longitudinal studies in larger samples and longer follow-up periods are needed to confirm the impact and persistence of human parechovirus meningitis on neurodevelopment in young children. What is Known: • Human parechovirus is progressively becoming a major viral cause of meningitis in children. • There is keen interest in the development of affected infants with human parechovirus meningitis. What is New: • This study describes prospectively gross-motor functional delay in children with both clinical evidence of meningitis and polymerase chain reaction positive for human parechovirus in cerebrospinal fluid. • It shows the importance of screening young children for developmental delay in order to refer those with delay for early intervention to maximize their developmental potential.

LanguageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Pediatrics
VolumeIn press
Early online date14 Jan 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Cite this

van Hinsbergh, MT ; de Crom, SCM ; Lindeboom, R. ; Tutu-van Furth, AM ; Obihara, CC. / Human parechovirus meningitis and gross-motor neurodevelopment in young children. In: European Journal of Pediatrics. 2019 ; Vol. In press.
@article{c295e4c550a447659b7bc39227c5aa24,
title = "Human parechovirus meningitis and gross-motor neurodevelopment in young children",
abstract = "This multicenter prospective cohort study describes the impact of human parechovirus meningitis on gross-motor neurodevelopment of young children. Gross-motor function was measured using Alberta Infant Motor Scale. Of a total of 38 eligible children < 10 months of age at onset, nine cases had clinical evidence of meningitis and polymerase chain reaction positive for human parechovirus in cerebrospinal fluid; 11 had no meningitis and polymerase chain reaction positive for human parechovirus in nasopharyngeal aspirate, blood, urine, or feces; and in 18, no pathogen was identified (reference group).The children with human parechovirus meningitis showed more frequent albeit not statistically significant suspect gross-motor function delay (mean Z-score (standard deviation) - 1.69 (1.05)) than children with human parechovirus infection-elsewhere (- 1.38 (1.51)). The reference group did not fall in the range of suspect gross-motor function delay (- 0.96 (1.07)). Adjustment for age at onset and maternal education did not alter the results.Conclusion: Six months after infection, children with human parechovirus meningitis showed more frequent albeit not statistically significant suspect gross-motor function delay compared to the population norm and other two groups. Longitudinal studies in larger samples and longer follow-up periods are needed to confirm the impact and persistence of human parechovirus meningitis on neurodevelopment in young children. What is Known: • Human parechovirus is progressively becoming a major viral cause of meningitis in children. • There is keen interest in the development of affected infants with human parechovirus meningitis. What is New: • This study describes prospectively gross-motor functional delay in children with both clinical evidence of meningitis and polymerase chain reaction positive for human parechovirus in cerebrospinal fluid. • It shows the importance of screening young children for developmental delay in order to refer those with delay for early intervention to maximize their developmental potential.",
author = "{van Hinsbergh}, MT and {de Crom}, SCM and R. Lindeboom and {Tutu-van Furth}, AM and CC Obihara",
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Human parechovirus meningitis and gross-motor neurodevelopment in young children. / van Hinsbergh, MT; de Crom, SCM; Lindeboom, R.; Tutu-van Furth, AM; Obihara, CC.

In: European Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. In press, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Human parechovirus meningitis and gross-motor neurodevelopment in young children

AU - van Hinsbergh, MT

AU - de Crom, SCM

AU - Lindeboom, R.

AU - Tutu-van Furth, AM

AU - Obihara, CC

PY - 2019

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N2 - This multicenter prospective cohort study describes the impact of human parechovirus meningitis on gross-motor neurodevelopment of young children. Gross-motor function was measured using Alberta Infant Motor Scale. Of a total of 38 eligible children < 10 months of age at onset, nine cases had clinical evidence of meningitis and polymerase chain reaction positive for human parechovirus in cerebrospinal fluid; 11 had no meningitis and polymerase chain reaction positive for human parechovirus in nasopharyngeal aspirate, blood, urine, or feces; and in 18, no pathogen was identified (reference group).The children with human parechovirus meningitis showed more frequent albeit not statistically significant suspect gross-motor function delay (mean Z-score (standard deviation) - 1.69 (1.05)) than children with human parechovirus infection-elsewhere (- 1.38 (1.51)). The reference group did not fall in the range of suspect gross-motor function delay (- 0.96 (1.07)). Adjustment for age at onset and maternal education did not alter the results.Conclusion: Six months after infection, children with human parechovirus meningitis showed more frequent albeit not statistically significant suspect gross-motor function delay compared to the population norm and other two groups. Longitudinal studies in larger samples and longer follow-up periods are needed to confirm the impact and persistence of human parechovirus meningitis on neurodevelopment in young children. What is Known: • Human parechovirus is progressively becoming a major viral cause of meningitis in children. • There is keen interest in the development of affected infants with human parechovirus meningitis. What is New: • This study describes prospectively gross-motor functional delay in children with both clinical evidence of meningitis and polymerase chain reaction positive for human parechovirus in cerebrospinal fluid. • It shows the importance of screening young children for developmental delay in order to refer those with delay for early intervention to maximize their developmental potential.

AB - This multicenter prospective cohort study describes the impact of human parechovirus meningitis on gross-motor neurodevelopment of young children. Gross-motor function was measured using Alberta Infant Motor Scale. Of a total of 38 eligible children < 10 months of age at onset, nine cases had clinical evidence of meningitis and polymerase chain reaction positive for human parechovirus in cerebrospinal fluid; 11 had no meningitis and polymerase chain reaction positive for human parechovirus in nasopharyngeal aspirate, blood, urine, or feces; and in 18, no pathogen was identified (reference group).The children with human parechovirus meningitis showed more frequent albeit not statistically significant suspect gross-motor function delay (mean Z-score (standard deviation) - 1.69 (1.05)) than children with human parechovirus infection-elsewhere (- 1.38 (1.51)). The reference group did not fall in the range of suspect gross-motor function delay (- 0.96 (1.07)). Adjustment for age at onset and maternal education did not alter the results.Conclusion: Six months after infection, children with human parechovirus meningitis showed more frequent albeit not statistically significant suspect gross-motor function delay compared to the population norm and other two groups. Longitudinal studies in larger samples and longer follow-up periods are needed to confirm the impact and persistence of human parechovirus meningitis on neurodevelopment in young children. What is Known: • Human parechovirus is progressively becoming a major viral cause of meningitis in children. • There is keen interest in the development of affected infants with human parechovirus meningitis. What is New: • This study describes prospectively gross-motor functional delay in children with both clinical evidence of meningitis and polymerase chain reaction positive for human parechovirus in cerebrospinal fluid. • It shows the importance of screening young children for developmental delay in order to refer those with delay for early intervention to maximize their developmental potential.

U2 - 10.1007/s00431-019-03319-6

DO - 10.1007/s00431-019-03319-6

M3 - Article

VL - In press

JO - European Journal of Pediatrics

T2 - European Journal of Pediatrics

JF - European Journal of Pediatrics

SN - 0340-6199

ER -