Impact of communicating familial risk of diabetes on illness perceptions and self-reported behavioral outcomes: a randomized controlled trial

M. Pijl, D.R.M. Timmermans, E.A.M. Claassen, A.C.J.W. Janssens, M.G.A.A.M. Nijpels, J.M. Dekker, T.M. Marteau, L. Henneman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess the potential effectiveness of communicating familial risk of diabetes on illness perceptions and self-reported behavioral outcomes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Individuals with a family history of diabetes were randomized to receive risk information based on familial and general risk factors (n = 59) or general risk factors alone (n = 59). Outcomes were assessed using questionnaires at baseline, 1 week, and 3 months. RESULTS: Compared with individuals receiving general risk information, those receiving familial risk information perceived heredity to be a more important cause of diabetes (P <0.01) at 1-week follow-up, perceived greater control over preventing diabetes (P <0.05), and reported having eaten more healthily (P = 0.01) after 3 months. Behavioral intentions did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Communicating familial risk increased personal control and, thus, did not result in fatalism. Although the intervention did not influence intentions to change behavior, there was some evidence to suggest it increases healthy behavior
Original languageUndefined/Unknown
Pages (from-to)597-599
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Cite this

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title = "Impact of communicating familial risk of diabetes on illness perceptions and self-reported behavioral outcomes: a randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To assess the potential effectiveness of communicating familial risk of diabetes on illness perceptions and self-reported behavioral outcomes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Individuals with a family history of diabetes were randomized to receive risk information based on familial and general risk factors (n = 59) or general risk factors alone (n = 59). Outcomes were assessed using questionnaires at baseline, 1 week, and 3 months. RESULTS: Compared with individuals receiving general risk information, those receiving familial risk information perceived heredity to be a more important cause of diabetes (P <0.01) at 1-week follow-up, perceived greater control over preventing diabetes (P <0.05), and reported having eaten more healthily (P = 0.01) after 3 months. Behavioral intentions did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Communicating familial risk increased personal control and, thus, did not result in fatalism. Although the intervention did not influence intentions to change behavior, there was some evidence to suggest it increases healthy behavior",
author = "M. Pijl and D.R.M. Timmermans and E.A.M. Claassen and A.C.J.W. Janssens and M.G.A.A.M. Nijpels and J.M. Dekker and T.M. Marteau and L. Henneman",
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doi = "10.2337/dc08-1049",
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pages = "597--599",
journal = "Diabetes Care",
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Impact of communicating familial risk of diabetes on illness perceptions and self-reported behavioral outcomes: a randomized controlled trial. / Pijl, M.; Timmermans, D.R.M.; Claassen, E.A.M.; Janssens, A.C.J.W.; Nijpels, M.G.A.A.M.; Dekker, J.M.; Marteau, T.M.; Henneman, L.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 32, No. 4, 2009, p. 597-599.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of communicating familial risk of diabetes on illness perceptions and self-reported behavioral outcomes: a randomized controlled trial

AU - Pijl, M.

AU - Timmermans, D.R.M.

AU - Claassen, E.A.M.

AU - Janssens, A.C.J.W.

AU - Nijpels, M.G.A.A.M.

AU - Dekker, J.M.

AU - Marteau, T.M.

AU - Henneman, L.

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the potential effectiveness of communicating familial risk of diabetes on illness perceptions and self-reported behavioral outcomes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Individuals with a family history of diabetes were randomized to receive risk information based on familial and general risk factors (n = 59) or general risk factors alone (n = 59). Outcomes were assessed using questionnaires at baseline, 1 week, and 3 months. RESULTS: Compared with individuals receiving general risk information, those receiving familial risk information perceived heredity to be a more important cause of diabetes (P <0.01) at 1-week follow-up, perceived greater control over preventing diabetes (P <0.05), and reported having eaten more healthily (P = 0.01) after 3 months. Behavioral intentions did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Communicating familial risk increased personal control and, thus, did not result in fatalism. Although the intervention did not influence intentions to change behavior, there was some evidence to suggest it increases healthy behavior

AB - OBJECTIVE: To assess the potential effectiveness of communicating familial risk of diabetes on illness perceptions and self-reported behavioral outcomes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Individuals with a family history of diabetes were randomized to receive risk information based on familial and general risk factors (n = 59) or general risk factors alone (n = 59). Outcomes were assessed using questionnaires at baseline, 1 week, and 3 months. RESULTS: Compared with individuals receiving general risk information, those receiving familial risk information perceived heredity to be a more important cause of diabetes (P <0.01) at 1-week follow-up, perceived greater control over preventing diabetes (P <0.05), and reported having eaten more healthily (P = 0.01) after 3 months. Behavioral intentions did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Communicating familial risk increased personal control and, thus, did not result in fatalism. Although the intervention did not influence intentions to change behavior, there was some evidence to suggest it increases healthy behavior

U2 - 10.2337/dc08-1049

DO - 10.2337/dc08-1049

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 597

EP - 599

JO - Diabetes Care

JF - Diabetes Care

SN - 0149-5992

IS - 4

ER -