Impact of SNR, masker type and noise reduction processing on sentence recognition performance and listening effort as indicated by the pupil dilation response

Barbara Ohlenforst, Dorothea Wendt, Sophia E. Kramer, Graham Naylor, Adriana A. Zekveld, Thomas Lunner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that activating the noise reduction scheme in hearing aids results in a smaller peak pupil dilation (PPD), indicating reduced listening effort, at 50% and 95% correct sentence recognition with a 4-talker masker. The objective of this study was to measure the effect of the noise reduction scheme (on or off) on PPD and sentence recognition across a wide range of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) from +16 dB to −12 dB and two masker types (4-talker and stationary noise). Relatively low PPDs were observed at very low (−12 dB) and very high (+16 dB to +8 dB) SNRs presumably due to ‘giving up’ and ‘easy listening’, respectively. The maximum PPD was observed with SNRs at approximately 50% correct sentence recognition. Sentence recognition with both masker types was significantly improved by the noise reduction scheme, which corresponds to the shift in performance from SNR function at approximately 5 dB toward a lower SNR. This intelligibility effect was accompanied by a corresponding effect on the PPD, shifting the peak by approximately 4 dB toward a lower SNR. In addition, with the 4-talker masker, when the noise reduction scheme was active, the PPD was smaller overall than that when the scheme was inactive. We conclude that with the 4-talker masker, noise reduction scheme processing provides a listening effort benefit in addition to any effect associated with improved intelligibility. Thus, the effect of the noise reduction scheme on listening effort incorporates more than can be explained by intelligibility alone, emphasizing the potential importance of measuring listening effort in addition to traditional speech reception measures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-99
Number of pages10
JournalHearing Research
Volume365
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018

Cite this

@article{16f694ae7e4c49b3a449342bc18b5883,
title = "Impact of SNR, masker type and noise reduction processing on sentence recognition performance and listening effort as indicated by the pupil dilation response",
abstract = "Recent studies have shown that activating the noise reduction scheme in hearing aids results in a smaller peak pupil dilation (PPD), indicating reduced listening effort, at 50{\%} and 95{\%} correct sentence recognition with a 4-talker masker. The objective of this study was to measure the effect of the noise reduction scheme (on or off) on PPD and sentence recognition across a wide range of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) from +16 dB to −12 dB and two masker types (4-talker and stationary noise). Relatively low PPDs were observed at very low (−12 dB) and very high (+16 dB to +8 dB) SNRs presumably due to ‘giving up’ and ‘easy listening’, respectively. The maximum PPD was observed with SNRs at approximately 50{\%} correct sentence recognition. Sentence recognition with both masker types was significantly improved by the noise reduction scheme, which corresponds to the shift in performance from SNR function at approximately 5 dB toward a lower SNR. This intelligibility effect was accompanied by a corresponding effect on the PPD, shifting the peak by approximately 4 dB toward a lower SNR. In addition, with the 4-talker masker, when the noise reduction scheme was active, the PPD was smaller overall than that when the scheme was inactive. We conclude that with the 4-talker masker, noise reduction scheme processing provides a listening effort benefit in addition to any effect associated with improved intelligibility. Thus, the effect of the noise reduction scheme on listening effort incorporates more than can be explained by intelligibility alone, emphasizing the potential importance of measuring listening effort in addition to traditional speech reception measures.",
keywords = "Hearing aids, Hearing impairment, Listening effort, Noise reduction scheme, Pupil dilation, Signal-to-noise ratio, Speech recognition",
author = "Barbara Ohlenforst and Dorothea Wendt and Kramer, {Sophia E.} and Graham Naylor and Zekveld, {Adriana A.} and Thomas Lunner",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.heares.2018.05.003",
language = "English",
volume = "365",
pages = "90--99",
journal = "Hearing Research",
issn = "0378-5955",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

Impact of SNR, masker type and noise reduction processing on sentence recognition performance and listening effort as indicated by the pupil dilation response. / Ohlenforst, Barbara; Wendt, Dorothea; Kramer, Sophia E.; Naylor, Graham; Zekveld, Adriana A.; Lunner, Thomas.

In: Hearing Research, Vol. 365, 01.08.2018, p. 90-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of SNR, masker type and noise reduction processing on sentence recognition performance and listening effort as indicated by the pupil dilation response

AU - Ohlenforst, Barbara

AU - Wendt, Dorothea

AU - Kramer, Sophia E.

AU - Naylor, Graham

AU - Zekveld, Adriana A.

AU - Lunner, Thomas

PY - 2018/8/1

Y1 - 2018/8/1

N2 - Recent studies have shown that activating the noise reduction scheme in hearing aids results in a smaller peak pupil dilation (PPD), indicating reduced listening effort, at 50% and 95% correct sentence recognition with a 4-talker masker. The objective of this study was to measure the effect of the noise reduction scheme (on or off) on PPD and sentence recognition across a wide range of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) from +16 dB to −12 dB and two masker types (4-talker and stationary noise). Relatively low PPDs were observed at very low (−12 dB) and very high (+16 dB to +8 dB) SNRs presumably due to ‘giving up’ and ‘easy listening’, respectively. The maximum PPD was observed with SNRs at approximately 50% correct sentence recognition. Sentence recognition with both masker types was significantly improved by the noise reduction scheme, which corresponds to the shift in performance from SNR function at approximately 5 dB toward a lower SNR. This intelligibility effect was accompanied by a corresponding effect on the PPD, shifting the peak by approximately 4 dB toward a lower SNR. In addition, with the 4-talker masker, when the noise reduction scheme was active, the PPD was smaller overall than that when the scheme was inactive. We conclude that with the 4-talker masker, noise reduction scheme processing provides a listening effort benefit in addition to any effect associated with improved intelligibility. Thus, the effect of the noise reduction scheme on listening effort incorporates more than can be explained by intelligibility alone, emphasizing the potential importance of measuring listening effort in addition to traditional speech reception measures.

AB - Recent studies have shown that activating the noise reduction scheme in hearing aids results in a smaller peak pupil dilation (PPD), indicating reduced listening effort, at 50% and 95% correct sentence recognition with a 4-talker masker. The objective of this study was to measure the effect of the noise reduction scheme (on or off) on PPD and sentence recognition across a wide range of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) from +16 dB to −12 dB and two masker types (4-talker and stationary noise). Relatively low PPDs were observed at very low (−12 dB) and very high (+16 dB to +8 dB) SNRs presumably due to ‘giving up’ and ‘easy listening’, respectively. The maximum PPD was observed with SNRs at approximately 50% correct sentence recognition. Sentence recognition with both masker types was significantly improved by the noise reduction scheme, which corresponds to the shift in performance from SNR function at approximately 5 dB toward a lower SNR. This intelligibility effect was accompanied by a corresponding effect on the PPD, shifting the peak by approximately 4 dB toward a lower SNR. In addition, with the 4-talker masker, when the noise reduction scheme was active, the PPD was smaller overall than that when the scheme was inactive. We conclude that with the 4-talker masker, noise reduction scheme processing provides a listening effort benefit in addition to any effect associated with improved intelligibility. Thus, the effect of the noise reduction scheme on listening effort incorporates more than can be explained by intelligibility alone, emphasizing the potential importance of measuring listening effort in addition to traditional speech reception measures.

KW - Hearing aids

KW - Hearing impairment

KW - Listening effort

KW - Noise reduction scheme

KW - Pupil dilation

KW - Signal-to-noise ratio

KW - Speech recognition

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85047064322&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.heares.2018.05.003

DO - 10.1016/j.heares.2018.05.003

M3 - Article

VL - 365

SP - 90

EP - 99

JO - Hearing Research

JF - Hearing Research

SN - 0378-5955

ER -