In-Hospital Mobilization, Physical Fitness, and Physical Functioning After Lung Cancer Surgery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Apart from clinical experience and theoretical considerations, there is a lack of evidence that the level of adherence to in-hospital mobilization protocols is related to functional recovery in patients after resection for lung cancer. The objectives of the study were to determine (1)the relationship between adherence to the in-hospital mobilization protocol and physical fitness at hospital discharge and (2)the value of physical fitness measures at discharge in predicting physical functioning 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively. Methods: This observational study included 62 patients who underwent surgical resection for lung cancer. Adherence to the in-hospital mobilization protocol was abstracted from patients’ records. Physical fitness measures before the operation and at hospital discharge included handgrip strength, 30-second sit-to-stand test, and 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Self-reported physical functioning was assessed preoperatively and 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively, using the Medical Outcome Study 36-Item Short Form (SF-36)Physical Function subscale (RAND Corp, Santa Monica, CA). Linear regression analyses were used to estimate the relationships of interest, adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Level of adherence to the mobilization protocol was significantly and independently related to handgrip strength, sit-to-stand test, and 6MWT at discharge. Handgrip strength and 6MWT at discharge significantly predicted SF-36 Physical Function at 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively. The sit-to-stand test only predicted SF-36 Physical Function at 6 weeks. Conclusions: Suboptimal postoperative mobilization after surgical resection for lung cancer negatively affects physical fitness at discharge. Our results underline the importance of adherence to early postoperative mobilization protocols. Measuring physical fitness at discharge may be useful to inform clinicians on elective referral of patients for postdischarge rehabilitation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1639-1646
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume107
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Cite this

@article{8291eca07569474e85ebb6486f8e3f3d,
title = "In-Hospital Mobilization, Physical Fitness, and Physical Functioning After Lung Cancer Surgery",
abstract = "Background: Apart from clinical experience and theoretical considerations, there is a lack of evidence that the level of adherence to in-hospital mobilization protocols is related to functional recovery in patients after resection for lung cancer. The objectives of the study were to determine (1)the relationship between adherence to the in-hospital mobilization protocol and physical fitness at hospital discharge and (2)the value of physical fitness measures at discharge in predicting physical functioning 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively. Methods: This observational study included 62 patients who underwent surgical resection for lung cancer. Adherence to the in-hospital mobilization protocol was abstracted from patients’ records. Physical fitness measures before the operation and at hospital discharge included handgrip strength, 30-second sit-to-stand test, and 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Self-reported physical functioning was assessed preoperatively and 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively, using the Medical Outcome Study 36-Item Short Form (SF-36)Physical Function subscale (RAND Corp, Santa Monica, CA). Linear regression analyses were used to estimate the relationships of interest, adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Level of adherence to the mobilization protocol was significantly and independently related to handgrip strength, sit-to-stand test, and 6MWT at discharge. Handgrip strength and 6MWT at discharge significantly predicted SF-36 Physical Function at 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively. The sit-to-stand test only predicted SF-36 Physical Function at 6 weeks. Conclusions: Suboptimal postoperative mobilization after surgical resection for lung cancer negatively affects physical fitness at discharge. Our results underline the importance of adherence to early postoperative mobilization protocols. Measuring physical fitness at discharge may be useful to inform clinicians on elective referral of patients for postdischarge rehabilitation.",
author = "{van der Leeden}, Marike and Chlo{\'e} Balland and Edwin Geleijn and Huijsmans, {Rosalie J.} and Joost Dekker and Paul, {Marinus A.} and Chris Dickhoff and Stuiver, {Martijn M.}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1016/j.athoracsur.2018.12.045",
language = "English",
volume = "107",
pages = "1639--1646",
journal = "The Annals of Thoracic Surgery",
issn = "0003-4975",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "6",

}

In-Hospital Mobilization, Physical Fitness, and Physical Functioning After Lung Cancer Surgery. / van der Leeden, Marike; Balland, Chloé; Geleijn, Edwin; Huijsmans, Rosalie J.; Dekker, Joost; Paul, Marinus A.; Dickhoff, Chris; Stuiver, Martijn M.

In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 107, No. 6, 2019, p. 1639-1646.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - In-Hospital Mobilization, Physical Fitness, and Physical Functioning After Lung Cancer Surgery

AU - van der Leeden, Marike

AU - Balland, Chloé

AU - Geleijn, Edwin

AU - Huijsmans, Rosalie J.

AU - Dekker, Joost

AU - Paul, Marinus A.

AU - Dickhoff, Chris

AU - Stuiver, Martijn M.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Background: Apart from clinical experience and theoretical considerations, there is a lack of evidence that the level of adherence to in-hospital mobilization protocols is related to functional recovery in patients after resection for lung cancer. The objectives of the study were to determine (1)the relationship between adherence to the in-hospital mobilization protocol and physical fitness at hospital discharge and (2)the value of physical fitness measures at discharge in predicting physical functioning 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively. Methods: This observational study included 62 patients who underwent surgical resection for lung cancer. Adherence to the in-hospital mobilization protocol was abstracted from patients’ records. Physical fitness measures before the operation and at hospital discharge included handgrip strength, 30-second sit-to-stand test, and 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Self-reported physical functioning was assessed preoperatively and 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively, using the Medical Outcome Study 36-Item Short Form (SF-36)Physical Function subscale (RAND Corp, Santa Monica, CA). Linear regression analyses were used to estimate the relationships of interest, adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Level of adherence to the mobilization protocol was significantly and independently related to handgrip strength, sit-to-stand test, and 6MWT at discharge. Handgrip strength and 6MWT at discharge significantly predicted SF-36 Physical Function at 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively. The sit-to-stand test only predicted SF-36 Physical Function at 6 weeks. Conclusions: Suboptimal postoperative mobilization after surgical resection for lung cancer negatively affects physical fitness at discharge. Our results underline the importance of adherence to early postoperative mobilization protocols. Measuring physical fitness at discharge may be useful to inform clinicians on elective referral of patients for postdischarge rehabilitation.

AB - Background: Apart from clinical experience and theoretical considerations, there is a lack of evidence that the level of adherence to in-hospital mobilization protocols is related to functional recovery in patients after resection for lung cancer. The objectives of the study were to determine (1)the relationship between adherence to the in-hospital mobilization protocol and physical fitness at hospital discharge and (2)the value of physical fitness measures at discharge in predicting physical functioning 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively. Methods: This observational study included 62 patients who underwent surgical resection for lung cancer. Adherence to the in-hospital mobilization protocol was abstracted from patients’ records. Physical fitness measures before the operation and at hospital discharge included handgrip strength, 30-second sit-to-stand test, and 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Self-reported physical functioning was assessed preoperatively and 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively, using the Medical Outcome Study 36-Item Short Form (SF-36)Physical Function subscale (RAND Corp, Santa Monica, CA). Linear regression analyses were used to estimate the relationships of interest, adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Level of adherence to the mobilization protocol was significantly and independently related to handgrip strength, sit-to-stand test, and 6MWT at discharge. Handgrip strength and 6MWT at discharge significantly predicted SF-36 Physical Function at 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively. The sit-to-stand test only predicted SF-36 Physical Function at 6 weeks. Conclusions: Suboptimal postoperative mobilization after surgical resection for lung cancer negatively affects physical fitness at discharge. Our results underline the importance of adherence to early postoperative mobilization protocols. Measuring physical fitness at discharge may be useful to inform clinicians on elective referral of patients for postdischarge rehabilitation.

UR - https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85064989322&origin=inward

UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30690020

U2 - 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2018.12.045

DO - 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2018.12.045

M3 - Article

VL - 107

SP - 1639

EP - 1646

JO - The Annals of Thoracic Surgery

JF - The Annals of Thoracic Surgery

SN - 0003-4975

IS - 6

ER -