In vitro endothelial hyperpermeability occurs early following traumatic hemorrhagic shock

Anoek L I van Leeuwen, David N Naumann, Nicole A M Dekker, Peter L Hordijk, Sam D Hutchings, Christa Boer, Charissa E van den Brom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Endothelial hyperpermeability is suggested to play a role in the development of microcirculatory perfusion disturbances and organ failure following hemorrhagic shock, but evidence is limited.

OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of plasma from traumatic hemorrhagic shock patients on in vitro endothelial barrier function.

METHODS: Plasma from traumatic hemorrhagic shock patients was obtained at the emergency department (ED), the intensive care unit (ICU), 24 h after ICU admission and from controls (n = 8). Sublingual microcirculatory perfusion was measured using incident dark field videomicroscopy at matching time points. Using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing, the effects of plasma exposure on in vitro endothelial barrier function of human endothelial cells were assessed.

RESULTS: Plasma from traumatic hemorrhagic shock patients collected at ED admission induced a 19% loss of in vitro endothelial resistance compared to plasma from controls (p < 0.001). This loss was due to reduced cell-cell contacts (p < 0.01). Plasma withdrawn at later time points did not affect endothelial barrier function (p > 0.99). Interestingly, in vitro endothelial resistance showed a positive association with in vivo microcirculatory perfusion (r = 0.56, p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS: Plasma from traumatic hemorrhagic shock patients obtained following ED admission, but not at later stages, induced in vitro endothelial hyperpermeability. This coincided with in vivo microcirculatory perfusion disturbances.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Jan 2020

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