Incubation of methamphetamine and palatable food craving after punishment-induced abstinence

Irina N. Krasnova, Nathan J. Marchant, Bruce Ladenheim, Michael T. McCoy, Leigh V. Panlilio, Jennifer M. Bossert, Yavin Shaham, Jean L. Cadet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

In a rat model of drug craving and relapse, cue-induced drug seeking progressively increases after withdrawal from methamphetamine and other drugs, a phenomenon termed 'incubation of drug craving'. However, current experimental procedures used to study incubation of drug craving do not incorporate negative consequences of drug use, which is a common factor promoting abstinence in humans. Here, we studied whether incubation of methamphetamine craving is observed after suppression of drug seeking by adverse consequences (punishment). We trained rats to self-administer methamphetamine or palatable food for 9 h per day for 14 days; reward delivery was paired with a tone-light cue. Subsequently, for one group within each reward type, 50% of the lever-presses were punished by mild footshock for 9-10 days, whereas for the other group lever-presses were not punished. Shock intensity was gradually increased over time. Next, we assessed cue-induced reward seeking in 1-h extinction sessions on withdrawal days 2 and 21. Response-contingent punishment suppressed extended-access methamphetamine or food self-administration; surprisingly, food-trained rats showed greater resistance to punishment than methamphetamine-trained rats. During the relapse tests, both punished and unpunished methamphetamine- and food-trained rats showed significantly higher cue-induced reward seeking on withdrawal day 21 than on day 2. These results demonstrate that incubation of both methamphetamine and food craving occur after punishment-induced suppression of methamphetamine or palatable food self-administration. Our procedure can be used to investigate mechanisms of relapse to drug and palatable food seeking under conditions that more closely approximate the human condition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2008-2016
Number of pages9
JournalNeuropsychopharmacology
Volume39
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

Cite this

Krasnova, I. N., Marchant, N. J., Ladenheim, B., McCoy, M. T., Panlilio, L. V., Bossert, J. M., ... Cadet, J. L. (2014). Incubation of methamphetamine and palatable food craving after punishment-induced abstinence. Neuropsychopharmacology, 39(8), 2008-2016. https://doi.org/10.1038/npp.2014.50
Krasnova, Irina N. ; Marchant, Nathan J. ; Ladenheim, Bruce ; McCoy, Michael T. ; Panlilio, Leigh V. ; Bossert, Jennifer M. ; Shaham, Yavin ; Cadet, Jean L. / Incubation of methamphetamine and palatable food craving after punishment-induced abstinence. In: Neuropsychopharmacology. 2014 ; Vol. 39, No. 8. pp. 2008-2016.
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Krasnova, IN, Marchant, NJ, Ladenheim, B, McCoy, MT, Panlilio, LV, Bossert, JM, Shaham, Y & Cadet, JL 2014, 'Incubation of methamphetamine and palatable food craving after punishment-induced abstinence' Neuropsychopharmacology, vol. 39, no. 8, pp. 2008-2016. https://doi.org/10.1038/npp.2014.50

Incubation of methamphetamine and palatable food craving after punishment-induced abstinence. / Krasnova, Irina N.; Marchant, Nathan J.; Ladenheim, Bruce; McCoy, Michael T.; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Bossert, Jennifer M.; Shaham, Yavin; Cadet, Jean L.

In: Neuropsychopharmacology, Vol. 39, No. 8, 01.01.2014, p. 2008-2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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