Is being malnourished according to the ESPEN definition for malnutrition associated with clinically relevant outcome measures in geriatric outpatients?

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Abstract

Background and aim: A body of evidence is supporting the association between (the risk of) malnutrition in relation to physical performance, muscle strength, risk for depression and cognitive status in geriatric outpatients. Associations between being malnourished according to the newly proposed ESPEN definition for malnutrition and clinically relevant outcome measures of the aforementioned variables have not been confirmed yet. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the association between being malnourished according to the ESPEN definition and clinically relevant outcome measures in geriatric outpatients. Methods: Associations between malnutrition and handgrip strength (HGS, kg), short physical performance battery (SPPB-score, points), timed up and go test (TUG, seconds), and hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS depression score, points), were analysed using linear regression. History of falls (falls, yes/no) and a low score on the Mini Mental-State Examination (MMSE-score ≤ 24 points) were analysed using logistic regression. All analyses were adjusted for age and gender. Results: A total of 185 geriatric outpatients (60% women) were included. The mean age was 82 (± 7.3) years. Being malnourished (8.2%) according to the ESPEN definition was significantly associated with a lower HGS (− 3.38 kg, p = 0.031), lower SPPB score (− 1.8 point, p = 0.025), higher TUG time (1.35 times higher time, p = 0.020) and higher HADS depression score (2.03 times higher score, p = 0.007). Being malnourished tended towards an association with falls (OR 3.84, p = 0.087). No significant association was found with low MMSE score (OR 2.61, p = 0.110). Conclusion: This study is the first to confirm the association between being malnourished, defined by the ESPEN definition and clinically relevant outcome measures in geriatric outpatients.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)389-394
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Geriatric Medicine
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Cite this

@article{f8ecf48b0bbd43e28d89a3e09ab77ffe,
title = "Is being malnourished according to the ESPEN definition for malnutrition associated with clinically relevant outcome measures in geriatric outpatients?",
abstract = "Background and aim: A body of evidence is supporting the association between (the risk of) malnutrition in relation to physical performance, muscle strength, risk for depression and cognitive status in geriatric outpatients. Associations between being malnourished according to the newly proposed ESPEN definition for malnutrition and clinically relevant outcome measures of the aforementioned variables have not been confirmed yet. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the association between being malnourished according to the ESPEN definition and clinically relevant outcome measures in geriatric outpatients. Methods: Associations between malnutrition and handgrip strength (HGS, kg), short physical performance battery (SPPB-score, points), timed up and go test (TUG, seconds), and hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS depression score, points), were analysed using linear regression. History of falls (falls, yes/no) and a low score on the Mini Mental-State Examination (MMSE-score ≤ 24 points) were analysed using logistic regression. All analyses were adjusted for age and gender. Results: A total of 185 geriatric outpatients (60{\%} women) were included. The mean age was 82 (± 7.3) years. Being malnourished (8.2{\%}) according to the ESPEN definition was significantly associated with a lower HGS (− 3.38 kg, p = 0.031), lower SPPB score (− 1.8 point, p = 0.025), higher TUG time (1.35 times higher time, p = 0.020) and higher HADS depression score (2.03 times higher score, p = 0.007). Being malnourished tended towards an association with falls (OR 3.84, p = 0.087). No significant association was found with low MMSE score (OR 2.61, p = 0.110). Conclusion: This study is the first to confirm the association between being malnourished, defined by the ESPEN definition and clinically relevant outcome measures in geriatric outpatients.",
author = "{van Rijssen}, {N. M.} and Rojer, {A. G. M.} and Trappenburg, {M. C.} and Reijnierse, {E. M.} and Meskers, {C. G. M.} and Maier, {A. B.} and {de van der Schueren}, {M. A. E.}",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1007/s41999-018-0057-z",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "389--394",
journal = "European Geriatric Medicine",
issn = "1878-7649",
publisher = "Elsevier Masson",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is being malnourished according to the ESPEN definition for malnutrition associated with clinically relevant outcome measures in geriatric outpatients?

AU - van Rijssen, N. M.

AU - Rojer, A. G. M.

AU - Trappenburg, M. C.

AU - Reijnierse, E. M.

AU - Meskers, C. G. M.

AU - Maier, A. B.

AU - de van der Schueren, M. A. E.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Background and aim: A body of evidence is supporting the association between (the risk of) malnutrition in relation to physical performance, muscle strength, risk for depression and cognitive status in geriatric outpatients. Associations between being malnourished according to the newly proposed ESPEN definition for malnutrition and clinically relevant outcome measures of the aforementioned variables have not been confirmed yet. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the association between being malnourished according to the ESPEN definition and clinically relevant outcome measures in geriatric outpatients. Methods: Associations between malnutrition and handgrip strength (HGS, kg), short physical performance battery (SPPB-score, points), timed up and go test (TUG, seconds), and hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS depression score, points), were analysed using linear regression. History of falls (falls, yes/no) and a low score on the Mini Mental-State Examination (MMSE-score ≤ 24 points) were analysed using logistic regression. All analyses were adjusted for age and gender. Results: A total of 185 geriatric outpatients (60% women) were included. The mean age was 82 (± 7.3) years. Being malnourished (8.2%) according to the ESPEN definition was significantly associated with a lower HGS (− 3.38 kg, p = 0.031), lower SPPB score (− 1.8 point, p = 0.025), higher TUG time (1.35 times higher time, p = 0.020) and higher HADS depression score (2.03 times higher score, p = 0.007). Being malnourished tended towards an association with falls (OR 3.84, p = 0.087). No significant association was found with low MMSE score (OR 2.61, p = 0.110). Conclusion: This study is the first to confirm the association between being malnourished, defined by the ESPEN definition and clinically relevant outcome measures in geriatric outpatients.

AB - Background and aim: A body of evidence is supporting the association between (the risk of) malnutrition in relation to physical performance, muscle strength, risk for depression and cognitive status in geriatric outpatients. Associations between being malnourished according to the newly proposed ESPEN definition for malnutrition and clinically relevant outcome measures of the aforementioned variables have not been confirmed yet. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the association between being malnourished according to the ESPEN definition and clinically relevant outcome measures in geriatric outpatients. Methods: Associations between malnutrition and handgrip strength (HGS, kg), short physical performance battery (SPPB-score, points), timed up and go test (TUG, seconds), and hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS depression score, points), were analysed using linear regression. History of falls (falls, yes/no) and a low score on the Mini Mental-State Examination (MMSE-score ≤ 24 points) were analysed using logistic regression. All analyses were adjusted for age and gender. Results: A total of 185 geriatric outpatients (60% women) were included. The mean age was 82 (± 7.3) years. Being malnourished (8.2%) according to the ESPEN definition was significantly associated with a lower HGS (− 3.38 kg, p = 0.031), lower SPPB score (− 1.8 point, p = 0.025), higher TUG time (1.35 times higher time, p = 0.020) and higher HADS depression score (2.03 times higher score, p = 0.007). Being malnourished tended towards an association with falls (OR 3.84, p = 0.087). No significant association was found with low MMSE score (OR 2.61, p = 0.110). Conclusion: This study is the first to confirm the association between being malnourished, defined by the ESPEN definition and clinically relevant outcome measures in geriatric outpatients.

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U2 - 10.1007/s41999-018-0057-z

DO - 10.1007/s41999-018-0057-z

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 389

EP - 394

JO - European Geriatric Medicine

JF - European Geriatric Medicine

SN - 1878-7649

IS - 3

ER -