Is early repopulation of macrophage-depleted lymph node independent of blood monocyte immigration?

R E Mebius, G Martens, J Brevé, F G Delemarre, G Kraal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Popliteal lymph nodes (LN) of mice were depleted of their macrophage (M phi) populations in the subcapsular sinus and medulla by subcutaneous injection of dichloromethylene diphosphonate (Cl2MDP)-containing liposomes into the footpads. Complete restoration of both M phi populations could be observed as late as 5 months after liposome administration. This relatively long repopulation time could be due to a depot of liposomes, directly killing all M phi precursors after extravasation into the interstitial tissue of the footpad. On the other hand, local interstitial precursors with very low turnover rates may have been depleted in the interstitial tissue of the hind leg. Therefore, two different types of experiments were performed; one in which M phi-depleted LN were replaced by control LN at various time points after liposome treatment, and another whereby M phi-depleted LN were transplanted into control animals. When liposome-treated, M phi-depleted LN were transplanted into control animals, a complete restoration of both populations in the subcapsular sinus and medulla could be observed within 5 weeks. Control LN transplanted into a Cl2MDP-liposome-treated leg showed a rapid disappearance of M phi from the subcapsular sinus and medulla and these cell populations remained absent for at least 7-8 weeks after liposome treatment, when the first cells started to reappear. Complete repopulation of these areas by M phi took as long as 15 weeks. Using labeled liposomes the presence of a continuous liposome depot was found to be very unlikely. These results suggest that the population of precursor cells that will give rise to M phi in the subcapsular sinus and medulla of a LN is probably contained within the interstitial tissue and is almost independent of precursor supply from the blood compartment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3041-4
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Journal of Immunology
Volume21
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1991

Cite this

@article{f46155b1bd6247489b986fe7e0186682,
title = "Is early repopulation of macrophage-depleted lymph node independent of blood monocyte immigration?",
abstract = "Popliteal lymph nodes (LN) of mice were depleted of their macrophage (M phi) populations in the subcapsular sinus and medulla by subcutaneous injection of dichloromethylene diphosphonate (Cl2MDP)-containing liposomes into the footpads. Complete restoration of both M phi populations could be observed as late as 5 months after liposome administration. This relatively long repopulation time could be due to a depot of liposomes, directly killing all M phi precursors after extravasation into the interstitial tissue of the footpad. On the other hand, local interstitial precursors with very low turnover rates may have been depleted in the interstitial tissue of the hind leg. Therefore, two different types of experiments were performed; one in which M phi-depleted LN were replaced by control LN at various time points after liposome treatment, and another whereby M phi-depleted LN were transplanted into control animals. When liposome-treated, M phi-depleted LN were transplanted into control animals, a complete restoration of both populations in the subcapsular sinus and medulla could be observed within 5 weeks. Control LN transplanted into a Cl2MDP-liposome-treated leg showed a rapid disappearance of M phi from the subcapsular sinus and medulla and these cell populations remained absent for at least 7-8 weeks after liposome treatment, when the first cells started to reappear. Complete repopulation of these areas by M phi took as long as 15 weeks. Using labeled liposomes the presence of a continuous liposome depot was found to be very unlikely. These results suggest that the population of precursor cells that will give rise to M phi in the subcapsular sinus and medulla of a LN is probably contained within the interstitial tissue and is almost independent of precursor supply from the blood compartment.",
keywords = "Animals, Cell Movement, Clodronic Acid/administration & dosage, Liposomes, Lymph Nodes/cytology, Macrophages/cytology, Mice, Monocytes/cytology",
author = "Mebius, {R E} and G Martens and J Brev{\'e} and Delemarre, {F G} and G Kraal",
year = "1991",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1002/eji.1830211221",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "3041--4",
journal = "European Journal of Immunology",
issn = "0014-2980",
publisher = "Wiley-VCH Verlag",
number = "12",

}

Is early repopulation of macrophage-depleted lymph node independent of blood monocyte immigration? / Mebius, R E; Martens, G; Brevé, J; Delemarre, F G; Kraal, G.

In: European Journal of Immunology, Vol. 21, No. 12, 12.1991, p. 3041-4.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is early repopulation of macrophage-depleted lymph node independent of blood monocyte immigration?

AU - Mebius, R E

AU - Martens, G

AU - Brevé, J

AU - Delemarre, F G

AU - Kraal, G

PY - 1991/12

Y1 - 1991/12

N2 - Popliteal lymph nodes (LN) of mice were depleted of their macrophage (M phi) populations in the subcapsular sinus and medulla by subcutaneous injection of dichloromethylene diphosphonate (Cl2MDP)-containing liposomes into the footpads. Complete restoration of both M phi populations could be observed as late as 5 months after liposome administration. This relatively long repopulation time could be due to a depot of liposomes, directly killing all M phi precursors after extravasation into the interstitial tissue of the footpad. On the other hand, local interstitial precursors with very low turnover rates may have been depleted in the interstitial tissue of the hind leg. Therefore, two different types of experiments were performed; one in which M phi-depleted LN were replaced by control LN at various time points after liposome treatment, and another whereby M phi-depleted LN were transplanted into control animals. When liposome-treated, M phi-depleted LN were transplanted into control animals, a complete restoration of both populations in the subcapsular sinus and medulla could be observed within 5 weeks. Control LN transplanted into a Cl2MDP-liposome-treated leg showed a rapid disappearance of M phi from the subcapsular sinus and medulla and these cell populations remained absent for at least 7-8 weeks after liposome treatment, when the first cells started to reappear. Complete repopulation of these areas by M phi took as long as 15 weeks. Using labeled liposomes the presence of a continuous liposome depot was found to be very unlikely. These results suggest that the population of precursor cells that will give rise to M phi in the subcapsular sinus and medulla of a LN is probably contained within the interstitial tissue and is almost independent of precursor supply from the blood compartment.

AB - Popliteal lymph nodes (LN) of mice were depleted of their macrophage (M phi) populations in the subcapsular sinus and medulla by subcutaneous injection of dichloromethylene diphosphonate (Cl2MDP)-containing liposomes into the footpads. Complete restoration of both M phi populations could be observed as late as 5 months after liposome administration. This relatively long repopulation time could be due to a depot of liposomes, directly killing all M phi precursors after extravasation into the interstitial tissue of the footpad. On the other hand, local interstitial precursors with very low turnover rates may have been depleted in the interstitial tissue of the hind leg. Therefore, two different types of experiments were performed; one in which M phi-depleted LN were replaced by control LN at various time points after liposome treatment, and another whereby M phi-depleted LN were transplanted into control animals. When liposome-treated, M phi-depleted LN were transplanted into control animals, a complete restoration of both populations in the subcapsular sinus and medulla could be observed within 5 weeks. Control LN transplanted into a Cl2MDP-liposome-treated leg showed a rapid disappearance of M phi from the subcapsular sinus and medulla and these cell populations remained absent for at least 7-8 weeks after liposome treatment, when the first cells started to reappear. Complete repopulation of these areas by M phi took as long as 15 weeks. Using labeled liposomes the presence of a continuous liposome depot was found to be very unlikely. These results suggest that the population of precursor cells that will give rise to M phi in the subcapsular sinus and medulla of a LN is probably contained within the interstitial tissue and is almost independent of precursor supply from the blood compartment.

KW - Animals

KW - Cell Movement

KW - Clodronic Acid/administration & dosage

KW - Liposomes

KW - Lymph Nodes/cytology

KW - Macrophages/cytology

KW - Mice

KW - Monocytes/cytology

U2 - 10.1002/eji.1830211221

DO - 10.1002/eji.1830211221

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 3041

EP - 3044

JO - European Journal of Immunology

JF - European Journal of Immunology

SN - 0014-2980

IS - 12

ER -