Is the relationship between increased knee muscle strength and improved physical function following exercise dependent on baseline physical function status?

Michelle Hall, Rana S. Hinman, Martin van der Esch, Marike van der Leeden, Jessica Kasza, Tim V. Wrigley, Ben R. Metcalf, Fiona Dobson, Kim L. Bennell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Clinical guidelines recommend knee muscle strengthening exercises to improve physical function. However, the amount of knee muscle strength increase needed for clinically relevant improvements in physical function is unclear. Understanding how much increase in knee muscle strength is associated with improved physical function could assist clinicians in providing appropriate strength gain targets for their patients in order to optimise outcomes from exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an increase in knee muscle strength is associated with improved self-reported physical function following exercise; and whether the relationship differs according to physical function status at baseline.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)271
JournalArthritis Research & Therapy
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Hall, Michelle ; Hinman, Rana S. ; van der Esch, Martin ; van der Leeden, Marike ; Kasza, Jessica ; Wrigley, Tim V. ; Metcalf, Ben R. ; Dobson, Fiona ; Bennell, Kim L. / Is the relationship between increased knee muscle strength and improved physical function following exercise dependent on baseline physical function status?. In: Arthritis Research & Therapy. 2017 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. 271.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Clinical guidelines recommend knee muscle strengthening exercises to improve physical function. However, the amount of knee muscle strength increase needed for clinically relevant improvements in physical function is unclear. Understanding how much increase in knee muscle strength is associated with improved physical function could assist clinicians in providing appropriate strength gain targets for their patients in order to optimise outcomes from exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an increase in knee muscle strength is associated with improved self-reported physical function following exercise; and whether the relationship differs according to physical function status at baseline.",
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Is the relationship between increased knee muscle strength and improved physical function following exercise dependent on baseline physical function status? / Hall, Michelle; Hinman, Rana S.; van der Esch, Martin; van der Leeden, Marike; Kasza, Jessica; Wrigley, Tim V.; Metcalf, Ben R.; Dobson, Fiona; Bennell, Kim L.

In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, Vol. 19, No. 1, 2017, p. 271.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Bennell, Kim L.

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