Lactic Acidosis in Prostate Cancer: Consider the Warburg Effect

Johannes C. van der Mijn, Mathijs J. Kuiper, Carl E.H. Siegert, Annabeth E. Wassenaar, Carel J.M. van Noesel, Aernout C. Ogilvie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Lactic acidosis is a commonly observed clinical condition that is associated with a poor prognosis, especially in malignancies. We describe a case of an 81-year-old patient who presented with symptoms of tachypnea and general discomfort. Arterial blood gas analysis showed a high anion gap acidosis with a lactate level of 9.5 mmol/L with respiratory compensation. CT scanning showed no signs of pulmonary embolism or other causes of impaired tissue oxygenation. Despite treatment with sodium bicarbonate, the patient developed an adrenalin-resistant cardiac arrest, most likely caused by the acidosis. Autopsy revealed Gleason score 5 + 5 metastatic prostate cancer as the most probable cause of the lactic acidosis. Next-generation sequencing indicated a nonsense mutation in the TP53 gene (887delA) and an activating mutation in the PIK3CA gene (1634A>G) as candidate molecular drivers. This case demonstrates the prevalence and clinical relevance of metabolic reprogramming, frequently referred to as “the Warburg effect,” in patients with prostate cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1085-1091
Number of pages7
JournalCase Reports in Oncology
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Nov 2017

Cite this

van der Mijn, J. C., Kuiper, M. J., Siegert, C. E. H., Wassenaar, A. E., van Noesel, C. J. M., & Ogilvie, A. C. (2017). Lactic Acidosis in Prostate Cancer: Consider the Warburg Effect. Case Reports in Oncology, 10(3), 1085-1091. https://doi.org/10.1159/000485242
van der Mijn, Johannes C. ; Kuiper, Mathijs J. ; Siegert, Carl E.H. ; Wassenaar, Annabeth E. ; van Noesel, Carel J.M. ; Ogilvie, Aernout C. / Lactic Acidosis in Prostate Cancer : Consider the Warburg Effect. In: Case Reports in Oncology. 2017 ; Vol. 10, No. 3. pp. 1085-1091.
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abstract = "Lactic acidosis is a commonly observed clinical condition that is associated with a poor prognosis, especially in malignancies. We describe a case of an 81-year-old patient who presented with symptoms of tachypnea and general discomfort. Arterial blood gas analysis showed a high anion gap acidosis with a lactate level of 9.5 mmol/L with respiratory compensation. CT scanning showed no signs of pulmonary embolism or other causes of impaired tissue oxygenation. Despite treatment with sodium bicarbonate, the patient developed an adrenalin-resistant cardiac arrest, most likely caused by the acidosis. Autopsy revealed Gleason score 5 + 5 metastatic prostate cancer as the most probable cause of the lactic acidosis. Next-generation sequencing indicated a nonsense mutation in the TP53 gene (887delA) and an activating mutation in the PIK3CA gene (1634A>G) as candidate molecular drivers. This case demonstrates the prevalence and clinical relevance of metabolic reprogramming, frequently referred to as “the Warburg effect,” in patients with prostate cancer.",
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van der Mijn, JC, Kuiper, MJ, Siegert, CEH, Wassenaar, AE, van Noesel, CJM & Ogilvie, AC 2017, 'Lactic Acidosis in Prostate Cancer: Consider the Warburg Effect' Case Reports in Oncology, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 1085-1091. https://doi.org/10.1159/000485242

Lactic Acidosis in Prostate Cancer : Consider the Warburg Effect. / van der Mijn, Johannes C.; Kuiper, Mathijs J.; Siegert, Carl E.H.; Wassenaar, Annabeth E.; van Noesel, Carel J.M.; Ogilvie, Aernout C.

In: Case Reports in Oncology, Vol. 10, No. 3, 16.11.2017, p. 1085-1091.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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van der Mijn JC, Kuiper MJ, Siegert CEH, Wassenaar AE, van Noesel CJM, Ogilvie AC. Lactic Acidosis in Prostate Cancer: Consider the Warburg Effect. Case Reports in Oncology. 2017 Nov 16;10(3):1085-1091. https://doi.org/10.1159/000485242