Learning in Practice: A Valuation of Context in Time-Variable Medical Training

Pim W Teunissen, Jennifer R Kogan, Olle Ten Cate, Larry D Gruppen, Lorelei A Lingard

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractAcademic

Abstract

The logical consequence of implementing competency-based education is moving to time-variable training. Competency-based, time-variable training (CBTVT) requires an understanding of how learners interact with their learning context and how that leads to competence. In this article, the authors discuss this relationship. They first explain that the time required to achieve competence in clinical practice depends on the availability of clinical experiences that are conducive to ongoing competence development. This requires both curricular flexibility in light of the differences in individual learners' development and a balance between longitudinal placements and transitions to different environments.Along with the deliberate use of the opportunities that learning environments offer, there is value for learners in spending ample time-in-context. For instance, guided independence is possible when trainees do not progress immediately after meeting curricular learning objectives. Next, the potential implications of CBTVT can be illustrated by two learning perspectives-Sfard's acquisition and participation metaphors-which leads to the assertion that competence is both an individual characteristic and a quality that emerges from a purposeful social interaction between individuals and their context. This theory recognizes that the deliberate use of context could be used to approach learning as acquiring collective competence.Based on this relationship between learner, context, and competence, the authors propose an approach to CBTVT that recognizes that all learners will have to meet a number of standard preset learning targets in their workplace, while still having room for further context-specific competence development and personal growth within strategically organized learning environments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S22-S26
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume93
Issue number3S
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2018

Cite this

Teunissen, Pim W ; Kogan, Jennifer R ; Ten Cate, Olle ; Gruppen, Larry D ; Lingard, Lorelei A. / Learning in Practice : A Valuation of Context in Time-Variable Medical Training. In: Academic Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 93, No. 3S. pp. S22-S26.
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abstract = "The logical consequence of implementing competency-based education is moving to time-variable training. Competency-based, time-variable training (CBTVT) requires an understanding of how learners interact with their learning context and how that leads to competence. In this article, the authors discuss this relationship. They first explain that the time required to achieve competence in clinical practice depends on the availability of clinical experiences that are conducive to ongoing competence development. This requires both curricular flexibility in light of the differences in individual learners' development and a balance between longitudinal placements and transitions to different environments.Along with the deliberate use of the opportunities that learning environments offer, there is value for learners in spending ample time-in-context. For instance, guided independence is possible when trainees do not progress immediately after meeting curricular learning objectives. Next, the potential implications of CBTVT can be illustrated by two learning perspectives-Sfard's acquisition and participation metaphors-which leads to the assertion that competence is both an individual characteristic and a quality that emerges from a purposeful social interaction between individuals and their context. This theory recognizes that the deliberate use of context could be used to approach learning as acquiring collective competence.Based on this relationship between learner, context, and competence, the authors propose an approach to CBTVT that recognizes that all learners will have to meet a number of standard preset learning targets in their workplace, while still having room for further context-specific competence development and personal growth within strategically organized learning environments.",
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Learning in Practice : A Valuation of Context in Time-Variable Medical Training. / Teunissen, Pim W; Kogan, Jennifer R; Ten Cate, Olle; Gruppen, Larry D; Lingard, Lorelei A.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 93, No. 3S, 03.2018, p. S22-S26.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractAcademic

TY - JOUR

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T2 - A Valuation of Context in Time-Variable Medical Training

AU - Teunissen, Pim W

AU - Kogan, Jennifer R

AU - Ten Cate, Olle

AU - Gruppen, Larry D

AU - Lingard, Lorelei A

PY - 2018/3

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N2 - The logical consequence of implementing competency-based education is moving to time-variable training. Competency-based, time-variable training (CBTVT) requires an understanding of how learners interact with their learning context and how that leads to competence. In this article, the authors discuss this relationship. They first explain that the time required to achieve competence in clinical practice depends on the availability of clinical experiences that are conducive to ongoing competence development. This requires both curricular flexibility in light of the differences in individual learners' development and a balance between longitudinal placements and transitions to different environments.Along with the deliberate use of the opportunities that learning environments offer, there is value for learners in spending ample time-in-context. For instance, guided independence is possible when trainees do not progress immediately after meeting curricular learning objectives. Next, the potential implications of CBTVT can be illustrated by two learning perspectives-Sfard's acquisition and participation metaphors-which leads to the assertion that competence is both an individual characteristic and a quality that emerges from a purposeful social interaction between individuals and their context. This theory recognizes that the deliberate use of context could be used to approach learning as acquiring collective competence.Based on this relationship between learner, context, and competence, the authors propose an approach to CBTVT that recognizes that all learners will have to meet a number of standard preset learning targets in their workplace, while still having room for further context-specific competence development and personal growth within strategically organized learning environments.

AB - The logical consequence of implementing competency-based education is moving to time-variable training. Competency-based, time-variable training (CBTVT) requires an understanding of how learners interact with their learning context and how that leads to competence. In this article, the authors discuss this relationship. They first explain that the time required to achieve competence in clinical practice depends on the availability of clinical experiences that are conducive to ongoing competence development. This requires both curricular flexibility in light of the differences in individual learners' development and a balance between longitudinal placements and transitions to different environments.Along with the deliberate use of the opportunities that learning environments offer, there is value for learners in spending ample time-in-context. For instance, guided independence is possible when trainees do not progress immediately after meeting curricular learning objectives. Next, the potential implications of CBTVT can be illustrated by two learning perspectives-Sfard's acquisition and participation metaphors-which leads to the assertion that competence is both an individual characteristic and a quality that emerges from a purposeful social interaction between individuals and their context. This theory recognizes that the deliberate use of context could be used to approach learning as acquiring collective competence.Based on this relationship between learner, context, and competence, the authors propose an approach to CBTVT that recognizes that all learners will have to meet a number of standard preset learning targets in their workplace, while still having room for further context-specific competence development and personal growth within strategically organized learning environments.

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