Metacognitive training in patients recovering from a first psychosis: an experience sampling study testing treatment effects

Karin Pos, Carin J. Meijer, Oukje Verkerk, Onno Ackema, Lydia Krabbendam, Lieuwe de Haan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Cognitive biases, negative affect and negative self-esteem are associated with paranoia in people with psychotic disorders. Metacognitive group training (MCT) aims to target these biases although research has shown mixed results. Our objective was to establish the effect of MCT on paranoid ideation in patients with recent onset psychosis in a powerful experience sampling design. 50 patients between the age of 18 and 35 were included in a single-blind, parallel group RCT comparing MCT with occupational therapy (OT) as an active control condition. We assessed via questionnaires and experience sampling treatment effects on paranoid ideation, delusional conviction, the cognitive bias jumping to conclusion (JTC), and cognitive insight, as well as treatment effects on associations between negative affect, negative self-esteem and paranoid ideation. Patients in the MCT group did not show a decrease in paranoid ideation, delusional conviction, JTC-bias or an increase in cognitive insight compared with OT. However, negative affect showed a weaker association with paranoid ideation post-treatment in the MCT condition. In the OT condition, this association was stronger post-treatment. We tentatively suggest that patients with an early psychosis seemed to benefit from MCT in emotional learning compared with the OT condition. Despite the fact that the group training is well-received by patients, subsequent individual MCT (MCT+) may be indicated for stronger favorable effects on paranoid ideation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57-64
JournalEuropean Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience
Volume268
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Externally publishedYes

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