Minimally Invasive Versus Open Total Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Short-Term Outcomes and Completeness of Resection : Surgical Techniques in Gastric Cancer

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Abstract

Minimally invasive surgical techniques for gastric cancer are gaining more acceptance worldwide as an alternative to open resection. In order to assess the role of minimally invasive and open techniques in total gastrectomy for cancer, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. Articles comparing minimally invasive versus open total gastrectomy were reviewed, collected from the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases. Two different authors (JS and NW) independently selected and assessed the articles. Outcomes regarding operative results, postoperative recovery, morbidity, mortality, and oncological outcomes were analyzed. Statistical analysis portrayed the weighted mean difference (WMD) with a 95% confidence interval and odds ratio (OR). Out of 1242 papers, 12 studies were selected, including a total of 1360 patients, of which 592 underwent minimally invasive total gastrectomy (MITG). Compared to open total gastrectomy (OTG), MITG showed a longer operation time (WMD: 48.06 min, P < 0.00001), less operative blood loss (WMD: -160.70 mL, P < 0.00001), faster postoperative recovery, measured as shorter time to first flatus (WMD -1.05 days, P < 0.00001), shorter length of hospital stay (WMD: -2.43 days, P = 0.0002), less postoperative complications (OR 0.66, P = 0.02), similar mortality rates (OR 0.60, P = 0.52), and similar rates in lymph node yield (WMD -2.30, P = 0.06). Minimally invasive total gastrectomy showed faster postoperative recovery and less postoperative complications, whereas completeness of the resection was similar in both groups. Duration of surgery was longer in the minimally invasive group. Only comparative non-randomized studies were available, further emphasizing the need for a prospective randomized trial comparing MITG and OTG.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)148-57
Number of pages10
JournalWorld Journal of Surgery
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2016

Cite this

@article{ab3c99a5731d41c3b9696269a3b805ed,
title = "Minimally Invasive Versus Open Total Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Short-Term Outcomes and Completeness of Resection : Surgical Techniques in Gastric Cancer",
abstract = "Minimally invasive surgical techniques for gastric cancer are gaining more acceptance worldwide as an alternative to open resection. In order to assess the role of minimally invasive and open techniques in total gastrectomy for cancer, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. Articles comparing minimally invasive versus open total gastrectomy were reviewed, collected from the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases. Two different authors (JS and NW) independently selected and assessed the articles. Outcomes regarding operative results, postoperative recovery, morbidity, mortality, and oncological outcomes were analyzed. Statistical analysis portrayed the weighted mean difference (WMD) with a 95{\%} confidence interval and odds ratio (OR). Out of 1242 papers, 12 studies were selected, including a total of 1360 patients, of which 592 underwent minimally invasive total gastrectomy (MITG). Compared to open total gastrectomy (OTG), MITG showed a longer operation time (WMD: 48.06 min, P < 0.00001), less operative blood loss (WMD: -160.70 mL, P < 0.00001), faster postoperative recovery, measured as shorter time to first flatus (WMD -1.05 days, P < 0.00001), shorter length of hospital stay (WMD: -2.43 days, P = 0.0002), less postoperative complications (OR 0.66, P = 0.02), similar mortality rates (OR 0.60, P = 0.52), and similar rates in lymph node yield (WMD -2.30, P = 0.06). Minimally invasive total gastrectomy showed faster postoperative recovery and less postoperative complications, whereas completeness of the resection was similar in both groups. Duration of surgery was longer in the minimally invasive group. Only comparative non-randomized studies were available, further emphasizing the need for a prospective randomized trial comparing MITG and OTG.",
keywords = "Follow-Up Studies, Gastrectomy, Global Health, Humans, Incidence, Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures, Odds Ratio, Operative Time, Postoperative Complications, Stomach Neoplasms, Time Factors, Journal Article, Meta-Analysis, Review",
author = "Jennifer Straatman and {van der Wielen}, Nicole and Cuesta, {Miguel A} and {de Lange-de Klerk}, ESM and Jansma, {Elise P} and {van der Peet}, {Donald L}",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00268-015-3223-1",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "148--57",
journal = "World Journal of Surgery",
issn = "0364-2313",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Minimally Invasive Versus Open Total Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer

T2 - A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Short-Term Outcomes and Completeness of Resection : Surgical Techniques in Gastric Cancer

AU - Straatman, Jennifer

AU - van der Wielen, Nicole

AU - Cuesta, Miguel A

AU - de Lange-de Klerk, ESM

AU - Jansma, Elise P

AU - van der Peet, Donald L

PY - 2016/1

Y1 - 2016/1

N2 - Minimally invasive surgical techniques for gastric cancer are gaining more acceptance worldwide as an alternative to open resection. In order to assess the role of minimally invasive and open techniques in total gastrectomy for cancer, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. Articles comparing minimally invasive versus open total gastrectomy were reviewed, collected from the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases. Two different authors (JS and NW) independently selected and assessed the articles. Outcomes regarding operative results, postoperative recovery, morbidity, mortality, and oncological outcomes were analyzed. Statistical analysis portrayed the weighted mean difference (WMD) with a 95% confidence interval and odds ratio (OR). Out of 1242 papers, 12 studies were selected, including a total of 1360 patients, of which 592 underwent minimally invasive total gastrectomy (MITG). Compared to open total gastrectomy (OTG), MITG showed a longer operation time (WMD: 48.06 min, P < 0.00001), less operative blood loss (WMD: -160.70 mL, P < 0.00001), faster postoperative recovery, measured as shorter time to first flatus (WMD -1.05 days, P < 0.00001), shorter length of hospital stay (WMD: -2.43 days, P = 0.0002), less postoperative complications (OR 0.66, P = 0.02), similar mortality rates (OR 0.60, P = 0.52), and similar rates in lymph node yield (WMD -2.30, P = 0.06). Minimally invasive total gastrectomy showed faster postoperative recovery and less postoperative complications, whereas completeness of the resection was similar in both groups. Duration of surgery was longer in the minimally invasive group. Only comparative non-randomized studies were available, further emphasizing the need for a prospective randomized trial comparing MITG and OTG.

AB - Minimally invasive surgical techniques for gastric cancer are gaining more acceptance worldwide as an alternative to open resection. In order to assess the role of minimally invasive and open techniques in total gastrectomy for cancer, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. Articles comparing minimally invasive versus open total gastrectomy were reviewed, collected from the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases. Two different authors (JS and NW) independently selected and assessed the articles. Outcomes regarding operative results, postoperative recovery, morbidity, mortality, and oncological outcomes were analyzed. Statistical analysis portrayed the weighted mean difference (WMD) with a 95% confidence interval and odds ratio (OR). Out of 1242 papers, 12 studies were selected, including a total of 1360 patients, of which 592 underwent minimally invasive total gastrectomy (MITG). Compared to open total gastrectomy (OTG), MITG showed a longer operation time (WMD: 48.06 min, P < 0.00001), less operative blood loss (WMD: -160.70 mL, P < 0.00001), faster postoperative recovery, measured as shorter time to first flatus (WMD -1.05 days, P < 0.00001), shorter length of hospital stay (WMD: -2.43 days, P = 0.0002), less postoperative complications (OR 0.66, P = 0.02), similar mortality rates (OR 0.60, P = 0.52), and similar rates in lymph node yield (WMD -2.30, P = 0.06). Minimally invasive total gastrectomy showed faster postoperative recovery and less postoperative complications, whereas completeness of the resection was similar in both groups. Duration of surgery was longer in the minimally invasive group. Only comparative non-randomized studies were available, further emphasizing the need for a prospective randomized trial comparing MITG and OTG.

KW - Follow-Up Studies

KW - Gastrectomy

KW - Global Health

KW - Humans

KW - Incidence

KW - Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures

KW - Odds Ratio

KW - Operative Time

KW - Postoperative Complications

KW - Stomach Neoplasms

KW - Time Factors

KW - Journal Article

KW - Meta-Analysis

KW - Review

U2 - 10.1007/s00268-015-3223-1

DO - 10.1007/s00268-015-3223-1

M3 - Article

VL - 40

SP - 148

EP - 157

JO - World Journal of Surgery

JF - World Journal of Surgery

SN - 0364-2313

IS - 1

ER -