Monitoring of the respiratory muscles in the critically Ill

Jonne Doorduin, Hieronymus W H Van Hees, Johannes G. Van Der Hoeven, Leo M A Heunks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Evidence has accumulated that respiratory muscle dysfunction develops incritically ill patients and contributes to prolonged weaning from mechanical ventilation. Accordingly, it seems highly appropriate to monitor the respiratory muscles in these patients. Today, we are only at the beginning of routinely monitoring respiratory muscle function. Indeed, most clinicians do not evaluate respiratory muscle function in critically ill patients at all. In our opinion, however, practical issues and the absence of sound scientific data for clinical benefit should not discourage clinicians from having a closer look at respiratory muscle function in critically ill patients. This perspective discusses the latest developments in the field of respiratory muscle monitoring and possible implications of monitoring respiratory muscle function in critically ill patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)20-27
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume187
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2013

Cite this

Doorduin, Jonne ; Van Hees, Hieronymus W H ; Van Der Hoeven, Johannes G. ; Heunks, Leo M A. / Monitoring of the respiratory muscles in the critically Ill. In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 187, No. 1. pp. 20-27.
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Monitoring of the respiratory muscles in the critically Ill. / Doorduin, Jonne; Van Hees, Hieronymus W H; Van Der Hoeven, Johannes G.; Heunks, Leo M A.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 187, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 20-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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