Motivational profiles and motivation for lifelong learning of medical specialists

Stéphanie M. E. van der Burgt, Rashmi A. Kusurkar, Janneke A. Wilschut, Sharon L. N. M. Tjinatsoi, Gerda Croiset, Saskia M. Peerdeman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Medical specialists face the challenge of maintaining their knowledge and skills and continuing professional development, that is, lifelong learning. Motivation may play an integral role in many of the challenges facing the physician workforce today including maintenance of a high performance. The aim of this study was to determine whether medical specialists show different motivational profiles and if these profiles predict differences in motivation for lifelong learning. Methods: An online questionnaire was sent to every medical specialist working in five hospitals in the Netherlands. The questionnaire included the validated Multidimensional Work Motivation Scale and the Jefferson Scale of Physician Lifelong Learning together with background questions like age, gender, and type of hospital. Respondents were grouped into different motivational profiles by using a two-step clustering approach. Results: Four motivational profiles were identified: (1) HAMC profile (for High Autonomous and Moderate Controlled motivation), (2) MAMC profile (for Moderate Autonomous and Moderate Controlled motivation), (3) MALC profile (for Moderate Autonomous and Low Controlled motivation), and (4) HALC profile (for High Autonomous and Low Controlled motivation). Most of the female specialists that work in an academic hospital and specialists with a surgical specialty were represented in the HALC profile. Discussion: Four motivational profiles were found among medical specialists, differing in gender, experience and type of specialization. The profiles are based on the combination of autonomous motivation (AM) and controlled motivation (CM) in the specialists. The profiles that have a high score on autonomous motivation have a positive association with lifelong learning.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)171-178
JournalJOURNAL OF CONTINUING EDUCATION IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS
Volume38
Issue number3
Early online date22 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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