Neck/shoulder, low back, and arm pain in relation to computer use, physical activity, stress, and depression among dutch adolescents

A. C.M. Diepenmaat*, M. F. Van Der Wal, H. C.W. De Vet, R. A. Hirasing

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. To examine among adolescents (1) the prevalence of neck/shoulder, low back, and arm pain within different sociodemographic groups and (2) the association of neck/shoulder, low back, and arm pain with computer use, physical activity, depression, and stress. METHODS. A school-based questionnaire survey in 2002 and 2003 of neck/shoulder, low back, and arm pain, computer use, physical activity, depression, and stress. The survey was given to 3485 adolescents aged 12 to 16 years who attended secondary schools in Amsterdam, Netherlands. RESULTS. The overall prevalence of neck/shoulder, low back, and arm pain was 11.5%, 7.5%, and 3.9%, respectively. The prevalence of neck/shoulder pain was higher among girls and adolescents not living with both parents. The prevalence of low back pain also was higher among girls. Depressive symptoms were associated with neck/shoulder pain, low back pain, and arm pain. The stress experienced was associated with neck/shoulder pain and with low back pain. CONCLUSIONS. This study strengthens the findings that musculoskeletal pain is common among adolescents and is associated with depression and stress but not with computer use and physical activity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)412-416
Number of pages5
JournalPediatrics
Volume117
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2006

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