One-year effects of two intensive inpatient treatments for severely obese children and adolescents: Bmc Pediatrics

S. Makkes, C. M. Renders, Judith E. Bosmans, O.H. van der Baan-Slootweg, T. Hoekstra, J. C. Seidell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Intensive inpatient lifestyle treatment may be a suitable alternative for severely obese children and adolescents who do not benefit from ambulatory obesity treatment. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of two intensive one-year lifestyle treatments with varying inpatient periods for severely obese children and adolescents with regard to SDS-BMI and cardiometabolic risk factors. Methods: The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial with two active treatment groups. Eighty participants (8-19 years) with severe obesity received treatment at a specialized childhood obesity center in the Netherlands. Severe obesity was defined as a SDS-BMI >= 3.0 or a SDS-BMI >= 2.3 in combination with obesity-related comorbidity. Participants received an intensive one-year lifestyle treatment with an inpatient period of either two months and biweekly return visits during the next four months (short-stay group) or six months (long-stay group), both followed by six monthly return visits. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, six and 12 months and included SDS-BMI as primary outcome and cardiometabolic risk factors such as SDS-waist circumference, systolic-and diastolic blood pressure, and blood measurements as secondary outcomes. To evaluate differences in the course of the primary-and secondary outcomes over time between the two treatment groups, Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) were performed. Results: No differences in the course of SDS-BMI or secondary outcomes over time were found between the two treatment groups after one year of treatment. SDS-BMI decreased statistically significantly after one year of treatment compared with baseline in both groups (0.33 (0.48) in the short-stay and 0.52 (0.49) in the long-stay group). Similar results were found for SDS-waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure and HDL-cholesterol. Conclusions: Since there were no significant differences in effects between the short-and long-stay treatment and considering the burden of the long-stay treatment for children and families, we recommend implementation of the short-stay treatment.
Original languageEnglish
Article number120
JournalBMC Pediatrics
Volume16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Cite this

Makkes, S. ; Renders, C. M. ; Bosmans, Judith E. ; van der Baan-Slootweg, O.H. ; Hoekstra, T. ; Seidell, J. C. / One-year effects of two intensive inpatient treatments for severely obese children and adolescents : Bmc Pediatrics. In: BMC Pediatrics. 2016 ; Vol. 16.
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title = "One-year effects of two intensive inpatient treatments for severely obese children and adolescents: Bmc Pediatrics",
abstract = "Background: Intensive inpatient lifestyle treatment may be a suitable alternative for severely obese children and adolescents who do not benefit from ambulatory obesity treatment. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of two intensive one-year lifestyle treatments with varying inpatient periods for severely obese children and adolescents with regard to SDS-BMI and cardiometabolic risk factors. Methods: The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial with two active treatment groups. Eighty participants (8-19 years) with severe obesity received treatment at a specialized childhood obesity center in the Netherlands. Severe obesity was defined as a SDS-BMI >= 3.0 or a SDS-BMI >= 2.3 in combination with obesity-related comorbidity. Participants received an intensive one-year lifestyle treatment with an inpatient period of either two months and biweekly return visits during the next four months (short-stay group) or six months (long-stay group), both followed by six monthly return visits. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, six and 12 months and included SDS-BMI as primary outcome and cardiometabolic risk factors such as SDS-waist circumference, systolic-and diastolic blood pressure, and blood measurements as secondary outcomes. To evaluate differences in the course of the primary-and secondary outcomes over time between the two treatment groups, Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) were performed. Results: No differences in the course of SDS-BMI or secondary outcomes over time were found between the two treatment groups after one year of treatment. SDS-BMI decreased statistically significantly after one year of treatment compared with baseline in both groups (0.33 (0.48) in the short-stay and 0.52 (0.49) in the long-stay group). Similar results were found for SDS-waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure and HDL-cholesterol. Conclusions: Since there were no significant differences in effects between the short-and long-stay treatment and considering the burden of the long-stay treatment for children and families, we recommend implementation of the short-stay treatment.",
author = "S. Makkes and Renders, {C. M.} and Bosmans, {Judith E.} and {van der Baan-Slootweg}, O.H. and T. Hoekstra and Seidell, {J. C.}",
note = "ISI Document Delivery No.: DT0AA Times Cited: 0 Cited Reference Count: 48 Makkes, Sabine Renders, Carry M. Bosmans, Judith E. van der Baan-Slootweg, Olga H. Hoekstra, Trynke Seidell, Jacob C. Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw) The study is funded by The Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw). The funder had no role in design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; and preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication. 0 2 BIOMED CENTRAL LTD LONDON BMC PEDIATR",
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One-year effects of two intensive inpatient treatments for severely obese children and adolescents : Bmc Pediatrics. / Makkes, S.; Renders, C. M.; Bosmans, Judith E.; van der Baan-Slootweg, O.H.; Hoekstra, T.; Seidell, J. C.

In: BMC Pediatrics, Vol. 16, 120, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - One-year effects of two intensive inpatient treatments for severely obese children and adolescents

T2 - Bmc Pediatrics

AU - Makkes, S.

AU - Renders, C. M.

AU - Bosmans, Judith E.

AU - van der Baan-Slootweg, O.H.

AU - Hoekstra, T.

AU - Seidell, J. C.

N1 - ISI Document Delivery No.: DT0AA Times Cited: 0 Cited Reference Count: 48 Makkes, Sabine Renders, Carry M. Bosmans, Judith E. van der Baan-Slootweg, Olga H. Hoekstra, Trynke Seidell, Jacob C. Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw) The study is funded by The Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw). The funder had no role in design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; and preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication. 0 2 BIOMED CENTRAL LTD LONDON BMC PEDIATR

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Background: Intensive inpatient lifestyle treatment may be a suitable alternative for severely obese children and adolescents who do not benefit from ambulatory obesity treatment. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of two intensive one-year lifestyle treatments with varying inpatient periods for severely obese children and adolescents with regard to SDS-BMI and cardiometabolic risk factors. Methods: The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial with two active treatment groups. Eighty participants (8-19 years) with severe obesity received treatment at a specialized childhood obesity center in the Netherlands. Severe obesity was defined as a SDS-BMI >= 3.0 or a SDS-BMI >= 2.3 in combination with obesity-related comorbidity. Participants received an intensive one-year lifestyle treatment with an inpatient period of either two months and biweekly return visits during the next four months (short-stay group) or six months (long-stay group), both followed by six monthly return visits. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, six and 12 months and included SDS-BMI as primary outcome and cardiometabolic risk factors such as SDS-waist circumference, systolic-and diastolic blood pressure, and blood measurements as secondary outcomes. To evaluate differences in the course of the primary-and secondary outcomes over time between the two treatment groups, Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) were performed. Results: No differences in the course of SDS-BMI or secondary outcomes over time were found between the two treatment groups after one year of treatment. SDS-BMI decreased statistically significantly after one year of treatment compared with baseline in both groups (0.33 (0.48) in the short-stay and 0.52 (0.49) in the long-stay group). Similar results were found for SDS-waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure and HDL-cholesterol. Conclusions: Since there were no significant differences in effects between the short-and long-stay treatment and considering the burden of the long-stay treatment for children and families, we recommend implementation of the short-stay treatment.

AB - Background: Intensive inpatient lifestyle treatment may be a suitable alternative for severely obese children and adolescents who do not benefit from ambulatory obesity treatment. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of two intensive one-year lifestyle treatments with varying inpatient periods for severely obese children and adolescents with regard to SDS-BMI and cardiometabolic risk factors. Methods: The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial with two active treatment groups. Eighty participants (8-19 years) with severe obesity received treatment at a specialized childhood obesity center in the Netherlands. Severe obesity was defined as a SDS-BMI >= 3.0 or a SDS-BMI >= 2.3 in combination with obesity-related comorbidity. Participants received an intensive one-year lifestyle treatment with an inpatient period of either two months and biweekly return visits during the next four months (short-stay group) or six months (long-stay group), both followed by six monthly return visits. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, six and 12 months and included SDS-BMI as primary outcome and cardiometabolic risk factors such as SDS-waist circumference, systolic-and diastolic blood pressure, and blood measurements as secondary outcomes. To evaluate differences in the course of the primary-and secondary outcomes over time between the two treatment groups, Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) were performed. Results: No differences in the course of SDS-BMI or secondary outcomes over time were found between the two treatment groups after one year of treatment. SDS-BMI decreased statistically significantly after one year of treatment compared with baseline in both groups (0.33 (0.48) in the short-stay and 0.52 (0.49) in the long-stay group). Similar results were found for SDS-waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure and HDL-cholesterol. Conclusions: Since there were no significant differences in effects between the short-and long-stay treatment and considering the burden of the long-stay treatment for children and families, we recommend implementation of the short-stay treatment.

U2 - 10.1186/s12887-016-0659-x

DO - 10.1186/s12887-016-0659-x

M3 - Article

VL - 16

JO - BMC Pediatrics

JF - BMC Pediatrics

SN - 1471-2431

M1 - 120

ER -