Optimal nutrition in lactating women and its effect on later health of offspring: A systematic review of current evidence and recommendations (EarlyNutrition project)

Marita de Waard, Brigitte Brands, Stefanie M.P. Kouwenhoven, Joaquim Calvo Lerma, Paula Crespo-Escobar, Berthold Koletzko, Bartlomiej M. Zalewski, Johannes B. van Goudoever

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: EarlyNutrition (www.project-earlynutrition.eu) is an international research consortium investigating the effects of early nutrition on metabolic programming. Objective: To summarize current evidence and standards, recommendations, guidelines, and regulations on nutrition or supplements in lactating women with emphasis placed on long-term health effects in offspring, including cardiovascular disease, hypertension, overweight/obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, or glucose intolerance. Methods: Medline, Embase, selected databases and websites were searched for documents published between 2010 and 2015. Results: Thirteen documents met the inclusion criteria. Effects of maternal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) supplementation on overweight/obesity or hypertension in offspring were assessed in 10 studies. One study described the effect of maternal vitamin D supplementation on overweight/obesity, and the remaining 2 studies assessed the effects of maternal probiotic/synbiotic supplementation during lactation on overweight/obesity or metabolic syndrome in their infants. Forty-one documents contained dietary recommendations on various macro- and micronutrients for lactating women, but without consideration of our long-term health outcomes in infants. Conclusion: Literature on nutrition of lactating women and its effect on their infants' later health with respect to metabolic programming outcomes appeared to be scarce, and focused mostly on supplementation of LC-PUFA's. No recent guidelines or recommendations were available, highlighting the significant research gaps regarding this topic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4003-4016
Number of pages14
JournalCrit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr.
Volume57
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Dec 2017

Cite this

@article{f34126f2e89d45c2a57a0b4ee88a3cd5,
title = "Optimal nutrition in lactating women and its effect on later health of offspring: A systematic review of current evidence and recommendations (EarlyNutrition project)",
abstract = "Background: EarlyNutrition (www.project-earlynutrition.eu) is an international research consortium investigating the effects of early nutrition on metabolic programming. Objective: To summarize current evidence and standards, recommendations, guidelines, and regulations on nutrition or supplements in lactating women with emphasis placed on long-term health effects in offspring, including cardiovascular disease, hypertension, overweight/obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, or glucose intolerance. Methods: Medline, Embase, selected databases and websites were searched for documents published between 2010 and 2015. Results: Thirteen documents met the inclusion criteria. Effects of maternal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) supplementation on overweight/obesity or hypertension in offspring were assessed in 10 studies. One study described the effect of maternal vitamin D supplementation on overweight/obesity, and the remaining 2 studies assessed the effects of maternal probiotic/synbiotic supplementation during lactation on overweight/obesity or metabolic syndrome in their infants. Forty-one documents contained dietary recommendations on various macro- and micronutrients for lactating women, but without consideration of our long-term health outcomes in infants. Conclusion: Literature on nutrition of lactating women and its effect on their infants' later health with respect to metabolic programming outcomes appeared to be scarce, and focused mostly on supplementation of LC-PUFA's. No recent guidelines or recommendations were available, highlighting the significant research gaps regarding this topic.",
keywords = "Infant, LC-PUFA, metabolic programming, probiotics, Vitamin D",
author = "{de Waard}, Marita and Brigitte Brands and Kouwenhoven, {Stefanie M.P.} and Lerma, {Joaquim Calvo} and Paula Crespo-Escobar and Berthold Koletzko and Zalewski, {Bartlomiej M.} and {van Goudoever}, {Johannes B.}",
year = "2017",
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pages = "4003--4016",
journal = "Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr.",
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Optimal nutrition in lactating women and its effect on later health of offspring : A systematic review of current evidence and recommendations (EarlyNutrition project). / de Waard, Marita; Brands, Brigitte; Kouwenhoven, Stefanie M.P.; Lerma, Joaquim Calvo; Crespo-Escobar, Paula; Koletzko, Berthold; Zalewski, Bartlomiej M.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

In: Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr., Vol. 57, No. 18, 12.12.2017, p. 4003-4016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Optimal nutrition in lactating women and its effect on later health of offspring

T2 - A systematic review of current evidence and recommendations (EarlyNutrition project)

AU - de Waard, Marita

AU - Brands, Brigitte

AU - Kouwenhoven, Stefanie M.P.

AU - Lerma, Joaquim Calvo

AU - Crespo-Escobar, Paula

AU - Koletzko, Berthold

AU - Zalewski, Bartlomiej M.

AU - van Goudoever, Johannes B.

PY - 2017/12/12

Y1 - 2017/12/12

N2 - Background: EarlyNutrition (www.project-earlynutrition.eu) is an international research consortium investigating the effects of early nutrition on metabolic programming. Objective: To summarize current evidence and standards, recommendations, guidelines, and regulations on nutrition or supplements in lactating women with emphasis placed on long-term health effects in offspring, including cardiovascular disease, hypertension, overweight/obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, or glucose intolerance. Methods: Medline, Embase, selected databases and websites were searched for documents published between 2010 and 2015. Results: Thirteen documents met the inclusion criteria. Effects of maternal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) supplementation on overweight/obesity or hypertension in offspring were assessed in 10 studies. One study described the effect of maternal vitamin D supplementation on overweight/obesity, and the remaining 2 studies assessed the effects of maternal probiotic/synbiotic supplementation during lactation on overweight/obesity or metabolic syndrome in their infants. Forty-one documents contained dietary recommendations on various macro- and micronutrients for lactating women, but without consideration of our long-term health outcomes in infants. Conclusion: Literature on nutrition of lactating women and its effect on their infants' later health with respect to metabolic programming outcomes appeared to be scarce, and focused mostly on supplementation of LC-PUFA's. No recent guidelines or recommendations were available, highlighting the significant research gaps regarding this topic.

AB - Background: EarlyNutrition (www.project-earlynutrition.eu) is an international research consortium investigating the effects of early nutrition on metabolic programming. Objective: To summarize current evidence and standards, recommendations, guidelines, and regulations on nutrition or supplements in lactating women with emphasis placed on long-term health effects in offspring, including cardiovascular disease, hypertension, overweight/obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, or glucose intolerance. Methods: Medline, Embase, selected databases and websites were searched for documents published between 2010 and 2015. Results: Thirteen documents met the inclusion criteria. Effects of maternal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) supplementation on overweight/obesity or hypertension in offspring were assessed in 10 studies. One study described the effect of maternal vitamin D supplementation on overweight/obesity, and the remaining 2 studies assessed the effects of maternal probiotic/synbiotic supplementation during lactation on overweight/obesity or metabolic syndrome in their infants. Forty-one documents contained dietary recommendations on various macro- and micronutrients for lactating women, but without consideration of our long-term health outcomes in infants. Conclusion: Literature on nutrition of lactating women and its effect on their infants' later health with respect to metabolic programming outcomes appeared to be scarce, and focused mostly on supplementation of LC-PUFA's. No recent guidelines or recommendations were available, highlighting the significant research gaps regarding this topic.

KW - Infant

KW - LC-PUFA

KW - metabolic programming

KW - probiotics

KW - Vitamin D

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DO - 10.1080/10408398.2016.1158149

M3 - Article

VL - 57

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EP - 4016

JO - Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr.

JF - Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr.

SN - 1040-8398

IS - 18

ER -