Painful swelling after a noxious event and the development of complex regional pain syndrome 1: A one-year prospective study

F. Brunner, L. M. Bachmann, R. S.G.M. Perez, J. Marinus, M. M. Wertli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: The timing of diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) 1 remains a challenge due to the large heterogeneity of clinical presentations. We describe the distribution and differences in outcomes and clinical manifestations between time points and patient groups with and without CRPS 1 following an initiating event. Methods: Prospective cohort study with a consecutive registration of patients presenting with painful swelling of the affected extremity after an initiating event and follow-up visits after 3, 6 and 12 months. Results: Forty-two patients were enrolled (37 females, mean age 55.1 years). At baseline, 35 participants (83%, females n = 30) fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for CRPS 1. At 3 months, 19 out of the initial 35 CRPS 1 patients (54%) did not meet the diagnostic criteria anymore. Besides our inclusion criteria of a painful swelling, early manifestations indicating a CRPS 1 primarily include an impaired quality of life (SF-35, EQ5-D), more pain (NRS, MPQ) and restricted range of motion. Conclusions: CRPS 1 develops within 8 weeks following a noxious event. Although many CRPS 1 patients reach partial remission within the first 3 months, signs and symptoms do not improve significantly at 1 year. In order to identify prognostic risk factors large prospective cohort studies are needed. Significance: This prospective cohort study follows patients with complaints most suspected for complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) 1. CRPS 1 develops within 8 weeks following a noxious event. Although many CRPS 1 patients reach partial remission within the 3 months, symptoms do not improve significantly at 1 year.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1611-1617
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Pain (United Kingdom)
Volume21
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2017

Cite this

@article{128428c642324880a7ff1940dd21537d,
title = "Painful swelling after a noxious event and the development of complex regional pain syndrome 1: A one-year prospective study",
abstract = "Background: The timing of diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) 1 remains a challenge due to the large heterogeneity of clinical presentations. We describe the distribution and differences in outcomes and clinical manifestations between time points and patient groups with and without CRPS 1 following an initiating event. Methods: Prospective cohort study with a consecutive registration of patients presenting with painful swelling of the affected extremity after an initiating event and follow-up visits after 3, 6 and 12 months. Results: Forty-two patients were enrolled (37 females, mean age 55.1 years). At baseline, 35 participants (83{\%}, females n = 30) fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for CRPS 1. At 3 months, 19 out of the initial 35 CRPS 1 patients (54{\%}) did not meet the diagnostic criteria anymore. Besides our inclusion criteria of a painful swelling, early manifestations indicating a CRPS 1 primarily include an impaired quality of life (SF-35, EQ5-D), more pain (NRS, MPQ) and restricted range of motion. Conclusions: CRPS 1 develops within 8 weeks following a noxious event. Although many CRPS 1 patients reach partial remission within the first 3 months, signs and symptoms do not improve significantly at 1 year. In order to identify prognostic risk factors large prospective cohort studies are needed. Significance: This prospective cohort study follows patients with complaints most suspected for complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) 1. CRPS 1 develops within 8 weeks following a noxious event. Although many CRPS 1 patients reach partial remission within the 3 months, symptoms do not improve significantly at 1 year.",
author = "F. Brunner and Bachmann, {L. M.} and Perez, {R. S.G.M.} and J. Marinus and Wertli, {M. M.}",
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Painful swelling after a noxious event and the development of complex regional pain syndrome 1 : A one-year prospective study. / Brunner, F.; Bachmann, L. M.; Perez, R. S.G.M.; Marinus, J.; Wertli, M. M.

In: European Journal of Pain (United Kingdom), Vol. 21, No. 9, 01.10.2017, p. 1611-1617.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Painful swelling after a noxious event and the development of complex regional pain syndrome 1

T2 - A one-year prospective study

AU - Brunner, F.

AU - Bachmann, L. M.

AU - Perez, R. S.G.M.

AU - Marinus, J.

AU - Wertli, M. M.

PY - 2017/10/1

Y1 - 2017/10/1

N2 - Background: The timing of diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) 1 remains a challenge due to the large heterogeneity of clinical presentations. We describe the distribution and differences in outcomes and clinical manifestations between time points and patient groups with and without CRPS 1 following an initiating event. Methods: Prospective cohort study with a consecutive registration of patients presenting with painful swelling of the affected extremity after an initiating event and follow-up visits after 3, 6 and 12 months. Results: Forty-two patients were enrolled (37 females, mean age 55.1 years). At baseline, 35 participants (83%, females n = 30) fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for CRPS 1. At 3 months, 19 out of the initial 35 CRPS 1 patients (54%) did not meet the diagnostic criteria anymore. Besides our inclusion criteria of a painful swelling, early manifestations indicating a CRPS 1 primarily include an impaired quality of life (SF-35, EQ5-D), more pain (NRS, MPQ) and restricted range of motion. Conclusions: CRPS 1 develops within 8 weeks following a noxious event. Although many CRPS 1 patients reach partial remission within the first 3 months, signs and symptoms do not improve significantly at 1 year. In order to identify prognostic risk factors large prospective cohort studies are needed. Significance: This prospective cohort study follows patients with complaints most suspected for complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) 1. CRPS 1 develops within 8 weeks following a noxious event. Although many CRPS 1 patients reach partial remission within the 3 months, symptoms do not improve significantly at 1 year.

AB - Background: The timing of diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) 1 remains a challenge due to the large heterogeneity of clinical presentations. We describe the distribution and differences in outcomes and clinical manifestations between time points and patient groups with and without CRPS 1 following an initiating event. Methods: Prospective cohort study with a consecutive registration of patients presenting with painful swelling of the affected extremity after an initiating event and follow-up visits after 3, 6 and 12 months. Results: Forty-two patients were enrolled (37 females, mean age 55.1 years). At baseline, 35 participants (83%, females n = 30) fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for CRPS 1. At 3 months, 19 out of the initial 35 CRPS 1 patients (54%) did not meet the diagnostic criteria anymore. Besides our inclusion criteria of a painful swelling, early manifestations indicating a CRPS 1 primarily include an impaired quality of life (SF-35, EQ5-D), more pain (NRS, MPQ) and restricted range of motion. Conclusions: CRPS 1 develops within 8 weeks following a noxious event. Although many CRPS 1 patients reach partial remission within the first 3 months, signs and symptoms do not improve significantly at 1 year. In order to identify prognostic risk factors large prospective cohort studies are needed. Significance: This prospective cohort study follows patients with complaints most suspected for complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) 1. CRPS 1 develops within 8 weeks following a noxious event. Although many CRPS 1 patients reach partial remission within the 3 months, symptoms do not improve significantly at 1 year.

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U2 - 10.1002/ejp.1064

DO - 10.1002/ejp.1064

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 1611

EP - 1617

JO - European Journal of Pain

JF - European Journal of Pain

SN - 1090-3801

IS - 9

ER -