Parental Diabetes Behaviors and Distress Are Related to Glycemic Control in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Longitudinal Data from the DINO Study

Minke M.A. Eilander, Frank J. Snoek, Joost Rotteveel, Henk Jan Aanstoot, Willie M. Bakker-Van Waarde, Euphemia C.A.M. Houdijk, Roos Nuboer, Per Winterdijk, Maartje De Wit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Objective . To evaluate (1) the longitudinal relationship between parental well-being and glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes and (2) if youth’s problem behavior, diabetes parenting behavior, and parental diabetes-distress influence this relationship. Research Design and Methods . Parents of youth 8–15 yrs (at baseline) ( N = 174 ) participating in the DINO study completed questionnaires at three time waves (1 yr interval). Using generalized estimating equations, the relationship between parental well-being (WHO-5) and youth’s HbA1c was examined. Second, relationships between WHO-5, Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), Diabetes Family Behavior Checklist (DFBC), Problem Areas In Diabetes-Parent Revised (PAID-Pr) scores, and HbA1c were analyzed. Results . Low well-being was reported by 32% of parents. No relationship was found between parents’ WHO-5 scores and youth’s HbA1c ( β = − 0.052 , p = 0.650 ). WHO-5 related to SDQ ( β = − 0.219 , p < 0.01 ), DFBC unsupportive scale ( β = − 0.174 , p < 0.01 ), and PAID-Pr ( β = − 0.666 , p < 0.01 ). Both DFBC scales (supportive β = − 0.259 , p = 0.01 ; unsupportive β = 0.383 , p = 0.017 ), PAID-Pr ( β = 0.276 , p < 0.01 ), and SDQ ( β = 0.424 , p < 0.01 ) related to HbA1c. Conclusions . Over time, reduced parental well-being relates to increased problem behavior in youth, unsupportive parenting, and parental distress, which negatively associate with HbA1c. More unsupportive diabetes parenting and distress relate to youth’s problem behavior.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Diabetes Research
Volume2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Cite this

Eilander, Minke M.A. ; Snoek, Frank J. ; Rotteveel, Joost ; Aanstoot, Henk Jan ; Bakker-Van Waarde, Willie M. ; Houdijk, Euphemia C.A.M. ; Nuboer, Roos ; Winterdijk, Per ; De Wit, Maartje. / Parental Diabetes Behaviors and Distress Are Related to Glycemic Control in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Longitudinal Data from the DINO Study. In: Journal of Diabetes Research. 2017 ; Vol. 2017.
@article{c3fc6438dbcc43b0b0e03a13377d6623,
title = "Parental Diabetes Behaviors and Distress Are Related to Glycemic Control in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Longitudinal Data from the DINO Study",
abstract = "Objective . To evaluate (1) the longitudinal relationship between parental well-being and glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes and (2) if youth’s problem behavior, diabetes parenting behavior, and parental diabetes-distress influence this relationship. Research Design and Methods . Parents of youth 8–15 yrs (at baseline) ( N = 174 ) participating in the DINO study completed questionnaires at three time waves (1 yr interval). Using generalized estimating equations, the relationship between parental well-being (WHO-5) and youth’s HbA1c was examined. Second, relationships between WHO-5, Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), Diabetes Family Behavior Checklist (DFBC), Problem Areas In Diabetes-Parent Revised (PAID-Pr) scores, and HbA1c were analyzed. Results . Low well-being was reported by 32{\%} of parents. No relationship was found between parents’ WHO-5 scores and youth’s HbA1c ( β = − 0.052 , p = 0.650 ). WHO-5 related to SDQ ( β = − 0.219 , p < 0.01 ), DFBC unsupportive scale ( β = − 0.174 , p < 0.01 ), and PAID-Pr ( β = − 0.666 , p < 0.01 ). Both DFBC scales (supportive β = − 0.259 , p = 0.01 ; unsupportive β = 0.383 , p = 0.017 ), PAID-Pr ( β = 0.276 , p < 0.01 ), and SDQ ( β = 0.424 , p < 0.01 ) related to HbA1c. Conclusions . Over time, reduced parental well-being relates to increased problem behavior in youth, unsupportive parenting, and parental distress, which negatively associate with HbA1c. More unsupportive diabetes parenting and distress relate to youth’s problem behavior.",
author = "Eilander, {Minke M.A.} and Snoek, {Frank J.} and Joost Rotteveel and Aanstoot, {Henk Jan} and {Bakker-Van Waarde}, {Willie M.} and Houdijk, {Euphemia C.A.M.} and Roos Nuboer and Per Winterdijk and {De Wit}, Maartje",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1155/2017/1462064",
language = "English",
volume = "2017",
journal = "Journal of Diabetes Research",
issn = "2314-6745",
publisher = "Hindawi Publishing Corporation",

}

Parental Diabetes Behaviors and Distress Are Related to Glycemic Control in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Longitudinal Data from the DINO Study. / Eilander, Minke M.A.; Snoek, Frank J.; Rotteveel, Joost; Aanstoot, Henk Jan; Bakker-Van Waarde, Willie M.; Houdijk, Euphemia C.A.M.; Nuboer, Roos; Winterdijk, Per; De Wit, Maartje.

In: Journal of Diabetes Research, Vol. 2017, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parental Diabetes Behaviors and Distress Are Related to Glycemic Control in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Longitudinal Data from the DINO Study

AU - Eilander, Minke M.A.

AU - Snoek, Frank J.

AU - Rotteveel, Joost

AU - Aanstoot, Henk Jan

AU - Bakker-Van Waarde, Willie M.

AU - Houdijk, Euphemia C.A.M.

AU - Nuboer, Roos

AU - Winterdijk, Per

AU - De Wit, Maartje

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Objective . To evaluate (1) the longitudinal relationship between parental well-being and glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes and (2) if youth’s problem behavior, diabetes parenting behavior, and parental diabetes-distress influence this relationship. Research Design and Methods . Parents of youth 8–15 yrs (at baseline) ( N = 174 ) participating in the DINO study completed questionnaires at three time waves (1 yr interval). Using generalized estimating equations, the relationship between parental well-being (WHO-5) and youth’s HbA1c was examined. Second, relationships between WHO-5, Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), Diabetes Family Behavior Checklist (DFBC), Problem Areas In Diabetes-Parent Revised (PAID-Pr) scores, and HbA1c were analyzed. Results . Low well-being was reported by 32% of parents. No relationship was found between parents’ WHO-5 scores and youth’s HbA1c ( β = − 0.052 , p = 0.650 ). WHO-5 related to SDQ ( β = − 0.219 , p < 0.01 ), DFBC unsupportive scale ( β = − 0.174 , p < 0.01 ), and PAID-Pr ( β = − 0.666 , p < 0.01 ). Both DFBC scales (supportive β = − 0.259 , p = 0.01 ; unsupportive β = 0.383 , p = 0.017 ), PAID-Pr ( β = 0.276 , p < 0.01 ), and SDQ ( β = 0.424 , p < 0.01 ) related to HbA1c. Conclusions . Over time, reduced parental well-being relates to increased problem behavior in youth, unsupportive parenting, and parental distress, which negatively associate with HbA1c. More unsupportive diabetes parenting and distress relate to youth’s problem behavior.

AB - Objective . To evaluate (1) the longitudinal relationship between parental well-being and glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes and (2) if youth’s problem behavior, diabetes parenting behavior, and parental diabetes-distress influence this relationship. Research Design and Methods . Parents of youth 8–15 yrs (at baseline) ( N = 174 ) participating in the DINO study completed questionnaires at three time waves (1 yr interval). Using generalized estimating equations, the relationship between parental well-being (WHO-5) and youth’s HbA1c was examined. Second, relationships between WHO-5, Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), Diabetes Family Behavior Checklist (DFBC), Problem Areas In Diabetes-Parent Revised (PAID-Pr) scores, and HbA1c were analyzed. Results . Low well-being was reported by 32% of parents. No relationship was found between parents’ WHO-5 scores and youth’s HbA1c ( β = − 0.052 , p = 0.650 ). WHO-5 related to SDQ ( β = − 0.219 , p < 0.01 ), DFBC unsupportive scale ( β = − 0.174 , p < 0.01 ), and PAID-Pr ( β = − 0.666 , p < 0.01 ). Both DFBC scales (supportive β = − 0.259 , p = 0.01 ; unsupportive β = 0.383 , p = 0.017 ), PAID-Pr ( β = 0.276 , p < 0.01 ), and SDQ ( β = 0.424 , p < 0.01 ) related to HbA1c. Conclusions . Over time, reduced parental well-being relates to increased problem behavior in youth, unsupportive parenting, and parental distress, which negatively associate with HbA1c. More unsupportive diabetes parenting and distress relate to youth’s problem behavior.

U2 - 10.1155/2017/1462064

DO - 10.1155/2017/1462064

M3 - Article

VL - 2017

JO - Journal of Diabetes Research

JF - Journal of Diabetes Research

SN - 2314-6745

ER -