Parental perceived travel time to and reported use of food retailers in association with school children’s dietary patterns

Mariane de Almeida Alves, Maria Gabriela M. Pinho*, Elizabeth Nappi Corrêa, Janaina Das Neves, Francisco de Assis Guedes de Vasconcelos

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Considering the association between the neighborhood food environment and individual eating behaviors, this study aimed to assess the association between parents’ reported use of food facilities by their children, and parental perceived travel time to food facilities, with their children’s dietary patterns. Parents reported the use of supermarkets, full-service and fast-food restaurants, and perceived travel time to these food retailers. To assess school children’s food consumption, a previous day dietary recall was applied. Factor analysis was conducted to identify dietary patterns. To test the association between reported use and perceived travel time to food retailers and school children’s dietary patterns, we performed multilevel linear regression analyses. Parents’ reported use of supermarkets was associated with children’s higher score in the “Morning/Evening Meal” pattern. The use of full-service and fast-food restaurants was associated with children’s higher score in the “Fast Food” pattern. Higher parental perceived travel time to full-service and fast-food restaurants was associated with children’s lower score in the “Fast Food” pattern. Although the use of full-service and fast-food restaurants was associated with a less healthy dietary pattern, the perception of living further away from these food retailers may pose a barrier for the use of these facilities. View Full-Text.

Original languageEnglish
Article number824
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019

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