Patient-Ventilator Interaction During Noninvasive Ventilation in Subjects With Exacerbation of COPD: Effect of Support Level and Ventilator Mode

Eline Oppersma, Jonne Doorduin, Lisanne H Roesthuis, Johannes G van der Hoeven, Peter H Veltink, Leo Ma Heunks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Patient-ventilator synchrony in patients with COPD is at risk during noninvasive ventilation (NIV). NIV in neurally-adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) mode improves synchrony compared to pressure support ventilation (PSV). The current study investigated patient-ventilator interaction at 2 levels of NAVA and PSV mode in subjects with COPD exacerbation.

METHODS: NIV was randomly applied at 2 levels (5 and 15 cm H2O) of PSV and NAVA. Patient-ventilator interaction was evaluated by comparing airway pressure and electrical activity of the diaphragm waveforms with automated computer algorithms.

RESULTS: 8 subjects were included. Trigger delay was longer in PSV high (268 ± 112 ms) than in PSV low (161 ± 118 ms, P = .043), and trigger delay during NAVA was shorter than PSV for both low support (49 ± 24 ms for NAVA, P = .035) and high support (79 ± 276 ms for NAVA, P = .003). No difference in cycling error for low and high levels of PSV (PSV low -100 ± 114 ms and PSV high 56 ± 315 ms) or NAVA (NAVA low -5 ± 18 ms, NAVA high 12 ± 36 ms) and no difference between PSV and NAVA was found.

CONCLUSIONS: Increasing PSV levels during NIV caused a progressive mismatch between neural effort and pneumatic timing. Patient-ventilator interaction during NAVA was more synchronous than during PSV, independent of inspiratory support level. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT01791335.).

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages8
JournalRespiratory care
Volume65
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 10 Mar 2020

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