Posterior, Anterior, and Periurethral Surgical Reconstruction of Urinary Continence Mechanisms in Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy: A Description and Video Compilation of Commonly Performed Surgical Techniques

André N. Vis, Henk G. van der Poel, Annebeth E. C. Ruiter, Jim C. Hu, Ashutosh K. Tewari, Bernardo Rocco, Vipul R. Patel, Sanjay Razdan, Jakko A. Nieuwenhuijzen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) is hampered by side effects that may have a serious impact on quality of life, particularly stress urinary incontinence. Continence rates may be improved by surgical reconstruction of the pelvic floor. Objective: Video illustrations of different surgical techniques may be particularly worthwhile for practicing urologists in understanding the pelvic-floor anatomy and in the training of residents and fellows in urology. Design, setting, and participants: We describe and video-illustrate commonly performed pelvic reconstructive techniques in RARP, as performed by experts in the field. Surgical procedure: Surgical techniques have been described, such as posterior musculofascial reconstruction, anterior reconstruction and periurethral suspension, preservation of membranous urethral lengthening, bladder-neck reconstruction, and combinations. Measurements: An overview of continence rates of the different techniques is given. Results and limitations: All reconstructive surgical techniques result in similar short-term continence rates and good-to-excellent outcomes 1 yr after surgery. There are only a few randomized clinical trials comparing a reconstructive technique with “no reconstruction” or a different reconstructive technique, and outcomes are conflicting. Conclusions: Although many of the procedures report a benefit with respect to early continence, benefits seem to diminish with longer follow-up. Whether any of the reconstructive techniques is superior to another is a matter of study. Patient summary: Early continence rates might be improved by surgical reconstruction of the pelvic floor. We describe and video-illustrate the most frequently performed pelvic reconstructive techniques in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy aimed at lowering stress urinary incontinence. Many of the procedures report a benefit with respect to early continence, which seems to diminish with longer follow-up.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)814-822
JournalEuropean Urology
Volume76
Issue number6
Early online date2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

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