Predictors for achieving adequate protein and energy intake in nursing home rehabilitation patients

J. I. van Zwienen-Pot*, M. Visser, H. M. Kruizenga

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Adequate energy and protein intake could be essential for contributing significantly to the rehabilitations process. Data on the actual nutritional intake of older nursing home rehabilitation patients have not yet been investigated. Aims: To investigate the nutritional intake and predictors for achieving protein and energy requirements on the 14th day of admission in nursing home rehabilitation patients. Methods: Fifty-nine patients aged 65+ years newly admitted to nursing home rehabilitation wards were included. Data on potential variables were collected on admission. On the fourteenth day nutritional intake was assessed. Intake was considered ‘adequate’ if patients had achieved ≥ 1.2 g of protein/kg bodyweight and ≥ 85% of their energy needs according to Harris and Benedict + 30%. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to select predictors for adequate intake. Results: Protein and energy intake was assessed in 79 patients [67% female, mean age 82 ± (SD) 8 years, BMI 25 ± 6 kg/m2]. Mean energy intake was 1677 kcal (± 433) and mean protein intake was 68 g (± 20). Fourteen patients (18%) achieved an adequate protein and energy intake. Predictors for adequate intake were use of sip/tube feeding (OR = 7.7; 95% CI = 1.35–44.21), BMI (0.68; 0.53–0.87) and nausea (8.59; 1.42–52.01). Conclusion: Only 18% of older nursing home rehabilitation patients had an adequate protein and energy intake at 14 days after admission. Patients with higher BMI were less likely, while those using sip/tube feeding or feeling nauseous were more likely to achieve an adequate protein and energy intake.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)799-809
Number of pages11
JournalAging - Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume30
Issue number7
Early online date17 Nov 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2018

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