Presence and Predictive Value of Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in Anxiety and Depressive Disorders

Mieke Klein Hofmeijer-Sevink, Neeltje M. Batelaan, Harold J.G.M. van Megen, Marcel A. van den Hout, Brenda W. Penninx, Anton J.L.M. van Balkom, Danielle C. Cath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) co-occur frequently with anxiety and depressive disorders, but the nature of their relationship and their impact on severity of anxiety and depressive disorders is poorly understood. In a large sample of patients with anxiety and depressive disorders, we assessed the frequency of OCS, defined as a Young Adult Self-Report Scale–obsessive-compulsive symptoms score >7. The associations between OCS and severity of anxiety and/or depressive disorders were examined, and it was investigated whether OCS predict onset, relapse, and persistence of anxiety and depressive disorders. Methods: Data were obtained from the third (at 2-year follow-up) and fourth wave (at 4-year follow-up) of data collection in the Netherlands Study of Anxiety and Depression cohort, including 469 healthy controls, 909 participants with a remitted disorder, and 747 participants with a current anxiety and/or depressive disorder. Results: OCS were present in 23.6% of the total sample, most notably in those with current combined anxiety and depressive disorders. In patients with a current disorder, OCS were associated with severity of this disorder. Moreover, OCS predicted (1) first onset of anxiety and/or depressive disorders in healthy controls (odds ratio [OR], 5.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15 to 29.14), (2) relapse in those with remitted anxiety and/or depressive disorders (OR, 2.31; 95% CI, 1.55 to 3.46), and (3) persistence in patients with the combination of current anxiety and depressive disorders (OR, 4.42; 95% CI, 2.54 to 7.70) within the 2-year follow-up period Conclusions: OCS are closely related to both the presence and severity of anxiety and depressive disorders and affect their course trajectories. Hence, OCS might be regarded as a course specifier signaling unfavorable outcomes. This specifier may be useful in clinical care to adapt and intensify treatment in individual patients.

Translated title of the contributionPresence and Predictive Value of Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in Anxiety and Depressive Disorders
Original languageFrench
Pages (from-to)85-93
Number of pages9
JournalCanadian Journal of Psychiatry
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

Cite this

Hofmeijer-Sevink, Mieke Klein ; Batelaan, Neeltje M. ; van Megen, Harold J.G.M. ; van den Hout, Marcel A. ; Penninx, Brenda W. ; van Balkom, Anton J.L.M. ; Cath, Danielle C. / Présence et valeur prédictive de symptômes obsessionnels-compulsifs dans les troubles anxieux et dépressifs. In: Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. 2018 ; Vol. 63, No. 2. pp. 85-93.
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title = "Pr{\'e}sence et valeur pr{\'e}dictive de sympt{\^o}mes obsessionnels-compulsifs dans les troubles anxieux et d{\'e}pressifs",
abstract = "Objective: Obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) co-occur frequently with anxiety and depressive disorders, but the nature of their relationship and their impact on severity of anxiety and depressive disorders is poorly understood. In a large sample of patients with anxiety and depressive disorders, we assessed the frequency of OCS, defined as a Young Adult Self-Report Scale–obsessive-compulsive symptoms score >7. The associations between OCS and severity of anxiety and/or depressive disorders were examined, and it was investigated whether OCS predict onset, relapse, and persistence of anxiety and depressive disorders. Methods: Data were obtained from the third (at 2-year follow-up) and fourth wave (at 4-year follow-up) of data collection in the Netherlands Study of Anxiety and Depression cohort, including 469 healthy controls, 909 participants with a remitted disorder, and 747 participants with a current anxiety and/or depressive disorder. Results: OCS were present in 23.6{\%} of the total sample, most notably in those with current combined anxiety and depressive disorders. In patients with a current disorder, OCS were associated with severity of this disorder. Moreover, OCS predicted (1) first onset of anxiety and/or depressive disorders in healthy controls (odds ratio [OR], 5.79; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.15 to 29.14), (2) relapse in those with remitted anxiety and/or depressive disorders (OR, 2.31; 95{\%} CI, 1.55 to 3.46), and (3) persistence in patients with the combination of current anxiety and depressive disorders (OR, 4.42; 95{\%} CI, 2.54 to 7.70) within the 2-year follow-up period Conclusions: OCS are closely related to both the presence and severity of anxiety and depressive disorders and affect their course trajectories. Hence, OCS might be regarded as a course specifier signaling unfavorable outcomes. This specifier may be useful in clinical care to adapt and intensify treatment in individual patients.",
keywords = "anxiety disorders, comorbidity, course, depressive disorders, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, prevalence, prognosis, severity",
author = "Hofmeijer-Sevink, {Mieke Klein} and Batelaan, {Neeltje M.} and {van Megen}, {Harold J.G.M.} and {van den Hout}, {Marcel A.} and Penninx, {Brenda W.} and {van Balkom}, {Anton J.L.M.} and Cath, {Danielle C.}",
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Présence et valeur prédictive de symptômes obsessionnels-compulsifs dans les troubles anxieux et dépressifs. / Hofmeijer-Sevink, Mieke Klein; Batelaan, Neeltje M.; van Megen, Harold J.G.M.; van den Hout, Marcel A.; Penninx, Brenda W.; van Balkom, Anton J.L.M.; Cath, Danielle C.

In: Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 63, No. 2, 01.02.2018, p. 85-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Présence et valeur prédictive de symptômes obsessionnels-compulsifs dans les troubles anxieux et dépressifs

AU - Hofmeijer-Sevink, Mieke Klein

AU - Batelaan, Neeltje M.

AU - van Megen, Harold J.G.M.

AU - van den Hout, Marcel A.

AU - Penninx, Brenda W.

AU - van Balkom, Anton J.L.M.

AU - Cath, Danielle C.

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - Objective: Obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) co-occur frequently with anxiety and depressive disorders, but the nature of their relationship and their impact on severity of anxiety and depressive disorders is poorly understood. In a large sample of patients with anxiety and depressive disorders, we assessed the frequency of OCS, defined as a Young Adult Self-Report Scale–obsessive-compulsive symptoms score >7. The associations between OCS and severity of anxiety and/or depressive disorders were examined, and it was investigated whether OCS predict onset, relapse, and persistence of anxiety and depressive disorders. Methods: Data were obtained from the third (at 2-year follow-up) and fourth wave (at 4-year follow-up) of data collection in the Netherlands Study of Anxiety and Depression cohort, including 469 healthy controls, 909 participants with a remitted disorder, and 747 participants with a current anxiety and/or depressive disorder. Results: OCS were present in 23.6% of the total sample, most notably in those with current combined anxiety and depressive disorders. In patients with a current disorder, OCS were associated with severity of this disorder. Moreover, OCS predicted (1) first onset of anxiety and/or depressive disorders in healthy controls (odds ratio [OR], 5.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15 to 29.14), (2) relapse in those with remitted anxiety and/or depressive disorders (OR, 2.31; 95% CI, 1.55 to 3.46), and (3) persistence in patients with the combination of current anxiety and depressive disorders (OR, 4.42; 95% CI, 2.54 to 7.70) within the 2-year follow-up period Conclusions: OCS are closely related to both the presence and severity of anxiety and depressive disorders and affect their course trajectories. Hence, OCS might be regarded as a course specifier signaling unfavorable outcomes. This specifier may be useful in clinical care to adapt and intensify treatment in individual patients.

AB - Objective: Obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) co-occur frequently with anxiety and depressive disorders, but the nature of their relationship and their impact on severity of anxiety and depressive disorders is poorly understood. In a large sample of patients with anxiety and depressive disorders, we assessed the frequency of OCS, defined as a Young Adult Self-Report Scale–obsessive-compulsive symptoms score >7. The associations between OCS and severity of anxiety and/or depressive disorders were examined, and it was investigated whether OCS predict onset, relapse, and persistence of anxiety and depressive disorders. Methods: Data were obtained from the third (at 2-year follow-up) and fourth wave (at 4-year follow-up) of data collection in the Netherlands Study of Anxiety and Depression cohort, including 469 healthy controls, 909 participants with a remitted disorder, and 747 participants with a current anxiety and/or depressive disorder. Results: OCS were present in 23.6% of the total sample, most notably in those with current combined anxiety and depressive disorders. In patients with a current disorder, OCS were associated with severity of this disorder. Moreover, OCS predicted (1) first onset of anxiety and/or depressive disorders in healthy controls (odds ratio [OR], 5.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15 to 29.14), (2) relapse in those with remitted anxiety and/or depressive disorders (OR, 2.31; 95% CI, 1.55 to 3.46), and (3) persistence in patients with the combination of current anxiety and depressive disorders (OR, 4.42; 95% CI, 2.54 to 7.70) within the 2-year follow-up period Conclusions: OCS are closely related to both the presence and severity of anxiety and depressive disorders and affect their course trajectories. Hence, OCS might be regarded as a course specifier signaling unfavorable outcomes. This specifier may be useful in clinical care to adapt and intensify treatment in individual patients.

KW - anxiety disorders

KW - comorbidity

KW - course

KW - depressive disorders

KW - obsessive-compulsive symptoms

KW - prevalence

KW - prognosis

KW - severity

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U2 - 10.1177/0706743717711170

DO - 10.1177/0706743717711170

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JO - Canadian Journal of Psychiatry

JF - Canadian Journal of Psychiatry

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