Quantifying muscle fatigue during walking in people with multiple sclerosis

Maaike M. Eken, Rosie Richards, Heleen Beckerman, Marjolein van der Krogt, Karin Gerrits, Marc Rietberg, Vincent de Groot, Martin Heine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to examine muscle fatigue in lower leg muscles in of people with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls, and whether muscle fatigue coincided with potential changes in gait. Methods: In this case-control study, people with multiple sclerosis (n = 8; 3male; mean age (SD) = 49.7 (9.6) yr) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 10; 4male; mean age (SD) = 47.4 (8.7) yr) walked on a treadmill for 12-min at self-paced speed. Muscle fatigue was indirectly quantified by a decrease in median frequency and increase in root mean square of surface electromyographic recordings of lower leg muscles. Walking speed, ankle push-off power and net ankle work were calculated from marker positions and force plate data using inverse dynamic calculations. Results: People with multiple sclerosis showed larger decreases in median frequency of soleus (most affected leg: p = 0.003; least affected leg: p = 0.009) and larger increases in root mean square of soleus (most and least affected leg: p = 0.037), gastrocnemius medialis (most affected leg: p = 0.003; least affected leg: p = 0.005) and lateralis (most and least affected leg: p < 0.001) compared to controls. Walking speed (p = 0.001), ankle push-off power (most affected leg: p = 0.018; least affected leg: p = 0.001) and net work around the ankle (most affected leg: p = 0.046; least affected leg: p = 0.001) were lower in people with multiple sclerosis compared to controls, but increased in both groups. Interpretation: The results yield preliminary evidence that soleus muscles of people with multiple sclerosis fatigue during prolonged walking. Changes in electromyography of gastrocnemius muscles could however be related to muscle fatigue, changes in gait or a combination.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)94-101
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Biomechanics
Volume72
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2020

Cite this

@article{21435e6f0c004d8c8e31875de9caa4d0,
title = "Quantifying muscle fatigue during walking in people with multiple sclerosis",
abstract = "Background: This study aimed to examine muscle fatigue in lower leg muscles in of people with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls, and whether muscle fatigue coincided with potential changes in gait. Methods: In this case-control study, people with multiple sclerosis (n = 8; 3male; mean age (SD) = 49.7 (9.6) yr) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 10; 4male; mean age (SD) = 47.4 (8.7) yr) walked on a treadmill for 12-min at self-paced speed. Muscle fatigue was indirectly quantified by a decrease in median frequency and increase in root mean square of surface electromyographic recordings of lower leg muscles. Walking speed, ankle push-off power and net ankle work were calculated from marker positions and force plate data using inverse dynamic calculations. Results: People with multiple sclerosis showed larger decreases in median frequency of soleus (most affected leg: p = 0.003; least affected leg: p = 0.009) and larger increases in root mean square of soleus (most and least affected leg: p = 0.037), gastrocnemius medialis (most affected leg: p = 0.003; least affected leg: p = 0.005) and lateralis (most and least affected leg: p < 0.001) compared to controls. Walking speed (p = 0.001), ankle push-off power (most affected leg: p = 0.018; least affected leg: p = 0.001) and net work around the ankle (most affected leg: p = 0.046; least affected leg: p = 0.001) were lower in people with multiple sclerosis compared to controls, but increased in both groups. Interpretation: The results yield preliminary evidence that soleus muscles of people with multiple sclerosis fatigue during prolonged walking. Changes in electromyography of gastrocnemius muscles could however be related to muscle fatigue, changes in gait or a combination.",
keywords = "Electromyography, Multiple sclerosis, Muscle fatigue, Power, Walking",
author = "Eken, {Maaike M.} and Rosie Richards and Heleen Beckerman and {van der Krogt}, Marjolein and Karin Gerrits and Marc Rietberg and {de Groot}, Vincent and Martin Heine",
year = "2020",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2019.11.020",
language = "English",
volume = "72",
pages = "94--101",
journal = "Clinical Biomechanics",
issn = "0268-0033",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

Quantifying muscle fatigue during walking in people with multiple sclerosis. / Eken, Maaike M.; Richards, Rosie; Beckerman, Heleen; van der Krogt, Marjolein; Gerrits, Karin; Rietberg, Marc; de Groot, Vincent; Heine, Martin.

In: Clinical Biomechanics, Vol. 72, 01.02.2020, p. 94-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quantifying muscle fatigue during walking in people with multiple sclerosis

AU - Eken, Maaike M.

AU - Richards, Rosie

AU - Beckerman, Heleen

AU - van der Krogt, Marjolein

AU - Gerrits, Karin

AU - Rietberg, Marc

AU - de Groot, Vincent

AU - Heine, Martin

PY - 2020/2/1

Y1 - 2020/2/1

N2 - Background: This study aimed to examine muscle fatigue in lower leg muscles in of people with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls, and whether muscle fatigue coincided with potential changes in gait. Methods: In this case-control study, people with multiple sclerosis (n = 8; 3male; mean age (SD) = 49.7 (9.6) yr) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 10; 4male; mean age (SD) = 47.4 (8.7) yr) walked on a treadmill for 12-min at self-paced speed. Muscle fatigue was indirectly quantified by a decrease in median frequency and increase in root mean square of surface electromyographic recordings of lower leg muscles. Walking speed, ankle push-off power and net ankle work were calculated from marker positions and force plate data using inverse dynamic calculations. Results: People with multiple sclerosis showed larger decreases in median frequency of soleus (most affected leg: p = 0.003; least affected leg: p = 0.009) and larger increases in root mean square of soleus (most and least affected leg: p = 0.037), gastrocnemius medialis (most affected leg: p = 0.003; least affected leg: p = 0.005) and lateralis (most and least affected leg: p < 0.001) compared to controls. Walking speed (p = 0.001), ankle push-off power (most affected leg: p = 0.018; least affected leg: p = 0.001) and net work around the ankle (most affected leg: p = 0.046; least affected leg: p = 0.001) were lower in people with multiple sclerosis compared to controls, but increased in both groups. Interpretation: The results yield preliminary evidence that soleus muscles of people with multiple sclerosis fatigue during prolonged walking. Changes in electromyography of gastrocnemius muscles could however be related to muscle fatigue, changes in gait or a combination.

AB - Background: This study aimed to examine muscle fatigue in lower leg muscles in of people with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls, and whether muscle fatigue coincided with potential changes in gait. Methods: In this case-control study, people with multiple sclerosis (n = 8; 3male; mean age (SD) = 49.7 (9.6) yr) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 10; 4male; mean age (SD) = 47.4 (8.7) yr) walked on a treadmill for 12-min at self-paced speed. Muscle fatigue was indirectly quantified by a decrease in median frequency and increase in root mean square of surface electromyographic recordings of lower leg muscles. Walking speed, ankle push-off power and net ankle work were calculated from marker positions and force plate data using inverse dynamic calculations. Results: People with multiple sclerosis showed larger decreases in median frequency of soleus (most affected leg: p = 0.003; least affected leg: p = 0.009) and larger increases in root mean square of soleus (most and least affected leg: p = 0.037), gastrocnemius medialis (most affected leg: p = 0.003; least affected leg: p = 0.005) and lateralis (most and least affected leg: p < 0.001) compared to controls. Walking speed (p = 0.001), ankle push-off power (most affected leg: p = 0.018; least affected leg: p = 0.001) and net work around the ankle (most affected leg: p = 0.046; least affected leg: p = 0.001) were lower in people with multiple sclerosis compared to controls, but increased in both groups. Interpretation: The results yield preliminary evidence that soleus muscles of people with multiple sclerosis fatigue during prolonged walking. Changes in electromyography of gastrocnemius muscles could however be related to muscle fatigue, changes in gait or a combination.

KW - Electromyography

KW - Multiple sclerosis

KW - Muscle fatigue

KW - Power

KW - Walking

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85076343052&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2019.11.020

DO - 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2019.11.020

M3 - Article

VL - 72

SP - 94

EP - 101

JO - Clinical Biomechanics

JF - Clinical Biomechanics

SN - 0268-0033

ER -